Saturday October 19, 2019

Drinking just one or two alcoholic drinks per day may cause liver disease

0
//

Whiskey

By NewsGram Staff Writer

This goes out to all the party buffs who think that sipping a glass or two of alcoholic drinks a day will not cause any harm.

A recent study presented at The International Liver Congress 2015 in Vienna, Austria unveiled that cirrhosis burden caused by alcohol went up by 11.13% when moving from the moderate to heavy daily drinking (one drink for women and two drinks for men).

The researchers drew attention to the fact that indulging in daily consumption of alcohol turns out to be the strongest forecaster of alcoholic cirrhosis.

The World Health Organization’s (WHO) Global Status Report on Alcohol and Health shows that around 6% of global deaths are caused by drinking alcohol, the majority of which is from alcoholic cirrhosis.

The researchers examined the WHO’s Global Status Report on Alcohol and Health. The report incorporated parameters of alcohol consumption and drinking patterns from 193 countries.

“The presence of heavy daily drinkers in a population most significantly and independently influences the weight of alcohol in a country’s cirrhosis burden,” said Eva Stein, one of the researchers.

 

Next Story

Weight Gain in Mid-20s is Linked to Early Death, Study Says

According to the study published in the BMJ journal, weight loss at older ages (from middle to late adulthood) was also linked to higher risk

0
Weight
Weight loss at older ages , Apart from Weight gain (from middle to late adulthood) is also linked to higher risk. Pixabay

Weight Gain from your mid-20s into middle age is associated with an increased risk of premature death, warn researchers.

According to the study published in the BMJ journal, weight loss at older ages (from middle to late adulthood) was also linked to higher risk.

“The results highlight the importance of maintaining normal weight across adulthood, especially preventing weight gain in early adulthood, for preventing premature deaths in later life,” said study researchers from China.

For the study, researchers based in China set out to investigate the association between weight changes across adulthood and mortality.

Their findings were based on data from the 1988-94 and 1999-2014 US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), a nationally representative annual survey that includes interviews, physical examinations and blood samples, to gauge the health of the US citizens.

Their analysis included 36,051 people aged 40 years or over with measured body weight and height at the start of the survey (baseline) and recalled weight at young adulthood (25 years old) and middle adulthood (average age 47 years).

Deaths from any cause and specifically from heart diseases were recorded for an average of 12 years, during which time there were 10,500 deaths.

Weight
Weight Gain from young to middle adulthood was associated with increased risk of mortality, compared with participants who remained at normal weight. Pixabay

After taking account of potentially influential factors, the researchers found that people who remained obese throughout adult life had the highest risk of mortality, while people who remained overweight throughout adult life had a very modest or no association with mortality.

Weight gain from young to middle adulthood was associated with increased risk of mortality, compared with participants who remained at normal weight.

Weight loss over this period was not significantly related to mortality.

ALSO READ: Workout Before Breakfast To Get Fit, Says Study

But as people got older, the association between weight gain and mortality weakened, whereas the association with weight loss from middle to late adulthood became stronger and significant. (IANS)