Wednesday September 19, 2018
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Death of Zimbabwean dollar: 175 quadrillion Zimbabwean dollars will be exchanged for $5

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zimbabwe-162465_640By NewGram Staff Writer: Reserve Bank of Zimbabwe Governor, John Mangudya announced that customers having Zimbabwean dollar accounts prior to March 2009 can approach the banks to convert their Zimbabwean dollar balance into dollars.

This statement came after President Robert Mugabe’s government discarded the virtually worthless national currency. Zimbabwe started using foreign currencies like the US dollar and South African rand after the Zimbabwean dollar was ruined by hyper-inflation in 2009.

As reported by media outlets bank accounts with balances of up to 175 quadrillion Zimbabwean dollars will be paid $5. The bank accounts with balances above 175 quadrillion dollars will be paid at an exchange rate of $1 to 35 quadrillion Zimbabwean dollars. Customers in possession of stashes of old Zimbabwean dollar notes can walk into any bank and get $1 for every 250 trillion they hold.

Reportedly the highest and last bank note to be printed by the RBZ in 2008 was 100 trillion Zimbabwean dollars. This process will legally end the local currency.

 

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Zimbabwe Officials Trying to Fight Cholera Clash With Street Vendors

A cholera outbreak is the second since a 2008-09 epidemic claimed almost 5,000 lives.

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Zimbabwe, Cholera
Zimbabwe police was in streets of Harare on Sept. 16, 2018 removing vendors as part of efforts to fight cholera outbreak which has killed more than two dozen people over the past two weeks. VOA

Zimbabwe police Sunday clashed with vendors who were resisting being removed from streets as part of the country’s efforts to fight the cholera outbreak, which has claimed more than two dozen lives in the past two weeks.

Vendors were alerting each other of armed riot police and municipality officials coming to confiscate their wares Sunday in Harare. As soon as police officials left, the vendors would resume their business.

One of them is 34-year-old Maria Mange, a mother who three children who says unless she gets employed, she will remain selling vegetables and fruits in Harare’s CBD.

Zimbabwe, Cholera
Vendors in Harare say they not leave their business as they have no other sources of income with Zimbabwe’s unemployment rate said to be around 85 percent. VOA

“I am refusing to leave the streets on the basis that we cause the spread of cholera,” she said. “Our wares are cleaned or boiled before being consumed. It is dirty water which causes cholera, their failure to collect refuse, plus flowing sewage in the streets and blocked sewer pipes. Why concentrate on vendors and not criminals?”

Another vendor is Ronald Takura who says he has to find a way to make a livliehood.

“No, vendors are not causing the cholera. You are disturbing [our] search for money in our country,” he said. “I do not have a job and I do not have work to do. So do not send us out. I do not understand what is happening in this city. E.D. Mnangagwa, we supported, we do not see what he is doing for us.”

Zimbabwe, Cholera
Obediah Moyo Zimbabwe’s minister of health says there is no going back on vendors in streets, in Harare. VOA

He adds in Shona language, Zimbabweans voted for President Emmerson Mnangagwa in the July 30th elections, but he is not supporting the vendors.

But Zimbabwe’s minister of health, Obediah Moyo, says there is no going back.

“The issue of food vending is another issue, we all agreed that has to stop, especially in the area of epicenter [of the epidemic], that the police are helping us to stop the vending of food,” he said.

Zimbabwe, Cholera
In Zimbabwe trash can go for days or weeks without being collected which experts is one of the factors for spreading cholera outbreak in Harare. VOA

Zimbabwe’s cholera outbreak has since spread to several parts of the country from its epicenter in Harare’s densely populated suburbs.

Also Read: Video- Zimbabwe’s Newly Appointed President Calls For Unity

International organizations such as UNICEF, WHO, and MSF have since moved in with assistance. But critics say the long-term solution is improving water supply, sanitation and regular waste collection by Zimbabwean authorities.

A cholera outbreak is the second since a 2008-09 epidemic claimed almost 5,000 lives. (VOA)