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Delhi government to probe dengue death row

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Rout family. Photo Credit: http://indianexpress.com

By NewsGram Staff-Writer

The Delhi government will soon announce a magisterial inquiry into the 7-year-old Avinash Rout’s death considering the outrage that broke out after the same, according to reports.

Rout family. Photo Credit: http://indianexpress.com
Rout family. Photo Credit: http://indianexpress.com

The boy died of dengue this week after being denied admission to five hospitals in the city. He was admitted to a hospital in Tughlakabad later where he died on the 8th of September.

After cremating Avinash’s body, his parents jumped off the terrace of a four storey building.

According to relatives and friends, the government would be looking into the CCTV footage of the hospitals wherein Avinash was rejected medical help. Avinash was refused admission on September 7 to five hospitals.

A senior official said, “On Saturday, the government took Avinash’s treatment record from Batra hospital. The 50-page record also includes a case history from his treating doctor. It stated that the family had been referred from five private hospitals and mentioned their names. This is based on what the parents told doctors while admitting their son,” as quoted in the leading daily.

He further added that show-cause notices were issued to the hospitals only after the records were thoroughly checked.

The five hospitals — Moolchand, Max Saket, Akash hospital, Irene hospital, and Saket City hospital — were issued show-cause notices on Saturday seeking the reasons as to why the registration of the aforementioned hospitals should not be cancelled said the director of health services Sunil Bhatnagar.

The notice also asked as to why the hospital refuted the Delhi government’s order on August 28 to not deny admission to any dengue patient on account of lack of beds.

According to sources after Avinash’s treatment records will be looked over by the top Delhi government officials, matters of the probe would be submitted for a magisterial inquiry.

Max and Saket City hospitals said Avinash had not been treated in their emergency wards. “The CCTV footage will be the only way to corroborate these claims. Since the parents are dead, we will have to contact friends and relatives. This might be possible only under a magisterial probe,” explained the official, as quoted in a leading daily.

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Philippines Bans World’s First Dengue Vaccine

Manila banned the sale, import and distribution of the Dengvaxia vaccine in February following the deaths

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Philippines, Ban, Dengue
FILE - Parents of children injected with Dengvaxia vaccine carry pictures of their loved ones as they attend a senate hearing regarding the vaccine at the Senate building in Manila, Philippines, Feb. 21, 2018. VOA

The Philippines stood firm Tuesday on its ban on the world’s first dengue vaccine while declaring a nationwide epidemic from the mosquito-borne disease that it said has killed hundreds this year.

Dengue incidence shot up 98% from a year earlier to 146,062 cases from January 1 to July 20, causing 662 deaths, Health Secretary Francisco Duque told a news conference in which he announced a “national dengue epidemic.”

Manila banned the sale, import and distribution of the Dengvaxia vaccine in February following the deaths of several dozen children who were among more than 700,000 people given shots in 2016 and 2017 in a government immunization campaign.

Duque said Thursday the government is studying an appeal to allow French pharmaceutical firm Sanofi to put the vaccine back in the Philippine market, but ruled out using the drug to combat the ongoing epidemic, which has hit small children hard.

Philippines, Ban, Dengue
The Philippines stood firm Tuesday on its ban on the world’s first dengue vaccine while declaring a nationwide epidemic from the mosquito-borne disease. Pixabay

“This vaccine does not squarely address the most vulnerable group which is the 5-9 years of age,” Duque said.

The vaccine, now licensed in 20 countries according to the World Health Organization, is approved for use for those aged nine and older.

Duque said the United Nations agency also advised Manila that the vaccine was “not recommended” as a response to an outbreak, and it was anyway “not cost-effective” with one dose costing a thousand pesos (about $20).

Dengue, or hemorrhagic fever, is the world’s most common mosquito-borne virus and infects an estimated 390 million people in more than 120 countries each year — killing more than 25,000 of them, according to the WHO.

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The Philippines in 2016 became the first nation to use Dengvaxia in a mass immunization program.

But controversy arose after Sanofi disclosed a year later that it could worsen symptoms for people not previously infected by the dengue virus.

The disclosure sparked a nationwide panic, with some parents alleging the vaccine killed their children.

Philippines, Ban, Dengue
Dengue incidence shot up 98% from a year earlier to 146,062 cases from January 1 to July 20, causing 662 deaths, Health Secretary Francisco Duque told a news conference. Pixabay

The controversy also triggered a vaccine scare that the government said was a factor behind measles outbreaks that the UN Children’s Fund said have killed more than 200 people this year.

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Duque on Tuesday called on other government agencies, schools, offices and communities get out of offices, homes and schools every afternoon to take part in efforts to “search and destroy mosquito breeding sites”. (VOA)