Friday December 14, 2018
Home Uncategorized Doordarshan t...

Doordarshan to bring Sanskrit back to life, to start a weekly 30 minutes programme

0
//
Republish
Reprint

download (1)

By NewsGram Staff Writer

With English becoming the global language, Sanskrit, the mother of all languages, has been gradually fading away from the mainstream.

Doordarshan, however, is spearheading the move to preserve the language as our cultural heritage. It plans on taking steps to popularize Sanskrit among the masses. Starting July onward, the national broadcaster will present a weekly ‘Sanskrit News Magazine,’ aiming to present events from every corner of the world.

The much awaited programme will be divided into news, features and debates and will be conducted entirely in Sanskrit. As of now, the DD officials are studying trends and patterns regarding the use of Sanskrit across the country in preparation of the magazine.

Speaking on the upcoming project, Akshay Rout, Additional Director General (News), Doordarshan told a newspaper, “We are putting in the best efforts to get reporters, editors and anchors fluent in Sanskrit, on contractual basis. The half-an-hour program will be telecasted on weekends. We will finalize the name in the next few days.”The project comes in the backdrop of the success of a special half hour bulletin in August 2014 during the Sanskrit Week 2014.

Every morning, at precisely 6.55 A.M., ‘Varta,’ (also spelled as Vaarta) a news bulletin in Sanskrit has been broadcasted by DD for the last many years. Plans are underway to extend the duration of the program by at least ten minutes.

“We are examining the feasibility of the existing bulletins. Right now, it is a five-minute bulletin, which I think is too short. It is neither here nor there. We may extend the time once we have the necessary staff,” told A Surya Prakash, Chairman Prasar Bharati to The Economic Times.

“The Sanskrit program will look at showcasing not just current affairs but also stories of interest from around the world, and more features will be added, depending on the interest it generates,” said a DD official.

The first Sanskrit bulletin on All India Radio (AIR) was broadcast in 1974, almost four decades after the national radio service started in 1936.

Remarkably, Sanskrit was the last language to be taken up by AIR’s news service division, much later than even Sindhi and Nepali.

‘Good News India,’ a weekly program, which showcases the transformation of the lives of people in the country, is also expected to be broadcasted soon, according to DD officials.

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2015 NewsGram

Next Story

Californian Couple Develops A Way That Allows To Make Water From Air

Doss-Hertz prepared to leave for a photo shoot and a visitor sampled a glass of their freshly made water.

0
water, girls
The Skysource/Skywater Alliance co-founders David Hertz, right, and his wife Laura Doss-Hertz demonstrate how the Skywater 300 turns air into water, in Los Angeles. VOA

It started out modestly enough: David Hertz, having learned that under the right conditions you really can make your own water out of thin air, put a little contraption on the roof of his California office and began cranking out free bottles of H2O for anyone who wanted one.

Soon he and his wife, Laura Doss-Hertz, were thinking bigger — so much so that this week the couple won the $1.5 million XPrize For Water Abundance. They prevailed by developing a system that uses shipping containers, wood chips and other detritus to produce as much as 528 gallons (2,000 liters) of water a day at a cost of no more than 2 cents a quart (1 liter).

The XPrize competition, created by a group of philanthropists, entrepreneurs and others, has awarded more than $140 million over the years for what it calls audacious, futuristic ideas aimed at protecting and improving the planet. The first XPrize, for $10 million, went to Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen and aviation pioneer Burt Rutan in 2004 for SpaceShipOne, the first privately financed manned space flight.

When Hertz learned a couple of years ago that a prize was about to be offered to whoever could come up with a cheap, innovative way to produce clean freshwater for a world that doesn’t have enough of it, he decided to go all in.

Ebola, UNICEF. congo, DNA, water
A boy runs past a dispenser containing water mixed with disinfectant, east of Mbandaka, DRC. VOA

At the time, his little water-making machine was cranking out 150 gallons a day, much of which was being given to homeless people living in and around the alley behind the Studio of Environmental Architecture, Hertz’s Venice Beach-area firm that specializes in creating green buildings.

He and his wife, a commercial photographer, and their partner Richard Groden, who created the smaller machine, assembled The Skysource/Skywater Alliance and went to work. They settled on creating little rainstorms inside shipping containers by heating up wood chips to produce the temperature and humidity needed to draw water from the air and the wood itself.

“One of the fascinating things about shipping containers is that more are imported than exported, so there’s generally a surplus,” said Hertz, adding they’re cheap and easy to move around.

And if there’s no wood chips around for heat, coconut husks, rice, walnut shells, grass clippings or just about any other such waste product will do just fine.

“Certainly in regions where you have a lot of biomass, this is going to be a very simple technology to deploy,” said Matthew Stuber, a professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering at the University of Connecticut and expert on water systems who was one of the panel’s judges.

Water
The XPrize trophy is seen at The Skysource/Skywater Alliance offices in Los Angeles, Oct. 24, 2018. VOA

He called their water-making machine a “really cool” merging of rather simple technologies that can be used to quickly deliver water to regions hit by natural disasters or stricken by drought, or even rural areas with a shortage of clean water.

Hertz and Doss-Hertz are just starting to contemplate how to accomplish that.

Theirs was among 98 teams from 27 countries who entered the competition. Many teams were bigger and better funded, while the couple mortgaged their Malibu home to stay in the game. At one point, they were told they hadn’t made the final round of five, but one team dropped out and they were back in.

“If you say we were the dark horse in the race, we weren’t even in the race,” Hertz recalled, smiling.

Also Read: Dusshera In Delhi Casts A Dark Blanket, Air Quality Worsens

He stood near a giant copy of the check in his office while Doss-Hertz prepared to leave for a photo shoot and a visitor sampled a glass of their freshly made water.

Now, though, they are in for the long, wet haul.

“There’s no restrictions whatsoever on how it’s used,” Hertz said of the prize money. “But Laura and I have committed to using it all for the development and deployment of these machines, to get them to people who need the water most. (VOA)