Tuesday March 19, 2019

Do you Know? A Park in Thailand represents the Hell of Buddhism

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Wang Saen Suk Hell Garden. Image Source: en.wikipedia.org
  • In Buddhism, a sinner remains in hell until his/her sins are not spent by punishment
  • Naraka has 8 large pits and each pit have 16 sub areas forming a total of 136 pits altogether
  • In the Park, corrupts are given the heads of pig, and thieves are given head of birds and then warden axe them off

Buddhism is a religion of peace but as hell and heaven go side by side, it has its own representation of horror as well. Wang Saen Suk Hell Garden or Thailand’s horror park represents the Hell as described in Buddhism. Known as ‘Naraka’, this park in Thailand represents the hell of Buddhism.

The park is well known for sending chills down your spine. Located in Saen Suk village of Thailand- located 100 kilometers from Bangkok, the park features a statue of Lord Buddha at the entrance with a sign “Welcome to Hell”. The statue of Buddha is followed by two devils- a man and a woman.

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In Buddhism, a sinner remains in hell until his/her sins are not spent by punishment. According to Traiphum Phra Ruang, a newly dead person is taken to Phya Yom, who will tell your fate after comparing the good deeds and bad deeds.

Phya Yom. Image Source: thailanguagetuition.co.uk
Phya Yom. Image Source: thailanguagetuition.co.uk

According to it, Naraka has 8 large pits and each pit has 16 sub areas forming a total of 136 pits altogether. Each sin has a separate pit and a separate punishment. The wardens were found wearing Buddhist clothes and are Buddhist monks. The statues in the park are of size of a human being.

The park depicts punishment of each sin. For example, a woman is penetrated with a spear to compensate for birth control and injection. Cheating is punished by removal of eyes. A rapist is punished by shoving tridents at his genitals. The murderers are punished with a spear penetrating through their heart. For regular alcoholics, boiling oil is poured down their throats. Those who undermine Buddhism have their head axed. Corrupts are given the heads of pig, and thieves are given head of birds and then wardens axe them off. Some statues shows that they burn sinners in boiling oil.

Punishment scene (source: www.atlasobscura.com)
Punishment scene (source: www.atlas obscura.com)

The most interesting part of the garden is a donation box located at the end of the park. It states that whoever gives alms and yellow robes to Buddhist monks will be born in the religious period of Bodhisattva. Near each sin, there is a donation box, which encourages forgiveness with the help of charity.

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Despite of depicting punishments, the park also encourages a sense of being good in an individual. It shows that good people are rewarded with good food, flower and also Lord Buddha smiling over prayer of sinners. The park also accompanies shrines of Lord Shiva sitting on Kailash mountain.

-This report is compiled by a staff-writer at NewsGram.

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  • Vrushali Mahajan

    Oh my god! This is something really weird. You cannot depict hell (if it exists) so openly. But in a way it refrains people from doing bad if they fear god

  • Joey Anderson

    Thais are spooky race wish I never went to Thailand. And wish they would all die and burn in hell

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  • Vrushali Mahajan

    Oh my god! This is something really weird. You cannot depict hell (if it exists) so openly. But in a way it refrains people from doing bad if they fear god

  • Joey Anderson

    Thais are spooky race wish I never went to Thailand. And wish they would all die and burn in hell

Next Story

Thailand’s Election Date Set For Late March, Fiver Years After The Coup

On Tuesday, Thanathorn told VOA the election was just a small first step in what would be a protracted struggle to wrestle power

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Thai Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha gestures the Thai way shortly after accepting the ASEAN Summit and Related Summits' hosting and chairmanship for next year in Thailand from Singaporean Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong, in Singapore, Nov. 15, 2018. VOA

Nearly five years after the military stormed to power in yet another coup, Thailand has finally announced an official election date scheduled for late March.

It comes with mounting defiance to the army’s tight control over freedom of expression, as activists and artists increasingly risk the threat of jail to publicly demand a ballot.

Thai Election Commission Chairman Ittiporn Boonpracong told a press conference Wednesday the date had been set for March 24.

“That is the date, which is flexible enough and should be beneficial to everyone concerned. That is the main reason why we decided to choose that date,” he said.

February date

Public frustration flared when it recently was announced the long promised vote would be delayed for a sixth time because of concerns the Feb. 24 scheduled date could conflict with King Maha Vajiralongkorn’s coronation in May.

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Activists and university students gather to demand the first election in Thailand, since the military seized power in a 2014 coup, in Bangkok, Jan. 8, 2019. VOA

That excuse had perplexed many, given that pushing the date back would bring it into even closer conflict with the coronation.

A group of arch royalists staged a demonstration directly outside the Election Commission to protest the pre-coronation ballot date immediately after it was announced Wednesday.

Wide field of parties

A particularly wide field of smaller parties now is set to contest the election in a political environment that has opened somewhat since the junta relaxed wide-ranging bans on political activities in December.

It will still be a democratic election, however, that comes with many autocratic caveats enshrined in the constitution Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha imposed after he seized power from Yingluck Shinawatra’s elected government in 2014.

Major concerns include the military being able to virtually hand pick the entire 250-person Senate. Future governments also will be locked into a legally binding 20-year junta-devised development plan covering everything from national security to social equality.

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Messages from activists demanding quick elections to end military rule is pictured at a university in Bangkok, Jan. 19, 2019. VOA

Military retains control

Paul Chambers, a political analyst and lecturer in Thailand’s Naresuan University, said the military also would retain significant control over its budgets after the election through a constitution that also allowed for an unelected prime minister.

“So, there is a democracy, there are elections, but when people say, ‘Oh, Thailand’s going back to democracy,’ it’s not the same quality of democracy that used to exist,” he said.

A very powerful military that could appoint people to positions in the army previously overseen by the elected prime minister would remain behind the scenes, Chambers emphasized.

In October, incoming Royal Thai Army commander Gen. Apirat Kongsompong refused to rule out yet another coup after the election.

Thailand has had 19 attempted coups and 12 successful ones since 1932.

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A Buddhist monk and a patient sweep the yard at Wat Thamkrabok monastery in Saraburi province, Thailand, Feb. 3, 2017.

Rival parties

In addition to the Pheu Thai party aligned with ousted Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra, and longtime rivals the Democrats, the pro-military Palang Pracharat Party will compete with several smaller parties.

One that has attracted considerable interest is the progressive and diverse team that has united behind 40-year-old billionaire Thanathorn Juangroongruangkit’s Future Forward.

Also Read: Calm Settles Over Congo After Election Result

On Tuesday, Thanathorn told VOA the election was just a small first step in what would be a protracted struggle to wrestle power from those who had controlled the wealth and power of the country for decades.

“So, if you want to correct what’s wrong over the past decade, there’s only one way you can solve that. You tackle the root cause of the problems. That means you have to deal with these structures, with this group of people. I haven’t seen any politicians trying to do this before,” he said.

“Since 1932, since the democratic revolution happened in Thailand — it’s been 86 years — and we’ve still been only this far. I believe democratization in this country will not be completed in the next year or two,” Thanathorn said. (VOA)