Wednesday January 23, 2019
Home Uncategorized Do you slip u...

Do you slip up when anxious? Here’s why

0
//
anxious

London: British neuroscientists have identified the brain network system that causes us to stumble and stall, which may have a disastrous effect on our performance.

Scientists at the University of Sussex’s Sackler Centre and Brighton and Sussex Medical School were able to pinpoint the brain area that causes the performance mishaps during an experiment using functional magnetic resonance neuroimaging (fMRI).

 

Previous study has shown that people tend to exert more force when they know they are being watched. For example, pianists unconsciously press keys harder when they play in front of an audience compared to when playing alone.

In the new study, participants’ brain activity was monitored while carrying out a task that required them to exert a precise amount of force when gripping an object.

During the experiment, they viewed video footage of two people whom they believed were evaluating their performance. They then repeated the task while viewing video footage of two people who appeared to be evaluating the performance of someone else.

Participants reported that they felt more anxious when they believed they were being observed. Under this condition, they gripped the object harder without realising it.

Scan results showed that an area of the brain that helps us to control our fine sensorimotor functions – the inferior parietal cortex (IPC) – became deactivated when people felt they were being observed.

In fact, this part of the brain works with another region – the posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) – to form what neuroscientists refer to as the action-observation network (AON). The AON is involved in “mentalisation” processes by which we infer what another person is thinking, based on his/her facial expressions and direction of gaze.

The pSTS conveys this information to the IPC, which then generates appropriate motor actions. If we feel our observer wants us to do well, we will perform well. But if we pick up negative cues, our IPC is deactivated and our performance falls apart.

The study results were published recently in the journal Scientific Reports. (IANS)

Next Story

Anxiety Linked to Kicking, Yelling During Sleep

Identifying lifestyle and personal risk factors linked to this sleep disorder may lead to finding ways to reduce the chances of developing it, the team noted

0
Probiotics Not Effective in Reducing Anxiety: Study
Anxiety linked to kicking, yelling during sleep: Study. Pixabay

Taking anti-depressants or having post-traumatic stress disorder or anxiety are risk factors for a disruptive and sometimes violent sleep disorder called rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behaviour disorder, says a study.

REM sleep is the dream state of sleep. A person may act out violent by yelling, flailing their arms, punching or kicking, to the point of harming themselves or a sleep partner.

During normal REM sleep, your brain sends signals to prevent your muscles from moving.

However, for people with REM sleep behavior disorder, those signals are disrupted.

“While much is still unknown about REM sleep behaviour disorder, it can be caused by medications or it may be an early sign of another neurologic condition like Parkinson’s disease, dementia with Lewy bodies or multiple system atrophy,” said study author Ronald Postuma at the McGill University in Canada.

For the study, the researchers looked at 30,097 people with an average age of 63.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

They identified 958 people, or 3.2 per cent with possible REM sleep behaviour disorder, after excluding participants with Parkinson’s disease, dementia, Alzheimer’s disease or sleep apnea.

In addition, findings, published in journal Neurology showed that 13 per cent of those with the disorder taking anti-depressants to treat depression compared to 6 per cent without the disorder.

People with the disorder were also two-and-a-half times as likely to have post-traumatic stress disorder and twice as likely to have mental illness, findings showed.

Other findings were that men were twice as likely as women to have possible REM sleep behaviour disorder.

Also Read- Women Having Slim Hips Could Be At Risk of Developing Diabetes, Heart Attacks

People with possible REM sleep behaviour disorder were 25 per cent more likely to be moderate to heavy drinkers than those without the disorder.

“Our hope is that our findings will help guide future research, especially because REM sleep behaviour disorder is such a strong sign of future neuro-degenerative disease,” said Postuma.

Identifying lifestyle and personal risk factors linked to this sleep disorder may lead to finding ways to reduce the chances of developing it, the team noted. (IANS)