Saturday March 23, 2019

Delhi hospital treats 41-year-old man with extremely rare tumour-induced Bone condition

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Operating theatre in India, Wikimedia Commons

New Delhi, March 5, 2017: Doctors here have successfully treated a 41-year-old man with an extremely rare tumour-induced condition that caused bone fragility, fractures and left him wheelchair-bound.

Tumour-induced osteomalacia is an extremely rare disorder where benign small soft tissue or bone tumours develop in the body and start secreting a substance that inhibits the absorption of phosphates, causing a cascade of biochemical abnormalities including extremely fragile bones.

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“So rare is this condition that many doctors fail to get to the root of it. A majority of these tumours are located in the extremities (skin, muscles, and bones) or around the head, but they may occur in almost any part of the body. These tumours are slow growing and often remain hidden or undetected until clinical features reach a fairly advanced stage,” Endocrinologist at Venkateshwar Hospital in Dwarka Deep Dutta said in a statement on Saturday.

Progressive weakness in legs over three years coupled with a fracture had left Ravi Sharma (name changed) wheelchair-bound.

Doctors found that he had extremely low serum levels of phosphorus (1mg/dl) — key structural component of bone apart from calcium — in urine, which led to skeletal weakness and fractures.

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An FDG (fluorodeoxyglucose)-PET scan confirmed the presence of tumour-induced osteomalacia at the lower end of the femur bone and later a CT-scan revealed an extremely small lesion of 1 cm diameter, and was successfully removed by the doctors.

“Within 24 hours of surgery, we found the patient’s phosphorus levels improved to 3.3mg/dl, and he regained his physical strength and was able to start walking with support. We have reduced Ravi’s oral phosphate replacement dose significantly and we expect he will be totally off phosphate replacement in the next few days. All biochemical and clinical features reverted to normal when the tumour was removed,” Dutta said. (IANS)

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The World Looks Forward To Eradication Of Hepatitis C By 2030

Offering direct-acting antivirals to all patients at the time of diagnosis could prevent 640,000 deaths from liver cancer and cirrhosis by 2030

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the new Hepatitis B vaccine for adults is called Heplisav-B.
The team found that implementing comprehensive blood safety and infection control measures was estimated to reduce the number of new infections in 2030 by 58 per cent.

Improvements in screening, prevention and treatment particularly in high-burden countries, such as India, China and Pakistan, can avert 15.1 million new hepatitis C infections and 1.5 million cirrhosis and liver cancer deaths globally by 2030.

Globally, it is estimated that 71 million individuals are chronically infected with the hepatitis C virus, that attacks the liver and leads to inflammation.

The virus was also responsible for over 475,000 deaths in 2015.

Viral hepatitis
World Health Organization poster for Hepatitis Campaign. VOA

To achieve the big reductions, there is need to implement comprehensive blood safety and infection control measures, extend harm reduction services (such as opioid substitution therapy and needle and syringe programmes) and replace older treatments with direct-acting antivirals in all countries.

Moreover, adding screening to these interventions can help diagnose 90 per cent of people with hepatitis C and offer treatment by 2030, according to the study published in The Lancet journal.

The estimates equal to an 80 per cent reduction in incidence and a 60 per cent reduction in deaths as compared to 2015.

Injection and medicines
Hepatitis are the commonly transmitted hepatotropic viruses transmitted due to poor hygiene, contaminated food and drinking water, poor sanitation, Pixabay

But, it narrowly misses the elimination targets set by the World Health Organisation (WHO) — to reduce mortality by 65 per cent — and would instead be attained by 2032, the researchers said.

“Even though it narrowly falls short of the WHO targets for 2030, the impact our estimates suggest would be a tremendous stride forwards,” said lead author Professor Alastair Heffernan, from UK’s Imperial College London.

The team found that implementing comprehensive blood safety and infection control measures was estimated to reduce the number of new infections in 2030 by 58 per cent.

Hepatitis C Blood Virus [HCV]. Photo Credit: michelsonmedical.org
Extending harm reduction services to 40 per cent of people who inject drugs could reduce the number of new infections by a further 7 percentage points.

Together, this would prevent 14.1 million new infections by 2030.

But, offering direct-acting antivirals to all patients at the time of diagnosis could prevent 640,000 deaths from liver cancer and cirrhosis by 2030, the researchers noted.

Also Read: Major Breakthrough Made In The Treatment Of Ebola Virus

“Achieving such reductions requires a massive screening programme and demands a rapid increase in new treatment courses in the short term — namely, 51.8 million courses of direct-acting antivirals by 2030,” Heffernan said. (IANS)