Thursday April 25, 2019

Delhi records highest dengue cases as national count doubles

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credit: www.radiotnn.com
credit: www.topnews.in
credit: www.topnews.in

By NewsGram Staff-Writer

New Delhi: Number of dengue cases reported in the country went up to 19,704 this year, which is double of the last year’s figures. By the end of August, cases have already crossed 2014’s count of 10,097.

The alarming data also revealed that 41 people have lost their lives till now. Last year 37 deaths were reported due to dengue. However some sort of relief has come in the form of falling fatality rate which has gone down to 0.20 percent.

According to a Health Ministry statement, fatality rate last peaked high in 1996, when casualties rose to 3 percent.

The report also stated that the most number of dengue cases were reported from Delhi with 1,259 cases. Next was Bangalore with 1,139 cases followed by Greater Mumbai and Kolkata with 306 and 187 cases, respectively.

Arunachal’s East Siang district recorded the most number of dengue cases (district wise) in 2015. Out of 1,681 cases reported in Arunachal Pradesh, 1,618 came from East Siang alone. Among other districts, Chittoor in Arunachal had 761 cases, while Thiruvananthapuram (602 cases) and Kasargod (443 cases) comes next in the list.

Looking for a taking major initiative on the issue, the Union Health Ministry is planning to ban rapid diagnostic test kits for dengue. The ministry is in talks with Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) for taking the kit off the market because of its poor error rate. Reportedly, the diagnostic test kit falsely indicates majority of cases as positive which only creates confusion among dengue suspects.

Talking about the present scenario in hospitals, Director General, Health Services, Dr. Jagdish Prasad said, “At present hospitals have to notify only those cases in which test has been performed by IgM or Elisa. The rapid test kit sometimes indicates wrong result in as many as 50 percent cases. We are consulting ICMR for issuing a notification to ban the kit.”

Next Story

1bn People Could be Exposed to Dengue, Zika by 2080

Dengue is the fastest growing mosquito-borne disease across the world today, causing nearly 400 million infections every year, according to the World Health Organisation (WHO)

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Aedes
Dengue is transmitted by the bite of the Aedes mosquito that typically attacks during day time. Pixabay

Global warming could expose as many as a billion people to mosquito-borne diseases including dengue and Zika by 2080, says a new study that examined temperature changes on a monthly basis worldwide.

The study found that with the rise in temperature, dengue is expected to have a year-round transmission in the tropics and seasonal risks almost everywhere else. A greater intensity of infections is also predicted.

To understand, researchers from Georgetown University in the US looked at temperatures month by month to project the risks through 2050 and 2080.

While almost all of the world’s population could be exposed at some point in the next 50 years, places like Europe, North America, and high elevations in the tropics that used to be too cold for the viruses will face new diseases like dengue.

On the other hand, in areas with the worst climate increase, including west Africa and southeast Asia, serious reductions are expected for the Aedes albopictus mosquito, most noticeably in southeast Asia and west Africa, revealed the study, published in the journal PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.

Dengue vaccine.
A Manila Health officer shows off a pair of vials of the anti-dengue vaccine Dengvaxia after being recalled from local government health centers Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2017 in Manila, Philippines. The World Health Organization says the first-ever vaccine for dengue needs to be dealt with in “a much safer way,” meaning that the shot should mostly be given to people who have previously been infected with the disease. VOA

Both Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes can carry dengue, chikunguyna and Zika viruses, as well as at least a dozen other emerging diseases.

“Climate change is the largest and most comprehensive threat to global health security,” said Colin J. Carlson, postdoctoral candidate in Georgetown University in the US.

“The risk of disease transmission is a serious problem, even over the next few decades,” Carlson added.

Also Read- Researchers Probing if Tobacco’s Native Forms Less Harmful

Dengue is the fastest growing mosquito-borne disease across the world today, causing nearly 400 million infections every year, according to the World Health Organisation (WHO).

The 2018 data from the National Vector Borne Disease Control Programme (NVBDCP) and National Health Profile showed that cases of dengue increased 300 per cent — from less than 60,000 cases in 2009, it increased to 188,401 in 2017. (IANS)