Wednesday June 20, 2018

Delhi Air pollution: Lessons India can learn from China

Since China had to deal with a similar situation and they managed to deal with it efficiently, India can follow China’s war against pollution policies

2
//
386
Polluted Delhi Air. VOA
Republish
Reprint

November 6, 2016: The Capital city of India faces the worst smog in 17 years, and it is worsening day by day but the authorities are yet to devise a proper action plan in order to tackle such a serious problem.

Since China had to deal with a similar situation and they managed to deal with it efficiently, India can follow China’s war against pollution policies.
Here are the few measures China took:

NewsGram brings to you latest new stories in India

Here are the few measures China took to counter Pollution in their country:

Red alert

In 2015, in the month of December Beijing issued its first ‘red alert’ for high pollution and shut down schools, construction sites, factories and an odd-even rule were applied to private cars until the quality of air dropped below the hazardous levels. People were also urged to wear masks and take all kinds of protective measures.

Imposing Laws

On January 1, 2015, China’s Environmental Protection Law came into force. Before the amendment took place, the cost of compliance was much higher than the cost of noncompliance.

According to Jonesday.com report, “The average cost of noncompliance under the ECL was less than 10 percent of the cost of environment rectification. Thus, polluters strategically chose payment of penalties over compliance for the obvious economic benefits.” In order to address the problem, EPL established a new penalty process, according to which the penalties are to be calculated on a daily basis until the rectification is completed.

In 2015, the country also appointed an environmental scientist as its Environment Minister.

Go to NewsGram and check out news related to political current issues

Online air reporting system

After China came to know about their hazardous quality of air, China created an online air reporting system to monitor the hourly air pollution data from over 1,500 sites which included the details of airborne particulate matter (PM), nitrogen dioxide, sulphur dioxide, ozone and carbon monoxide.

Currently, the government regularly also releases air quality rankings for the cities.

Off the road

By 2017, high-polluting vehicles will be taken off the roads. Beijing, Guangzhou, Shanghai, and other large Chinese cities are slowly restricting the number of vehicles in order to curb air pollution.

[bctt tweet=”India can adopt some of the China’s pollution control measures” username=””]

Look for latest news from India in NewsGram

By 2017, Beijing region is also aiming to reduce the use of coal by replacing it with electricity from non-fossil fuels and natural gas. It also aims to close all excess iron, cement, steel, and all heavy industries that burn coal. By 2020 the city aims to be completely coal-free.

– by Pinaz Kazi of NewsGram. Twitter: @PinazKazi

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2016 NewsGram

  • Saurabh Vashist

    illegal factories that are working in residential areas are polluting Delhi Air and are becoming main cause of making it unfavourable for human being to live in Delhi. What these factories are doing here in residential areas while according to the laws no body has the right to violet the lawas by opening illegal factories in the residential areas and why no action is being taken on them by Delhi Gov and Center Gov.

  • Ruchika Kumari

    Delhi should follow all these measures as soon as possible

Next Story

Air Pollution: WHO Releases List of The Best And Worst Cities

90% of world's population breathes badly polluted air: WHO

0
Air Pollution
WHO releases a list of most and least polluted cities. Pixabay

Nine out of every 10 people on the planet breathe air that contains high levels of pollutants and kills seven million people each year, according to a new World Health Organization (WHO) study released on Wednesday.

The study is an analysis of what the WHO says is the world’s most comprehensive database on ambient air pollution. The organisation collected the data from more than 4,300 cities and 108 countries, reports CNN.

People in Asia and Africa face the biggest problems, according to the study.

More than 90 per cent of air pollution-related deaths happen there, but cities in the Americas, Europe and the Eastern Mediterranean also have air pollution levels that are beyond what the WHO considers healthy.

The new WHO data show that US cities on the more polluted side of the list include Los Angeles, Bakersfield and Fresno, California; Indianapolis; and the Elkhart-Goshen area of Indiana.

Air Pollution.
Air Pollution. Pixabay

Peshawar and Rawalpindi in Pakistan, have some of the highest particulate air pollution levels in the database. Varanasi and Kanpur in India; Cairo; and Al Jubail, Saudi Arabia, also show higher levels.

“I’m afraid what is dramatic is that air pollution levels still remain at dangerously high levels in many parts of the world,” CNN quoted Maria Neira, director of the WHO’s Department of Public Health, Environmental and Social Determinants of Health, as saying.

“No doubt that air pollution represents today not only the biggest environmental risk for health, but I will clearly say that this is a major, major challenge for public health at the moment and probably one of the biggest ones we are contemplating.”

Particle pollution, a mix of solid and liquid droplets in the air, can get sucked into and embedded deep in your lungs when you breathe. That can lead to health conditions including asthma, lung cancer, heart disease, stroke and chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD), according to the study.

Also Read: Air Pollution And Its Effects On Our Health

These outdoor particulates — including sulphate, nitrates and black carbon — are largely created by car and truck traffic, manufacturing, power plants and farming. In total, air pollution caused about 4.2 million deaths in 2016, it added.

“Many of the world’s megacities exceed WHO’s guideline levels for air quality by more than five times, representing a major risk to people’s health,” Neira said. This is “a very dramatic problem that we are facing now”.

Cleaner air accounts for in cities like like Wenden, Arizona (population 2,882), or Cheyenne, Wyoming (population 64,019).

The Eureka-Arcata-Fortuna area of California; Battlement Mesa, Colorado; Wasilla, Alaska; Gillette, Wyoming; and Kapaa, Hawaii, are all on the cleaner-air list.

One of the bigger US cities with cleaner air is Honolulu, according to the WHO data.  (IANS)