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Delhi Public Library signs MoU with Indian Public Library Movement (IPLM) to improve Overall Functioning of its Outlets

Books, Pixabay

May 19, 2017: The Delhi Public Library has signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with Indian Public Library Movement (IPLM) to improve the overall functioning of its outlets and make them more relevant in the fast-changing times.

The MoU was exchanged in the presence of the Minister of State (Independent Charge) for Culture Mahesh Sharma, who expressed his happiness with the efforts to improve the libraries and hoped that the MoU will bring about a positive change.

The objectives of the MoU are to clearly identify the roles and responsibilities of all the parties as they relate to implement efforts in repositioning different libraries of Delhi Public Library. The understanding is aimed at enabling them to serve citizens better as community engagement, information, knowledge and resource centres.

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The MoU also intends to “strengthen the capacities of the libraries and librarians,” so that they serve the real time needs, especially of the youth. The initiative is set to propel time to time training of librarians on various aspects of revitalisation of libraries and library services.

Introduction of new services in the public libraries are also on the cards as children corner, space for differently abled people, digital resources, multimedia educational content and various outreach programmes also find mention in the understanding.

The Indian Public Library Movement (IPLM), supported by the Global Libraries initiative of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and hosted by Nasscom Foundation, has been conceived to re-vitalise the Indian public libraries and bring them back into the mainstream as inclusive knowledge and information centres catering to the 21st century information needs of communities across India. (IANS)

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Good education can curb childhood abuse effects: Study

Parent reports and self-reports of the team showed criminal and antisocial behaviour among the childhood abuse victims

Good education can reduce the impact of childhood abuse. Pixabay
Good education can reduce the impact of childhood abuse. Pixabay
  • A good education may help reduce effects of childhood abuse
  • Abuse which children suffer in young age can make them criminals
  • Poor grades can shift students towards crime too

Good grades and proper schooling may help in protecting victims of childhood abuse from indulging in criminal behaviour in adulthood, a study says.

The emotional and sexual abuse that some kids endure during their childhood can lead them to commit crimes later in life. But when they achieve good grades in childhood and complete their academics, the likelihood of indulging in criminal behaviour declines significantly.

By funding K-12 Public Schools, Qatar Foundation is promoting Arabic in American schools. Pixabay.
Bad education can lead to children moving towards committing crimes. Pixabay.

“Child abuse is a risk factor for later antisocial behaviour,” said Todd Herrenkohl, Professor at the University of Michigan in the US.

“Education and academic achievement can lessen the risk of crime for all youth, including those who have been abused (encountered stress and adversity),” Herrenkohl added.

However, for some children who are weak in academic performance and get suspended in grades seven to nine, the offending habits and antisocial behaviour tends to stay with them even later in life, the researchers said.

Also Read: Strong Relationships May Counter Health Effects of Childhood Abuses

The study, published in the Journal of Interpersonal Violence, noted that the primary prevention of child abuse is a critical first step to reduce antisocial behaviour at the transition from adolescence into adulthood. Researchers followed 356 people from childhood (ages 18 months to 6 years), school-age (8 years), adolescent (18 years) and adulthood (36 years).

Child abuse can make children criminals. VOA

Parent-child interactions measured various types of abuse and neglect, and responses also factored educational experiences and criminal behaviour against others or property. Parent reports and self-reports of the team showed criminal and antisocial behaviour among the childhood abuse victims.

“Strategies focused on helping school professionals become aware of the impacts of child abuse and neglect are critical to building supportive environments that promote resilience and lessen the risk for antisocial behaviour,” Herrenkohl said. IANS