Thursday October 19, 2017
Home Uncategorized Dadri is not ...

Dadri is not first incident of its kind: Adman Piyush Pandey

0
52

New Delhi: Ad guru Piyush Pandey, the brain behind the famed ‘Ab Ki Baar Modi Sarkar’ campaign, says the Dadri lynching is not the first of its kind and such incidents happen every year.

“If you say that Dadri is the first such incident in the history of India, you are living in a utopian land. Dadri-like incidents happen every year. It could be rape; it could be about eating beef,” Pandey, executive chairman and creative director at Ogilvy & Mather, told IANS after the launch of his new book ‘Pandeymonium’.

The adman said he was not condoning any of the incidents, but “I can talk about Sikh riots in 1984 or Bhagalpur violence or the Bhopal gas tragedy. It happens irrespective of the government in power.”

The book gives a peek into the mind and creative genius behind the many legendary ads like Fevicol, Cadbury, Asian Paints, ‘Chal Meri Luna’, to name a few of the well-known ones.

Pandey, who spearheaded the ad campaign for Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) with the tagline ‘Achhe Din aane waale hain’ in the general elections of 2014, said that the BJP was his preferred political party at the moment for its agenda on development.

He said he was not dissuaded by incidents like lynching of a Muslim man in Dadri since he believes these kinds of incidents occur irrespective of governments in power.

He said he doesn’t want to take the credit for the BJP’s success in the elections.

“You can only sell a good product, not a bad one. Everything was a team effort. The tagline ‘Acche Din’, ‘Janata maaf nahi karegi’, came from little things from life. That’s why it resonated with people. ‘Ab Ki Baar Modi Sarkar’, is not any rocket science. It was BJP’s decision to lead with Modi, so it happened,” said the maverick.

Asked if the government could do justice to the ‘Acche Din’ campaign, he replied: “When you sow a seed, you won’t get results overnight. It takes time to turn a big ship. It’s not a small boat. People are impatient.”

The most sought-after man in the industry is all praise for Prime Minister Narendra Modi.

“I share a personal rapport with Modi. I have worked with him when he was leading the tourism campaign for Gujarat as the chief minister. He was involved thoroughly in the campaign. He had an eye for detail and he is extremely professional,” Pandey said.

The book talks of the story behind many of the ads which had won wide appreciation and the maverick says that it’s all about people, life, family and friends who inspired them.

“I chat up with people and try to know more about them. They might appear as stories later, not always. Even now I find moments to talk to people,” he laughs. Whenever there is dearth of ideas, the critically acclaimed adman goes back to Jaipur, where he grew up, he writes in his book.

The adman also says had it not been for the carpenters and cobblers, the legendary Fevicol ad wouldn’t have seen the light of the day. He writes in his book about how his father brought carpenters home to make a dining table and how he discovered that carpenters had ancestors who carved wood for the maharajahs of Rajasthan.

“Thank god, my father didn’t have the money to buy ready-made furniture. I would never have been fascinated by these artists – and Ogilvy wouldn’t have done great work on the Fevicol brand,” he said.

Pandey fondly remembers the polio eradication drive in association with actor Amitabh Bachchan. “It was a great moment when India was declared 100 percent polio free,” reminisces Pandey, who has won 800 advertising awards in his 33 years in the field.

He also dismisses the concept of research in advertising, saying that it’s stupid.

“The Cadbury Dairy Milk girl dancing on the cricket field would have become a saint if she had been pre-tested. Most of the Fevicol work would not have happened because we did not show furniture. The Zoozoos of Vodafone would be aliens on earth. And Piyush Pandey would be a failed cricketer selling potatoes because he couldn’t pass the ‘link’ test of advertising,” he writes.

Pandey says that he has made a conscious effort to promote socially responsible ads whether on gender equality, social harmony or other changing social realities.

“We have done campaigns on banning acids and ads against domestic violence with NGO Breakthrough. The Red Label tea ad is about Hindu family and Muslim family, and there are ads on single mothers, queer community and more,” he said.

(Preetha Nair, IANS)

Next Story

Government drops ‘Aam Aadmi’ tagline from Aadhaar Card, makes it ‘Mera Aadhaar, Meri Pehchan’

Even though the tagline was changed six months before, the Ministry of Communications and IT confirmed it on Tuesday, June 28

1
3334
Aadhaar Card. Image source:www.youthkiawaaz.com
  • Aadhar Card has been a continuous acrimonious debate since it was issued two years ago
  • Earlier its tagline was “Aam Aadmi ka Adhikar” but now it has been changed to “Mera Aadhaar, Meri Pehchan”
  • Delhi Spokesperson of BJP Ashwini Upadhyay filed a petition in front of Prime Minister to change the tagline

Aadhar Card has been a continuous acrimonious debate since it was issued two years ago. To spread the message that it is for all, Government of India has dropped ‘Aam Aadmi’ from its tagline and changed it to ‘Mera Aadhaar, Meri Pehchan’.

The change in tagline was successful due to the efforts of Bharatiya Janata Party’s Delhi unit spokesperson Ashwini Upadhyay and several others, who requested the government to drop the words. Even though the tagline was changed six months before, the Ministry of Communications and IT confirmed it on Tuesday, June 28.

Biometric identification. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

Biometric identification. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

Aadhaar was created before AAP (Aam Aadmi Party) came into being.  But, there was a debate to change the tagline since AAP was formed, which started when the previous government was in power.

