Tuesday March 31, 2020
Home India Delhi govt di...

Delhi govt divides week between odd, even numbered cars

0
//

New Delhi: From January 1, odd numbered private vehicles will ply on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays in Delhi and even numbered cars on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays, it was announced on Sunday.

Public Works Department Minister Satyendra Jain said: “We need public participation for this initiative to succeed.

“The Delhi government will strengthen public transport from January 1,” Jain told the media here on the sidelines of a programme organised to pay tributes to Bhimrao Ambedkar on his 60th death anniversary.

The Aam Aadmi Party leader made no mention about Sundays.

A decision to ration road space was announced on Friday by the Arvind Kejriwal-led government to check rising pollution in the city.

Delhi has some 90 lakh registered vehicles, and about 1,500 are added on the roads every day.

Minister Jain said the restrictions would also apply to all ministers and bureaucrats, and that he would use his car on alternate days and go for car-pool the rest of the week.

Jain, who also holds health portfolio, said the current pollution levels in the city were an “emergency” situation, leading to various health issues.

The policy has drawn conflicted feedback from the public. A number of people are doubtful of this plan but Delhi government is all set to go forward with it.

(IANS)

Next Story

Researchers Develop New Framework To Select Best Trees For Fighting Air Pollution

Air pollution is responsible for one in every nine deaths each year and this could be intensified by projected population growth

0
Trees
In a study, published in the journal Climate and Atmospheric Science, researchers from the University of Surrey conducted a wide-ranging literature review of research on the effects of green infrastructure (trees and hedges) on air pollution. Pixabay

Researchers, including one of Indian-origin, have developed a new framework for selecting the best trees for fighting air pollution that originates from our roads.

In a study, published in the journal Climate and Atmospheric Science, researchers from the University of Surrey conducted a wide-ranging literature review of research on the effects of green infrastructure (trees and hedges) on air pollution.

“We are all waking up to the fact that air pollution and its impact on human health and the health of our planet is the defining issue of our time,” said study researcher Prashant Kumar, Professor at the University of Surrey in the UK. “Air pollution is responsible for one in every nine deaths each year and this could be intensified by projected population growth,” Kumar added.

The review found that there is ample evidence of green infrastructure’s ability to divert and dilute pollutant plumes or reduce outdoor concentrations of pollutants by direct capture, where some pollutants are deposited on plant surfaces.

Please follow NewsGram on Instagram for Updates from around the World!

As part of their critical review, the researchers identified a gap in information to help people – including urban planners, landscape architects and garden designers – make informed decisions on which species of vegetation to use and, crucially, what factors to consider when designing a green barrier. To address this knowledge gap, they identified 12 influential traits for 61 tree species that make them potentially effective barriers against pollution.

Beneficial plant properties include small leaf size, high foliage density, long in-leaf periods (e.g. evergreen or semi-evergreen), and micro-characteristics such as leaf hairiness. Generally detrimental aspects of plants for air quality include wind pollination and biogenic volatile organic compound emissions.

Air Pollution, Global Warming, Mask, Doctor, Protection
Researchers, including one of Indian-origin, have developed a new framework for selecting the best trees for fighting air pollution that originates from our roads. Pixabay

In the study, the team emphasised that the effectiveness of a plant is determined by its environmental context – whether, for example, it will be used in a deep (typical of a city commercial centre) or shallow (typical of a residential road) street canyon or in an open road environment.

To help concerned citizens with complex decisions, such as which tree is best for a road outside a school in a medium-sized street canyon, the research team has also developed a plant selection framework. “The use of green infrastructure as physical barriers between ourselves and pollutants originating from our roads is one promising way we can protect ourselves from the devastating impact of air pollution,” Kumar said.

ALSO READ: Tesla To Reduce Number of On-Site Workers at its Naveda Gigafactory Amidst Coronavirus Concerns

“We hope that our detailed guide to vegetation species selection and our contextual advice on how to plant and use green infrastructure is helpful to everyone looking to explore this option for combatting pollution,” he added. (IANS)