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Delhi hospital bed-population ratio 50 percent below norms

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Image courtesy The Hindu
Image courtesy The Hindu

New Delhi: The hospital bed-population ratio in Delhi during 2014 was almost half the prescribed level, reveals the Economic Survey of Delhi 2014-15 released on Wednesday.

The World Health Organization recommends five hospital beds per thousand of population.

But in the national capital, the ratio is 2.71 per thousand in 2014 — up from 2.25 in 2004. In 2014, Delhi had 48,096 hospital beds for its 1,77,37,344 people.

The per capita expenditure on health in Delhi has gone up from Rs.1,696 in 2013-14 to Rs.1,936 in 2014-15.

According to the survey, Delhi has 95 hospitals, 1,389 dispensaries, 267 maternity homes, 937 polyclinics and 16 medical colleges.

About 82 per cent of the total births were institutional in 2013, while Delhi also enjoys a high life expectancy of 72 years, as compared to the national average of 68.

(IANS)

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Experts Say Measles Victims Dropped Below 100,000 in 2016

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Measles Victims Dropped
Foriza Begum, background, a newly arrived Rohingya Muslim from Myanmar, reacts to her daughter Nosmin Fatima's scream as she receives a vaccination to prevent measles and rubella at a makeshift medical center in Teknaf, Bangladesh. VOA
  • Latest reports of WHO, UNICEF, and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say the rate of deaths from measles has dropped.
  • As per experts, a number of people who died from measles in 2016 were about 90,000, compared to 550,000 in 2000.

The World Health Organization, UNICEF, and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say the rate of deaths from measles has dropped 84 percent since the beginning of a global vaccination campaign in 2000.

Experts say the number of people who died from the disease in 2016 was about 90,000, compared to more than 550,000 deaths in 2000. This marks the first time that worldwide measles deaths have fallen to less than 100,000 per year.

Robert Linkins, of the Measles and Rubella Initiative at the CDC, said in a statement that “saving an average of 1.3 million lives per year through vaccine is an incredible achievement and makes a world free of measles seem possible, even probable, in our lifetime.”

Since 2000, some 5.5 billion doses of measles vaccine have been administered to children through routine immunization services and mass vaccination campaigns. The disease is contagious through air particles and can spread quickly. The disease kills more people every year than any other vaccine-preventable disease.

But the WHO says the world is still far from reaching regional measles elimination goals. Since 2009, officials have managed to deliver a first dose of the vaccine to 85 percent of the babies who need it, but there has been no improvement in that rate in eight years. And only 64 percent of the affected population has gotten the second dose, which comes when a child is four or five years old.

The WHO says “far too many children” — about 20.8 million — have not had their first vaccine dose. Most of those children live in Nigeria, India, Pakistan, Indonesia, Ethiopia and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

The disease puts children at risk of developing complications such as pneumonia, diarrhea, encephalitis, and blindness.(VOA)

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