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Donald Trump to continue using Twitter with same gusto he has displayed to date because his tweets get “results”

In December Trump remarked on the social network that the United States should "strengthen and expand" its nuclear capacity until "the world comes to its senses regarding nukes"

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President-elect Donald Trump gives thumbs up after speaking to reporters at Mar-a-Lago, Palm Beach, Florida, Dec. 28, 2016. VOA

Jan 3, 2017: US President-elect Donald Trump will continue using Twitter with the same gusto he has displayed to date because his tweets get “results”, the mogul’s future Press Secretary, Sean Spicer, said on Sunday.

EFE news quoted Spicer as telling ABC that the President-elect did not need to have his comments filtered through the “mainstream media”. “You know, with all due respect, I think it freaks the mainstream media out that he has this following of over 45-plus million people that follow him on social media, that he can have a direct conversation. He doesn’t have to have it funnelled through the media,” Spicer said.

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Trump’s Twitter account, specifically, has more than 18 million followers.

The future Press Secretary’s remarks contrast with those of Trump himself in his first interview after winning the November 8 election, when he said that he would limit his use of Twitter and promised, instead of using it, to comport himself in a more prudent manner.

“I’m going to be very restrained, if I use it at all, I’m going to be very restrained. I find it tremendous. It’s a modern form of communication,” he said at the time.

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However, the real-estate magnate has not appeared to curtail his tweets and in December remarked on the social network that the United States should “strengthen and expand” its nuclear capacity until “the world comes to its senses regarding nukes”, a comment that drew much criticism because of fears that such a course of action would spark a nuclear arms race.

He also tweeted about the UN that “the United Nations has such great potential but right now it is just a club for people to get together, talk and have a good time. So sad!”

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His UN comment came after the Security Council on December 23 decided to demand that Israel stops establishing settlements on Palestinian territory, a decision the US allowed by refusing to veto it. (IANS)

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US to Expand and Speed Up Deportations of Migrants

Legal experts said it was a dramatic expansion of a program already used along the U.S.-Mexican border

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U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement officers detain a suspect as they conduct a targeted enforcement operation in Los Angeles, Feb. 7, 2017. VOA

The Trump administration said on Monday it will expand and speed up deportations of migrants who enter the United States illegally by stripping away court oversight, enabling officials to remove people in days rather than months or years.

Set to be published in the Federal Register on Tuesday, the rule will apply “expedited removal” to the majority of those who enter the United States illegally, unless they can prove they have been living in the country for at least two years.

Legal experts said it was a dramatic expansion of a program already used along the U.S.-Mexican border that cuts out review by an immigration judge, usually without access to an attorney.

Both are available in regular proceedings.

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The Trump administration said on Monday it will expand and speed up deportations of migrants who enter the United States illegally by stripping away court oversight. Pixabay

“The Trump administration is moving forward into converting ICE (Immigrations and Customs Enforcement) into a ‘show me your papers’ army,” said Vanita Gupta, the president of The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, on a call with reporters.

It was likely the policy would be blocked quickly by a court, several experts said. The American Civil Liberties Union, which has filed suit to block numerous Trump immigration policies in court, has vowed to sue.

President Donald Trump has struggled to stem an increase of mostly Central American families arriving at the U.S.-Mexico border, leading to overcrowded detention facilities and a political battle over a growing humanitarian crisis.

The government said increasing rapid deportations would free up detention space and ease strains on immigration courts, which face a backlog of more than 900,000 cases.

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Nearly 300,000 of the approximately 11 million immigrants in the United States illegally could be quickly deported under the new rule, according to the nonpartisan Migration Policy Institute.

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) said 37%, or 20,570, of those encountered by ICE in the year to September had been in the country less than two years.

People in rapid deportation proceedings are detained for 11.4 days on average, according to DHS. People in regular proceedings are held for 51.5 days and are released into the United States for the months or years it takes to resolve their cases.

Legal experts said the rule shreds basic due process and could create havoc beyond immigrant communities.

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Set to be published in the Federal Register on Tuesday, the rule will apply “expedited removal” to the majority of those who enter the United States illegally. Pixabay

“ICE has been detaining and deporting U.S. citizens for decades,” said Jackie Stevens, a political science professor at Northwestern University. That policy came at a great cost to U.S. taxpayers in terms of litigation and compensation, she added.

U.S. citizens account for about 1% percent of those detained by ICE and about 0.5% of those deported, according to Stevens’ research.

“Expedited removal orders are going to make this much worse,” she said.

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit in San Francisco in March ruled that those ordered deported in the sped-up process have a right to take their case to a judge.

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Previously, only those immigrants caught within 100 miles of the border who had been in the country two weeks or less could be ordered rapidly deported. The policy makes an exception for immigrants who can establish a “credible fear” of persecution in their home country. (VOA)