Friday June 21, 2019

Drinking just one or two alcoholic drinks per day may cause liver disease

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Whiskey

By NewsGram Staff Writer

This goes out to all the party buffs who think that sipping a glass or two of alcoholic drinks a day will not cause any harm.

A recent study presented at The International Liver Congress 2015 in Vienna, Austria unveiled that cirrhosis burden caused by alcohol went up by 11.13% when moving from the moderate to heavy daily drinking (one drink for women and two drinks for men).

The researchers drew attention to the fact that indulging in daily consumption of alcohol turns out to be the strongest forecaster of alcoholic cirrhosis.

The World Health Organization’s (WHO) Global Status Report on Alcohol and Health shows that around 6% of global deaths are caused by drinking alcohol, the majority of which is from alcoholic cirrhosis.

The researchers examined the WHO’s Global Status Report on Alcohol and Health. The report incorporated parameters of alcohol consumption and drinking patterns from 193 countries.

“The presence of heavy daily drinkers in a population most significantly and independently influences the weight of alcohol in a country’s cirrhosis burden,” said Eva Stein, one of the researchers.

 

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Alcohol Consumption Increased 38% in India: Lancet Study

The study measured per capita alcohol consumption using data for 189 countries between 1990-2017 from the WHO and the Global Burden of Disease study

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A photo made with a fisheye lens shows bottles of alcohol in a liquor store in Salt Lake City. The National Institutes of Health said Friday that it was canceling a study of moderate drinking's health benefits because the results could not be trusted. Beer and liquor companies were helping to underwrite it.
This June 16, 2016, file photo, taken with a fisheye lens, shows bottles of alcohol during a tour of a state liquor store, in Salt Lake City. Cheap liquor, wine and beer have long been best-sellers among Utah alcohol drinkers, but new numbers from Utah's tightly-controlled liquor system show local craft brews, trendy box wines and flavored whiskies are also popular choices in a largely teetotaler state. VOA

Alcohol consumption in India increased from 4.3 litres a year per adult to 5.9 litres in 2017, a growth of 38 per cent, says a study of 189 countries’ alcohol intake.

Driven by the rise in alcohol intake in India, China and Vietnam, global alcohol consumption increased from 5.9 litres a year per adult in 1990, to 6.5 litres in 2017, and is predicted to increase further to 7.6 litres by 2030, showed the results published in The Lancet.

As a result of increased alcohol consumption and population growth, the total volume of alcohol consumed globally per year has increased by 70 per cent — from 20,999 million litres in 1990 to 35,676 million litres in 2017.

While intake is growing in low and middle-income countries, the total volume of alcohol consumed in high-income countries has remained stable, the study said.

The estimates suggest that by 2030 half of all adults will drink alcohol, and almost a quarter (23 per cent) will binge drink at least once a month.

“Our study provides a comprehensive overview of the changing landscape in global alcohol exposure. Before 1990, most alcohol was consumed in high-income countries, with the highest use levels recorded in Europe,” said study author Jakob Manthey from Technische Universitat Dresden in Germany.

Alcohol, drink
Middle-aged adults must have ‘drink-free’ days for healthy body. Pixabay

“However, this pattern has changed substantially, with large reductions across Eastern Europe and vast increases in several middle-income countries such as China, India and Vietnam,” Manthey added.

“This trend is forecast to continue up to 2030 when Europe is no longer predicted to have the highest level of alcohol use,” he added.

Increasing rates of alcohol use suggest that the world is not on track to achieve targets against harmful alcohol use.

Also Read- Here’s How Coca-Cola Retains Power to Kill some Health Research

“Based on our data, the WHO’s aim of reducing the harmful use of alcohol by 10 per cent by 2025 will not be reached globally,” Manthey said.

“Instead, alcohol use will remain one of the leading risk factors for the burden of disease for the foreseeable future, and its impact will probably increase relative to other risk factors,” he warned, adding that implementation of effective alcohol policies is warranted, especially in rapidly developing countries with growing rates of alcohol use.

The study measured per capita alcohol consumption using data for 189 countries between 1990-2017 from the WHO and the Global Burden of Disease study. (IANS)