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Delhi government to probe dengue death row

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Rout family. Photo Credit: http://indianexpress.com

By NewsGram Staff-Writer

The Delhi government will soon announce a magisterial inquiry into the 7-year-old Avinash Rout’s death considering the outrage that broke out after the same, according to reports.

Rout family. Photo Credit: http://indianexpress.com
Rout family. Photo Credit: http://indianexpress.com

The boy died of dengue this week after being denied admission to five hospitals in the city. He was admitted to a hospital in Tughlakabad later where he died on the 8th of September.

After cremating Avinash’s body, his parents jumped off the terrace of a four storey building.

According to relatives and friends, the government would be looking into the CCTV footage of the hospitals wherein Avinash was rejected medical help. Avinash was refused admission on September 7 to five hospitals.

A senior official said, “On Saturday, the government took Avinash’s treatment record from Batra hospital. The 50-page record also includes a case history from his treating doctor. It stated that the family had been referred from five private hospitals and mentioned their names. This is based on what the parents told doctors while admitting their son,” as quoted in the leading daily.

He further added that show-cause notices were issued to the hospitals only after the records were thoroughly checked.

The five hospitals — Moolchand, Max Saket, Akash hospital, Irene hospital, and Saket City hospital — were issued show-cause notices on Saturday seeking the reasons as to why the registration of the aforementioned hospitals should not be cancelled said the director of health services Sunil Bhatnagar.

The notice also asked as to why the hospital refuted the Delhi government’s order on August 28 to not deny admission to any dengue patient on account of lack of beds.

According to sources after Avinash’s treatment records will be looked over by the top Delhi government officials, matters of the probe would be submitted for a magisterial inquiry.

Max and Saket City hospitals said Avinash had not been treated in their emergency wards. “The CCTV footage will be the only way to corroborate these claims. Since the parents are dead, we will have to contact friends and relatives. This might be possible only under a magisterial probe,” explained the official, as quoted in a leading daily.

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20 Genes That Can Predict Severity of Dengue Identified

The genes could serve as a basis for a targeted therapy for dengue, Einav said - but that's far on the horizon

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www.nbcmiami.com

Researchers, including one of an Indian-origin, have identified 20 genes that can predict an individual’s likelihood of developing a severe form of dengue fever with about 80 per cent accuracy.

The team from Standford University in the US, identified a gene-expression pattern that predicts which people infected with dengue — a mosquito-borne virus that can cause fever and joint pain, among other symptoms — are at highest risk for developing a severe form of the illness.

Every year, between 200 million and 400 million people in tropical and subtropical regions of the world contract dengue fever, and about 500,000 of those cases are fatal.

For the most part, people with the disease recover after receiving some fluids and a few days’ rest, said Purvesh Khatri, Associate Professor at the varsity.

“But there’s a smaller subset of patients who get severe dengue, and right now we don’t know how to tell the difference,” Khatri said.

Aedes
Dengue is transmitted by the bite of the Aedes mosquito that typically attacks during day time. Pixabay

Anywhere from 5 to 20 per cent of dengue cases will advance to severe.

Currently, to diagnose severe dengue the doctors wait to observe specific symptoms and results of laboratory tests that typically emerge in the late stages of the disease.

“These practices are not nearly sensitive or accurate enough, and some patients end up admitted to the hospital unnecessarily, while others are discharged prematurely,” said Shirit Einav, Associate Professor.

Also Read- FSSAI Bans Use of Staple Pins in Tea Bags

The new set of genes, reported in the Cell Reports journal, can help identify predictive biomarkers that can help doctors reliably gauge the likelihood of severe dengue in patients who are newly symptomatic and use that information to provide more accurate care to help guide therapeutic clinical studies and, in the future, to guide treatment decisions.

The genes could serve as a basis for a targeted therapy for dengue, Einav said – but that’s far on the horizon. (IANS)