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Delhi’s water woes: How AAP plans to adapt Singapore’s ‘water re-use model’

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By Newsgram Staff Writer

Water Scarcity would become a history in Delhi as Singapore water re-use model, in which waste water is filtered and used again, is being studied to be replicated here, Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal said on Monday.

Interacting with reporters at Rashtrapati Bhavan after attending the Padma awards presentation ceremony, Kejriwal said his government has already sent teams to Singapore to study its water supply model.

“Singapore does not have any water of its own. Almost 95 per cent of water comes from outside,” he said, adding it has developed a system where used water is filtered and re-used and in such a way water used in toilets goes to toilets after it is filtered and similarly waste water from kitchen goes to kitchen again.

“We have been studying how it is done. We plan to begin with 10 to 15 pilot projects on the same in Delhi in a month or so,” he said.

The water quality, after it is filtered, is as good as of mineral water, Kejriwal said.

If it could work in Delhi, “which I think it would”, there would be no water shortage in the city, the chief minister said.

The concept of recycling wastewater certainly isn’t new, with long-running initiatives already well underway in Israel, Spain, Scandinavian countries and the US. But with water re-use model, Singapore has quickly gained an international reputation for efficient recycling of wastewater. The initiative already supplies around one third of the country’s water demand, and that number is expected to grow to more than half by the year 2060.

Singapore’s water project has become an important model for the entire Asia Pacific region. Australia, too, has been purifying wastewater for years, though partially for different reasons.

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Experts Claim, Climate Change Can Affect Food, Water Security

Lauding IIT-Mandi for hosting the workshop, Rajeevan said the Himalayas were one of the world's sensitive hotspots to climate change along with the Artic region.

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Ramesh P. Singh, workshop Coordinator and visiting faculty at IIT-Mandi, said: "We have to understand climate change and its impact as it is very important for the future generations." Pixabay

Climate change can affect the food, water and energy security of a region, Ministry of Earth Sciences Secretary M. Rajeevan said here on Friday.

“Climate is changing and global warming is happening due to the release of greenhouse gases. In many parts of the world, including India, the effects of climate change are being seen especially in mountain regions like Mandi,” he said.

He was speaking at the Indian Institute of Technology-Mandi that hosted an International Workshop on Climate Change and Extreme Events in the Indian Himalayan Region.

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In many parts of the world, including India, the effects of climate change are being seen especially in mountain regions like Mandi,” he said. Pixabay

The workshop was aimed at understanding the effects of climate change, melting of glaciers, increased frequency of extreme events, atmospheric pollution and pollution due to the burning of crop residue in the Himalayan region and applications of remote sensing.

Lauding IIT-Mandi for hosting the workshop, Rajeevan said the Himalayas were one of the world’s sensitive hotspots to climate change along with the Artic region.

“The Himalayan region is experiencing increasing variability in weather in the last many years. This could lead to further snow accumulation over this region and more research is needed to understand this phenomenon. By studying data, there is also evidence that the number of extreme warm days and nights has increased in this Himalayan region, which are clear effects of global warming.”

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The workshop was aimed at understanding the effects of climate change, melting of glaciers, increased frequency of extreme events, atmospheric pollution and pollution due to the burning of crop residue in the Himalayan region and applications of remote sensing. Pixabay

In his presidential address, IIT-Mandi Director Timothy A. Gonsalves said: “We have 15 professors from six different disciplines in IIT-Mandi who are working on climate change. This workshop saw the participation of faculty from various disciplines and is an example of the inter-disciplinary and collaborative environment on campus.”

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Ramesh P. Singh, workshop Coordinator and visiting faculty at IIT-Mandi, said: “We have to understand climate change and its impact as it is very important for the future generations.”

The workshop has participation from all over India, besides Europe, and the US with over 90 speakers from across India. (IANS)