Follow NewsGram on Twitter: @newsgram1

Delhi Spokesperson of BJP Ashwini Upadhyay. Image Source: ANI

Delhi Spokesperson of BJP Ashwini Upadhyay filed a petition in front of Prime Minister to change the tagline last year, on 19th September 2015. Earlier tagline means Aadhaar is a right of common man to which Upadhyay counteracted and said that Aadhaar is issued to everybody, whether he/she is a common man or not. Therefore, its tagline must be changed.

Follow NewsGram on Facebook: NewsGram.com

In his petition, he mentioned, “AADHAR Card is right of every Indian whether he/she belongs to BPL, EWS, LIG, MIG, HIG category or elite class but contrary to it, it’s written on the AADHAAR card that – “AADHAAR is right of common man”, reported the Economic Times.

Although an internal source from UIDAI said that the discussion to change the tagline was started when Aam Aadmi Party was formed. The Aadhar Card was made before the AAP was formed.

-This report is compiled by a staff-writer at NewsGram.

ALSO READ:

Next Story

Chinese Company Ad unintentionally sets off Talk on Racism

0
86
  • A detergent advertisement by a Chinese company Qiaobi, invites criticism on the grounds of racism
  • A black man is ‘washed’ with the help of the advertised product to change into a fair, chinese man
  • Qiaobi formally writes an apoplgy statement, stating it expresses deep regret for hurting sentiments of the Black people

A seemingly simple advertisement by a Chinese company, Qiaobi, which was first released on Chinese social media in March, came under widespread scrutiny last week as foreign media fueled allegations of propagating racism against the company.

The advertisement shows a black man trying to flirt with an Asian woman, who, unimpressed by his efforts, tosses him into the washing machine to wash him with the company’s advertised product. In a short while, a fair Chinese man appears from the machine, who highly appeals to the woman, as is evident by her smile.

After the sudden attention that the ad received, many online comments surfaced, like, “It should be taken down. All in all, not only is it offensive, but the rest is a complete copy. It has really caused us Chinese to lose face’, referring to the allegation that it was copied from a similar racist Italian advertisement. A few comments, however, spoke in favor of the Chinese company, saying, “There’s no reason to apologize. Blacks aren’t part of the 56 minority groups in China, so how could it be considered offensive?”.

After careful assessment and to avoid further negative press to the advertisement, Qiaobi issued an apology statement, which reads:

On 27 May 2016 on Sina Weibo, media outlets and internet users shared American media reports with the following information: “China’s Qiaobi advertisement is accused of ethnic discrimination, incites controversy on YouTube.” Later, we verified that the ad has been reported on or circulated by American media outlets including the Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times, and CNN; the UK’s BBC; France’s AFP, and other media outlets. It has attracted public attention in the US, the UK, and elsewhere. We’d like to express that we have properly managed this situation and would like to add the following:

  1. We have no intentions to discriminate against people of color… Ethnic discrimination is something we strongly reject and condemn.
  2. We express regret over the controversy the ad has created and do not intend to shirk responsibility. We have already stopped the ad’s circulation and have canceled several online streaming links. We hope that internet users and the media will cease sharing the video.
  3. The advertisement and the surrounding controversy have hurt people of African descent. We express our apologies, and also sincerely hope internet users and media won’t overanalyze the situation.
  4. Qiaobi is a domestic Chinese brand of cleaning products. We hope that domestic brands can continue to thrive and go global.

Written by Saurabh Bodas. Saurabh studies Mechatronics Engineering at Manipal Institute of Technology.

Also Read:

Next Story

Indian-origin researchers propose new method for preventing pay-per-click fraud

0
57

New York: Indian-origin researchers have proposed a new method for detecting fraud from the pay-per-click model – a pricing model used for online advertising.

“If somebody likes something, they can click on the ad and go directly to the site. Hopefully, that translates to a sale. No matter whether it does or not, the advertiser pays for these clicks. In the pay-per-click model, if people or bots are clicking fraudulently, then the advertiser is losing money,” said Suresh Radhakrishnan, professor at the University of Texas in the US.

The researchers have proposed a way to support technological improvements to check fraud which, they said, is affecting the advertising industry as a whole.

The study considers identifying click fraud as a three-stage process: the service provider — for example, Google or Yahoo — classifies clicks as fraudulent or not.

Then, the advertiser does the same, using his technology. If there is a disagreement, the service provider examines further and its conclusion is considered binding.

The problem with the new approach is intuitive. For a service provider, if he gets paid, it doesn’t matter whether it’s a valid click or a fraudulent.

But the advertiser would want to verify whether the click is fraudulent or not. Even if the click is valid, the advertiser may say that it’s fraudulent because of the pay-per-click cost, the researchers explained.

To solve the problem, the researchers suggested that an independent third party investigate and flag fraudulent clicks when a conflict arises between the advertiser and the service provider.

“In the long term, for the pay-per-click model to survive, you will need to make sure both parties are happy, so technologies will have to get to a point where click fraud is minimized,” Varghese Jacob, vice dean of the Naveen Jindal School of Management.

“People will have to invest in such improvements. Otherwise the pay-per-click model may not be sustainable,” Jacob noted.

The findings appeared in the journal Information Systems Research. (IANS) (Photo: http://www.lifehack.org)