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Delhi-based Parikrama mesmerizes audience in Assam with its music

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Guwahati: Delhi-based rock band Parikrama gave a high-octane performance at the ongoing Rongali — Destination, Culture, Harmony — a festival of Assam, for their loyal fans of the northeastern state.

The performance by the band, consisting of members like Saurabh Choudhary, Srijan Mahajan, Nitin Malik, Gaurav Balani, Sonam Sherpa and Subir Malik, was one of the main attractions of the three-day fest.

And the rockers, who closed the second day of the fest on Saturday, didn’t leave anyone disappointed. They captivated attendees with their approximately 40-minute concert.

Calling the audience “absolutely mind-blowing”, the band’s lead vocalist Nitin made the gig an interactive one. At one point, Nitin told them to simply sing ‘Hey’ after him. He also requested them to lift up their mobile phone and turn its light on for a photograph. The crowd did all that with a lot of enthusiasm.

And why not? After all, they entertained the audience with their popular tracks like “Am I dreaming” and “Whiskey blues”. Nitin even played an acoustic version of the band’s sought after number “But it rained”.

If the band mesmerized the crowd with Nitin’s powerful voice and the use of instruments like guitar, drums, violin and tabla, rapper Borkung Hrangkhawl, who hails from Tripura, blew everyone’s mind with his songs that highlighted many issues including racism faced by the people of northeast.

Dressed in black and grey casuals, the 29-year-old, explained each and every song before performing. For instance, before playing “Journey”, he told the audience: “We need to use our life properly. We might feel discouraged due to the ups and downs in our life, but we shouldn’t get disappointed.”

His heavy words won over the hearts of the crowd, which mostly consisted of young localites.

Hrangkhawl even got off the stage and shook hands with his fans.

Apart from music, there were plays and fashion shows too.

Using silks of Assam on outfits that were an amalgamation of the East and West, designer Pallavi Talukdar showcased an interesting collection for men and women.

Another designer named Kamal Lochan took inspiration from the northeast culture. Giving a twist to the Naga shawls, his creations were mostly in red, white and black. The headgear was eye-catching too.

“I used bamboo, wire and paper among other things to make the headgear. The collection is inspired from the northeast region, so I thought of having them along with the clothes,” he said.

The fest, which also has exhibitions of horticulture and handicraft products, and much more, was graced by the Union Agriculture Minister Radha Mohan Singh. After taking a look at the horticulture section, he even praised the organizers of the Fest for taking an initiative to help the farmers.

The festival, which is being organized by a socio-cultural thrust of Assam Trend MMS in association with Hotel & Restaurants Association of Assam, Assam Tourism, department of cultural affairs, government of Assam, and Ministry of Youth Affairs, government of India, will conclude on Sunday. (Natalia Ningthoujam, IANS)(Photo: www.soundbox.co.in)

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YouTube Becomes The Most Used Application For Music: Report

This report also shows the challenges the music community continues to face.

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YouTube, Google
The YouTube Music app is displayed on a mobile phone in Los Angeles. VOA

If you are listening to music, chances are you’re on YouTube.

A music consumer report by the industry’s global body IFPI published Tuesday found that 86 percent of us listen to music through on-demand streaming.

And nearly half that time, 47 percent is spent on YouTube.

Video as a whole accounted for 52 percent of the time we spent streaming music, posing challenges to such subscription services as Spotify and SoundCloud.

YouTube
The content-sharing platform is also adding a tool, thus, allowing creators to add or remove non-skippable advertisements in bulk. Pixabay

But while Spotify’s estimated annual revenue per user was $20 (17.5 euros), YouTube’s was less than a dollar.

The London-based IFPI issued a broader overview in April that found digital sales for the first time making up the majority of global revenues thanks to streaming.

The report published Tuesday looked into where and when we listen to music.

It found that three in four people globally use smartphones, with the rate among 16- to 24-year-olds reaching 94 percent.

The highest levels were recorded in India, where 96 percent of consumers used smartphones for music, including 99 percent of young adults.

YouTube
YouTube music will separate the movies and music section on the platform. Pixabay

But music does not end when we put away our phones, with 86 percent globally also listening to the radio.

Copyright infringement was still a big issue, with unlicensed music accounting for 38 percent of what was consumed around the world.

“This report also shows the challenges the music community continues to face — both in the form of the evolving threat of digital copyright infringement as well as in the failure to achieve fair compensation from some user-upload services,” said IFPI chief Frances Moore.

The report noted that “96% of consumers in China and 96% in India listen to licensed music.”

Also Read: Google Maps Gets A New Update That Lets You Access Music

It did not, however, say how many of those consumers also listened to music that infringed copyrights.

Overall, the average consumer spent 2.5 hours a day listening to music, with the largest share of it consumed while driving, the industry report said. (VOA)