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Donald Trump Holds off Calling Border Emergency

"We have a country that is being invaded by criminals and by drugs and we're going to stop it," Trump said, offering no evidence to back up his claims

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Caravans from Central America have inflamed the debate over U.S. immigration policy, with U.S. President Donald Trump using the migrants to try to secure backing for his plan to build a border wall on the frontier with Mexico., VOA

US President Donald Trump has halted his plan to declare a national emergency over immigration at the southern border, saying it was an “easy way out”, but he remained open to declaring it at a later time.

“It’s the easy way out,” CNN quoted the President as saying on Friday.

“Congress should do this. This is too simple. It’s too basic. And Congress should do this… If they can’t do it, I will declare a national emergency. I have the absolute right to do it,” Trump said.

One of the reasons Trump is reluctant to declare a national emergency is because he believes that his administration will be sued and that his actions will be blocked by the 9th Circuit.

“I’ll be sued. It’ll be brought to the 9th Circuit and maybe even though the wording is unambiguous… We’ll probably lose there, too,” Trump said, adding he would “hopefully win” at the Supreme Court.

Earlier in the week, White House lawyers began laying the groundwork for the legal defence of a national emergency declaration on the southern border, informed sources told CNN.

Donald Trump, president
Trump holds off calling border emergency. VOA

Earlier Friday, Trump continued to bolster his case about the need to build a wall.

“I just got back and it is a far worse situation than almost anyone would understand, an invasion!” Trump tweeted following his Thursday trip to the border town of McAllen in Texas.

“I have been there numerous times – The Democrats, Cryin’ Chuck (Schumer) and Nancy (Pelosi) don’t know how bad and dangerous it is for our entire country.

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“The Steel Barrier, or Wall, should have been built by previous administrations long ago. They never got it done – I will. Without it, our country cannot be safe. Criminals, gangs, human traffickers, drugs and so much other big trouble can easily pour in. It can be stopped cold!”
Later during his roundtable, Trump reiterated his belief that the country is “under siege.

“We have a country that is being invaded by criminals and by drugs and we’re going to stop it,” Trump said, offering no evidence to back up his claims. (IANS)

Next Story

White House Condemns Any Link of President Donald Trump to Accused New Zealand Shooter

Trump was widely attacked in the aftermath of a deadly white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, in 2017 when he equated white supremacists with counter-protesters, saying "both sides" were to blame and that there were "fine people" on both sides of the protest.

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In this Jan. 2, 2019, file photo White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney listens as President Donald Trump speaks during a Cabinet meeting at the White House in Washington. VOA

The White House on Sunday rejected any attempt to link President Donald Trump to the white supremacist accused of gunning down 50 people at two New Zealand mosques.

“The president is not a white supremacist,” acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney told the “Fox News Sunday” show. “I’m not sure how many times we have to say that. Let’s take what happened in New Zealand [Friday] for what it is: a terrible evil tragic act.”

Donald Trump
The statement renewed criticism that Trump has not voiced strong enough condemnation of white nationalists. VOA

Alleged gunman Brenton Harris Tarrant, a 28-year-old Australian, said in a 74-page manifesto he released shortly before the massacre unfolded at mosques in Christchurch that he viewed Trump as “a symbol of renewed white identity and common purpose” but did not support his policies.

The statement renewed criticism that Trump has not voiced strong enough condemnation of white nationalists.

Asked Friday after the mosque attacks whether he sees an increase in white nationalism, Trump said, “I don’t really. I think it’s a small group of people that have very, very serious problems, I guess.” He said he had not seen the manifesto.

Mulvaney said, “I don’t think it’s fair to cast this person as a supporter of Donald Trump any more than it is to look at his eco-terrorist passages in that manifesto and align him with [Democratic House Speaker] Nancy Pelosi or Ms. Ocasio-Cortez,” Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, a Democratic congresswoman.

“This was a disturbed individual, an evil person,” he said.

Donald Trump
“The president is not a white supremacist,” acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney told the “Fox News Sunday” show. “I’m not sure how many times we have to say that. Let’s take what happened in New Zealand [Friday] for what it is: a terrible evil tragic act.” VOA
Scott Brown, the U.S. ambassador to New Zealand, told CNN that he gave no credence to Tarrant’s comments about Trump in the manifesto, saying the accused gunman “is rotten to the core.” Brown said he hopes Tarrant is convicted “as quickly as he can be” and the key to his prison cell thrown away.

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Trump was widely attacked in the aftermath of a deadly white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, in 2017 when he equated white supremacists with counter-protesters, saying “both sides” were to blame and that there were “fine people” on both sides of the protest.

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, one of numerous Democrats seeking the party’s presidential nomination to oppose Trump in the 2020 election, said on Twitter after the New Zealand attack, “Time and time again, this president has embraced and emboldened white supremacists and instead of condemning racist terrorists, he covers for them. This isn’t normal or acceptable.” (VOA)