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Delhi hospital treats 41-year-old man with extremely rare tumour-induced Bone condition

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Operating theatre in India, Wikimedia Commons
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New Delhi, March 5, 2017: Doctors here have successfully treated a 41-year-old man with an extremely rare tumour-induced condition that caused bone fragility, fractures and left him wheelchair-bound.

Tumour-induced osteomalacia is an extremely rare disorder where benign small soft tissue or bone tumours develop in the body and start secreting a substance that inhibits the absorption of phosphates, causing a cascade of biochemical abnormalities including extremely fragile bones.

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“So rare is this condition that many doctors fail to get to the root of it. A majority of these tumours are located in the extremities (skin, muscles, and bones) or around the head, but they may occur in almost any part of the body. These tumours are slow growing and often remain hidden or undetected until clinical features reach a fairly advanced stage,” Endocrinologist at Venkateshwar Hospital in Dwarka Deep Dutta said in a statement on Saturday.

Progressive weakness in legs over three years coupled with a fracture had left Ravi Sharma (name changed) wheelchair-bound.

Doctors found that he had extremely low serum levels of phosphorus (1mg/dl) — key structural component of bone apart from calcium — in urine, which led to skeletal weakness and fractures.

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An FDG (fluorodeoxyglucose)-PET scan confirmed the presence of tumour-induced osteomalacia at the lower end of the femur bone and later a CT-scan revealed an extremely small lesion of 1 cm diameter, and was successfully removed by the doctors.

“Within 24 hours of surgery, we found the patient’s phosphorus levels improved to 3.3mg/dl, and he regained his physical strength and was able to start walking with support. We have reduced Ravi’s oral phosphate replacement dose significantly and we expect he will be totally off phosphate replacement in the next few days. All biochemical and clinical features reverted to normal when the tumour was removed,” Dutta said. (IANS)

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Asthma In Childhood Can Trigger COPD Later: Lancet

Interventions to maximise lung growth in early childhood might modify the risk of COPD in older age, they noted

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Children with asthma uses inhaler to relieve some of the symptoms. Wikimedia Commons

While smoking remains the biggest risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), childhood illnesses such as asthma, bronchitis, pneumonia, allergic rhinitis and eczema also amplify the disease, say researchers.

Three-quarters of COPD cases have their origins in poor lung function pathways beginning in childhood, according to a cohort study published in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine journal.

Asthma can cause severe damage to one’s lungs. VOA

A second study in the journal suggests that there could be a window of opportunity during childhood to reduce the risk of poor lung function in later life.

“These findings highlight the importance of preventing both early life adverse exposures that could lead to poorer lung growth and adult risk factors contributing to accelerated lung decline,” says Professor Shyamali Dharmage from School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Australia. COPD is expected to be the third-largest cause of death globally by 2030. “It is important that we identify its key causes so that this burden can be reduced,” Dharmage added.

Also Read: Smoking during pregnancy linked to asthma severity in kids

Childhood asthma can trigger COPD in later life. IANS

Reduction of maternal smoke exposure and personal smoking and promotion of immunisation are identified as public health targets to prevent poor lung function pathways.

“Doctors and patients with asthma should be made aware of the potential long-term implications of non-optimal asthma control throughout life, and this should be investigated in future research,” the study authors noted. In the first study, 2,438 participants from the Tasmanian Longitudinal Health Study (Australia) were tracked from childhood to the age of 53.

In the second study, 2,632 participants were tracked from birth to 24 years old and their lung function was measured. In the second study, the authors found that around three-quarters of infants aged one to six months with poor lung function improved throughout their childhood, indicating a window of opportunity to increase lung function and potentially reduce risk of COPD in later life.

Other than chronic diseases, lifestyle habits like smoking causes cancer too. Pixabay
Earlier smoking was the most common cause of COPD. Pixabay

Interventions to maximise lung growth in early childhood might modify the risk of COPD in older age, they noted. IANS