Wednesday June 19, 2019

Don’t make Holi an excuse to binge on unhealthy calories and accumulate Health risks!

Try some healthy snacks like roasted hare kabab, grilled paneer tikka, rawa idli, broccoli and lentil chaat, this holi!

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Holi, Wikimedia

New Delhi, March 9, 2017: Don’t make Holi an excuse to binge on unhealthy calories and accumulate health risks. Go for detox and ditch too much of sweets, says an expert.

Sonia Narang, Nutrition Expert, Oriflame India, shares some tips that can help you to eat right on this Holi.

* Eat right and combat overeating. Gujiya and papri among a dozen other dishes are a must, but you must maintain the calorie consumption. For instance, take a spoonful instead of a full serving.

* You can increase water intake and salads to curb your appetite. Drink at least eight glasses of water for keeping your body hydrated. Try to stay away from drinks such as thandai and other alcoholic beverages.

* Plan your meal in such a way that one special meal of the day should most likely be lunch, so that day activities and movements can burn the extra amount of calories. Try keeping your breakfast light and healthy while dinner should be as light as possible to manage the intake of calories.

* Don’t neglect your exercise routine, keep your body active and compensate for the extra calories that are consumed.

* Try some healthy snacks like roasted hare kabab, grilled paneer tikka, rawa idli, broccoli and lentil chaat.

* Make a smoothie of strawberries, raspberries, apple, grapes and fresh ripened tomatoes. Add a little water and serve chilled. (IANS)

Next Story

Australian National University Study Warns Link Between Fast Food and Dementia

Dementia is the leading cause of death in Australian women, while for men it is second only to heart disease

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junk food, fast food
A combination hamburger served in Pyongyang, North Korea, June 12, 2018. A new Australian study links fast food, like burgers, to dementia. VOA

Research from the Australian National University (ANU) is warning of a link between the extra calories in a fast-food burger and brain diseases, including dementia.

People are “eating away at their brain with a really bad fast-food diet and little to no exercise,” the lead author of the study said. The ANU study also reinforces the link between type 2 diabetes, which is often triggered by obesity, and the rapid deterioration of brain function.

Dementia is the leading cause of death in Australian women, while for men it is second only to heart disease.

junk food
The study revealed a significant correlation between AGEs and junk food consumption, said Roberto Berni Canani, Associate Professor at the University of Naples Federico II in Italy. Pixabay

A clear link

Researchers believe there is a clear link between the deterioration of the brain and an unhealthy diet as well as a lack of exercise. There is a warning that highly processed fast food that is cheap, widely available and loaded with calories, sugar and fat is leading to significant harm.

The study from the ANU says that the damage to the brain is almost certainly irreversible once a person reaches middle age. Professor Nicolas Cherbuin says lifestyle choices really do matter.

“Poorer diet leads to the development of obesity,” he said. “It is compounded by the lack of physical activity, it leads to an increased level of inflammation in our body, which when it is [in] response to trauma is a good thing. But when it is constantly there it creates damage. It also kills neurons, so it affects our brain function and it leads to ultimately a greater risk of developing dementia later in life.”

junk food
Junk Food. Wikimedia Commons

ALSO READ: High Consumption of Junk Food May Spike up Allergies in Children

A third of adults overweight, obese

The research says that about a third of the world’s adult population is either overweight or obese. The advice is to eat well and exercise from a young age. It is estimated that dementia affects almost 50 million people worldwide, and the global cost of the brain syndromes, including Alzheimer’s disease, is more than $800 billion.

At present there is no prevention or cure for most forms of dementia. However, some medication has been found to reduce some symptoms. (VOA)