Monday April 6, 2020

Delhi records highest dengue cases as national count doubles

0
//
credit: www.radiotnn.com
credit: www.topnews.in
credit: www.topnews.in

By NewsGram Staff-Writer

New Delhi: Number of dengue cases reported in the country went up to 19,704 this year, which is double of the last year’s figures. By the end of August, cases have already crossed 2014’s count of 10,097.

The alarming data also revealed that 41 people have lost their lives till now. Last year 37 deaths were reported due to dengue. However some sort of relief has come in the form of falling fatality rate which has gone down to 0.20 percent.

According to a Health Ministry statement, fatality rate last peaked high in 1996, when casualties rose to 3 percent.

The report also stated that the most number of dengue cases were reported from Delhi with 1,259 cases. Next was Bangalore with 1,139 cases followed by Greater Mumbai and Kolkata with 306 and 187 cases, respectively.

Arunachal’s East Siang district recorded the most number of dengue cases (district wise) in 2015. Out of 1,681 cases reported in Arunachal Pradesh, 1,618 came from East Siang alone. Among other districts, Chittoor in Arunachal had 761 cases, while Thiruvananthapuram (602 cases) and Kasargod (443 cases) comes next in the list.

Looking for a taking major initiative on the issue, the Union Health Ministry is planning to ban rapid diagnostic test kits for dengue. The ministry is in talks with Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) for taking the kit off the market because of its poor error rate. Reportedly, the diagnostic test kit falsely indicates majority of cases as positive which only creates confusion among dengue suspects.

Talking about the present scenario in hospitals, Director General, Health Services, Dr. Jagdish Prasad said, “At present hospitals have to notify only those cases in which test has been performed by IgM or Elisa. The rapid test kit sometimes indicates wrong result in as many as 50 percent cases. We are consulting ICMR for issuing a notification to ban the kit.”

Next Story

Health Ministry Issues Fresh Guidelines for Disinfecting Public Places

This is how to disinfect your office in corona times

0
Disinfecting health
The Health Ministry has issued fresh guidelines for disinfecting public places including offices in areas reporting COVID-19. IANS

As a preventive measure against new coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, the Health Ministry has issued fresh guidelines for disinfecting public places including offices in areas reporting COVID-19.

For ease of implementation, the guideline divided these areas into (i) indoor areas, (ii) outdoor areas and (iii) public toilets.

According to the ministry, outdoor areas have less risk than indoor areas due to air currents and exposure to sunlight. Indoor areas such as office spaces, including conference rooms should be cleaned every evening after office hours or early in the morning before the rooms are occupied.

Please follow NewsGram on Instagram to get updates on the latest news

The guidelines said that prior to cleaning, the worker should wear disposable rubber boots, gloves (heavy duty), and a triple-layer mask. All indoor areas such as entrance lobbies, corridors and staircases, elevators, office rooms, meeting rooms, cafeteria should be mopped with a disinfectant with one per cent sodium hypochlorite or phenolic disinfectants.

Disinfecting health
The guidelines for disinfecting said that prior to cleaning, the worker should wear disposable rubber boots, gloves (heavy duty), and a triple-layer mask. Pixabay

“Frequently touched areas like tabletops, chair handles, pens, diary files, keyboards, mouse, mouse pad, tea/coffee, dispensing machines etc. should especially be cleaned,” said the guidelines.

Also, high contact surfaces such elevator buttons, equipment like telephone, printers/scanners, and other office machines should be cleaned twice daily by mopping with a linen/absorbable cloth soaked in one per cent sodium hypochlorite. Hand-sanitizing stations should be installed in office premises (especially at the entry) and near high contact surfaces.

Please follow NewsGram on Facebook to get updates on the latest news

In addition, all employees should consider cleaning the work area in front of them with a disinfecting wipe prior to use and sit one seat further away from others, if possible, according to the guidelines. In outdoor areas, such as bus stops, railway platforms, parks, roads, etc., cleaning and disinfection efforts should be targeted to frequently-touched contaminated surfaces.

For public toilets, sanitary workers must use a separate set of cleaning equipment for toilets (mops, nylon scrubber) and a separate set for sink and commode). They should always wear disposable protective gloves while cleaning a toilet.

Also Read- Here’s Why Autism Spectrum Disorder More Common in Boys

According to the guidelines, workers must disinfect all cleaning equipment after use and before using in other area and buckets by soaking in bleach solution in hot water.

Wear appropriate Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) while carrying out cleaning and disinfection work, it added. (IANS)