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Dip in Manufacturing Sector Leads To Fall in U.S. Dollar

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employment growth rate, wages
The trend in wage gains has slowed from late 2018 when wages were rising at their fastest rate in a decade. Pixabay

The US dollar decreased in late trading on Friday, as investors digested a mixed batch of US economic data, amid worries over slowing activities in the manufacturing sector.

In late New York trading, the euro increased to $1.1194 from $1.1175 in the previous session, and the British pound rose to $1.3164 from $1.3027 in the previous session, Xinhua news agency reported.

The Australian dollar was up to $0.7014 from $0.6997.

jobs

The disappointing data has partially offset robust US job statistics in April. Pixabay

The US dollar bought 111.09 Japanese yen, lower than 111.49 Japanese yen of the previous session. The US dollar fell to 1.0174 Swiss franc from 1.0193 Swiss franc, and it decreased to 1.3427 Canadian dollars from 1.3470 Canadian dollars.

The Institute for Supply Management’s non-manufacturing index declined to 55.5 per cent in April, 0.6 percentage point down from 56.1 per cent in March, which marks the slowest reading since August 2017, said the not-for-profit professional supply management organization on Friday.

money
The dollar index, which measures the greenback against six major peers, decreased 0.31 per cent at 97.5208 in late trading. Pixabay

The reading fell far short of an estimate of 57.5 per cent by economists polled by MarketWatch.

The disappointing data has partially offset robust US job statistics in April.

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US total non-farm payroll employment increased by 263,000 in April, and the unemployment rate declined to 3.6 per cent, said the US Bureau of Labor Statistics on Friday, pointing to a bullish labor market.

The dollar index, which measures the greenback against six major peers, decreased 0.31 per cent at 97.5208 in late trading. (IANS)

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Usage of Unaccounted Cash Still Prevalent in Market: Report

Large cash transactions still present in resale realty market

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Unaccounted cash
Significant usage of unaccounted cash is still prevalent in the secondarly real estate market. Pixabay

It has been three years since demonetisation which was implemented with the aim to curb and eradicate black money. But according to a report released on Wednesday, significant usage of unaccounted cash is still prevalent in the secondarily real estate market.

The report prepared by Anarock Property Consultants said that up to 30 per cent of the total transaction value in the secondary or resale residential maket in India can still be paid in cash.

However, the primary sales market in tier-I cities offer the least scope for unaccounted wealth in property deals, it said.

“Demonetization in November 2016 sent Indian residential real estate — till then a preferred laundromat for unaccounted wealth — into an almost terminal tailspin. Even three years after DeMo, the battle is only half-won,” said Anuj Puri, Chairman Aof Anarock Property Consultants.

“The secondary or resale residential real estate market still accommodates black money; at least 30 per cent of the total cost of resale property can still be paid in cash. While more and more buyers and sellers prefer official payment routes as a matter of principle, many still use the resale property market to launder untaxed cash,” he added.

Cash in market
Many buyers use the resale property market to launder untaxed cash. Pixabay

As per the report, while the trend in the Mumbai Metropolitan Region (MMR) and the National Capital Region (NCR), which are historically notorious for black money in real estate, has tamed considerably in primary sales, their resale property markets still see cash components.

As much as 20-25 per cent of the total resale property cost can still be “adjusted” with black money, it said, adding that in Bengaluru, Pune and Hyderabad, the prevalence of transparent payment routes, even on the resale market, is much higher.

“Unlike the primary sales market, the resale market still lacks strict regulations, making it easier for buyers and sellers to use cash components.

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Also, the primary sales market involves developers with a reputation to protect, while a resale property transaction involves two individuals. The pricing of resale properties also lacks transparency,” the report said.

In the case of direct sales by developers, there are readily-available pricing benchmarks, while in the secondary market, a seller can inflate the price of a property based on location, added features and so on without stating on the books. (IANS)