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Delhi Govt approaches High Court to challenge court’s order on the nursery admissions

The court had questioned the Delhi government's decision to impose the neighborhood restriction to only those schools that are built on Delhi Development Authority land

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Delhi High Court. Source- Wikimedia
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New Delhi, February 17, 2017: The AAP government on Thursday approached the DelhiHigh Court, challenging a single-judge order that stayed its nursery admissions notification compelling 298 private schools, built on public land, to adopt only neighborhood criteria.

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Filing an appeal before a division bench, Delhi government contended that the single judge was wrong and erroneous and sought setting aside of the February 14 order.

Justice Manmohan in his February 14 order said Delhigovernment’s January 7 notification was “arbitrary and discriminatory”.

The notification issued by the Department of Education of Delhi governmenthad made “distance” the primary criterion for admission of tiny tots.

The courthad questioned the Delhigovernment’s decision to impose the neighborhood restriction to only those schools that are built on DelhiDevelopment Authority land.

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The notification accorded priority to students living within a radius of one km from the school concerned. In case the seats remain vacant, those living within a distance of 3 km will get the chance for admission.

There are 1,400 private unaided schools in the capital, of which 298 are built on land allotted by the DDA.

The court’s judgment came on petitions filed by two school bodies — the Action Committee of Unaided Recognised Private Schools and Forum for Promotion of Quality Education along with a few parents to challenge the guidelines.

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Earlier, the high courtstayed the government’s nursery admission notification that made it mandatory for private unaided minority schools t o admit students, in the unreserved category, on the basis of neighborhood criteria. (IANS)

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Publishers Body Welcomes HC Order Lifting Non-NCERT Book Ban

"The ruling, in addition to providing convenience to children and parents, will also enable them to choose books depending on their preference,"

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Good education can reduce the impact of childhood abuse. Pixabay
Good education can reduce the impact of childhood abuse. Pixabay

The Association of Publishers in India (API) on Tuesday welcomed the Delhi High Court order which stipulated that sale of non-NCERT books must not be disallowed in CBSE-affiliated schools, calling the practice “discriminatory”.

“The court decision exemplifies the point that an ideal education system is the one that recognizes the role of multiple stakeholders and is learner-centric. The decision has been welcomed by not just students and parents but also by schools, private publishers, authors and others as it symbolizes ‘freedom of choice’ in education,” the representative body of publishers of academic texts said in a statement.

ALSO READ: The glorious tales of Chaar Sahibzaade to be included in NCERT syllabi

“The ruling, in addition to providing convenience to children and parents, will also enable them to choose books depending on their preference,” it said.

NCERT
Arguing that the sale of books, stationery and other items sold by the school be treated as “essential requirements”, the court last week in a decision refused to put a ban on these activities. Pixabay

 

In doing so, the court overturned the April 2017 injunction issued by the Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE), which asked affiliating schools not to indulge in “commercial” activities.

ALSO READ: App allowing free download of all NCERT books to be launched soon

The court said the availability of uniforms, non-NCERT reference books or even food items for sale only to the students of the school does not fall in the category of and cannot at all be considered as commercialization.

Earlier in its circular, the board had asked the schools to “desist from the unhealthy practice of coercing parents to buy textbooks, notebooks, stationery, uniforms, shoes, school bags etc from within the premise or from selected vendors only” and directed them to operate as doing “community service” as per the board by-laws.

Minister of State for Human Resource Development Upendra Kushwaha, in December last year, told Parliament that CBSE has not directed students or schools to buy or prescribe NCERT books only. (IANS)