Tuesday December 11, 2018

Drug-Free Compound can Ease Arthritis Pain

It has been found that rose-hip has the power to reduce the agony of osteoarthritis sufferers

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Drug-Free Compound can Ease Arthritis Pain
Drug-Free Compound can Ease Arthritis Pain. Pixabay
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People suffering from arthritis can reduce pain by 90 percent with a drug-free compound derived from rose-hip, the fruit of the rose plant, new research indicates.

It has been found that rose-hip has the power to reduce the agony of osteoarthritis sufferers.

Human trials suggest a compound called GOPO, found in the rosa canina species of rose-hip, could provide a breakthrough for six million people whose lives are blighted by joint pain.

Rose hip
Rose hip. Pixabay

Danish researchers found the specially cultivated compound reduced nagging joint pain in the hands of nine out of 10 of the trial participants when it was taken in supplement form, reports femalefirst.co.uk.

Debilitating stiffness in finger and thumb joints can make tasks like opening jars, holding cutlery and tying shoelaces nearly impossible.

Also Read: How Chikungunya Virus Causes Arthritis Pain Decoded

The results of investigations carried out at Frederiksberg University in Copenhagen and published in the Open Journal of Rheumatology and Autoimmune Disease, demonstrate that the extract could offer natural pain relief, showing that sufferers were a third less likely to use conventional painkillers after taking the supplement. (Bollywood Country)

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Obesity And Smoking: Roadblocks In Arthritis Treatment

Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease

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Obesity And Smoking Becomes Roadblocks In Arthritis Treatment
Obesity And Smoking Becomes Roadblocks In Arthritis Treatment, Pixabay

Obesity in women and smoking among men could be major factors behind not achieving remission in rheumatoid arthritis, despite early treatment, researchers say.

Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease that affects a person’s joints, causing pain and disability and can also affect internal organs.

The study showed that though early identification and aggressive treatment improve arthritis outcomes, six per cent of women and 38 per cent of men did not achieve remission in the first year despite receiving guideline-based care.

“Our results suggest that lifestyle changes — smoking cessation in men and weight reduction in women — as well as optimising methotrexate use may facilitate rapid reduction of inflammation, an essential goal of treatment in early rheumatoid arthritis,” said Susan Bartlett, professor of Medicine at McGill University in Canada.

The study, published in the journal Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, included 1,628 adults with an average age of 55.

The analysis highlighted that obesity more than doubled the likelihood of not achieving remission in women.

obesity
obesity, Pixabay

In men, current smoking was associated with 3.5 greater odds of not achieving remission within the first year.

Further, almost all patients within the study were initially treated with conventional synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (csDMARDs), with three quarters being treated with methotrexate.

Analysis demonstrated that not using methotrexate significantly increased the likelihood of not achieving remission in women by 28 per cent and in men by 45 per cent.

Also read: drug free compound can ease arthritis pain

“These results highlight the need to support physicians and empower patients to take advantage of the impact lifestyle changes can have on disease progression,” Johannes Bijlsma, President, European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR), said in a statement. (IANS)