Wednesday December 11, 2019

Drinking Coffee Improves Bowel Movement, Find Researchers

Decaffeinated coffee had a similar effect on the microbiome

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Starbucks coffee
Starbucks coffee. Pixabay

Drinking coffee keeps the bowels moving because it changes gut bacteria and improves ability of intestines to contract, find researchers.

Researchers, feeding rats coffee and also mixing it with gut bacteria in petri dishes, found that coffee suppressed bacteria and increased muscle motility, regardless of caffeine content.

“When rats were treated with coffee for three days, the ability of the muscles in the small intestine to contract appeared to increase,” said Xuan-Zheng Shi, associate professor in internal medicine at the University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston.

Interestingly, these effects are caffeine-independent, because caffeine-free coffee had similar effects as regular coffee, Shi informed during the Digestive Disease Week (DDW) 2019 here on Sunday.

Coffee has long been known to increase bowel movement, but researchers have not pinpointed the specific reason or mechanism.

A barista pours steamed milk into a cup of coffee at a cafe in Los Angeles, Sept. 22, 2017. State health officials proposed a regulation change Friday that would declare coffee doesn't present a significant cancer risk, countering a California court ruling.
A barista pours steamed milk into a cup of coffee at a cafe in Los Angeles, Sept. 22, 2017. VOA

The study found that growth of bacteria and other microbes in fecal matter in a petri dish was suppressed with a solution of 1.5 per cent coffee, and growth of microbes was even lower with a 3 per cent solution of coffee.

Decaffeinated coffee had a similar effect on the microbiome.

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Muscles in the lower intestines and colons of the rats showed increased ability to contract after a period of coffee ingestion, and coffee stimulated contractions of the small intestine and colon when muscle tissues were exposed to coffee directly in the lab.

The results support the need for additional clinical research to determine whether coffee drinking might be an effective treatment for post-operative constipation, or ileus, in which the intestines quit working after abdominal surgery, the authors noted. (IANS)

Next Story

Consumption of Coffee May Reduce MetS: Study

Drinking coffee may reduce heart disease risk

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Coffee-reduce MetS
Coffee has been proven to reduce MetS. Pixabay

Coffee consumption is associated with reduced risk of metabolic syndrome (Mets), say researchers adding that MetS increases the risk of cardiovascular problems, including coronary heart disease and stroke.

According the study, Assistant Professor Giuseppe Grosso from the University of Catania, Italy, reviewed his own scientific research on the association between coffee consumption and MetS in Polish and Italian cohorts and explored the potential mechanistic perspectives behind the inverse association.

His research suggests that polyphenols contained in coffee may be involved in the inverse association, specifically phenolic acids and flavonoids.

He also reviewed research that suggests that moderate coffee consumption is associated with a reduction of CVD, cancer, all-cause mortality and type 2 diabetes.

For the findings, Associate Professor Estefania from Toledo University of Navarra, Spain, reviewed meta-analyses considering associations between coffee consumption and MetS and discussed work in a Mediterranean cohort.

Her research involved 22,000 people and specifically considered caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee.

Reducing MetS- coffee
Average consumption of coffee can reduce the risk of heart diseases by reducing MetS. Pixabay

The study concluded that moderate coffee consumption (one to four cups per day) was associated with reduced risk of MetS, whilst higher intakes were not.

This was reported for both regular and decaffeinated coffee.

The inverse association between coffee consumption and metabolic syndrome was shown in both men and women, said the study.

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Meta-analyses also found that a moderate consumption of both caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee may be associated with a reduced risk of metabolic syndrome.

The study was presented at the 13th European Nutrition Conference organised by the Federation of European Nutrition Societies (FENS) in Dublin, Ireland. (IANS)