Thursday September 19, 2019
Home Science & Technology E-mail much b...

E-mail much better than message in expressing your love: Study

0
//

By NewsGram Staff Writer

Weather already in love or looking to propose your loved one; a study suggests a better way of expressing your feeling to the one you love. According to a recent research at Indiana University, an email can be more effective than a text, voice or WhatsApp message if you want to express your romantic feelings.

Following the psycho-physiological measure taken from 72 college going people, email is more effective in conveying any information  to closed ones as its compels them to think about.

email-heart“The bottom line is that email is much better when you want to convey some information that you want someone to think about,” said Alan R Dennis, from IU’s Kelley School of Business.

Dennis and co-author Taylor M. Wells found that people who sent romantic e-mails were more emotionally aroused and also used stronger and more thoughtful language than those who left voicemails.

Dennis and Wells said, “when writing romantic emails, senders consciously or subconsciously added more positive content to their messages, perhaps to compensate for the medium’s inability to convey vocal tone.”

Email enables senders to modify the content as messages are composed to ensure they are crafted to the needs of the situation. But voicemails are devoid of such a feature. As the sender records a voicemail in a single take, and it can be sent or discarded and re-recorded, but not edited.

“Thus, senders engage with email messages longer and may think about the task more deeply than when leaving voicemails. This extra processing may increase arousal,” the authors noted.

A previous research had suggested that e-mail and text chat are considered poor for communicating emotion.

The study also demonstrates that the medium used can shape the content of the message. Senders of utilitarian messages sent less positive emails than voicemails for the same communication task.

However, when composing romantic messages, senders included the most positive and most arousing emotional content in emails and the least positive and least arousing emotional content in voicemails.

These findings, however, do not suggest that face-to-face meetings, personal phone calls and other direct forms of communications aren’t as useful.

The research has been accepted for publication in the journal Computers in Human Behaviour.

With inputs from IANS

Next Story

A New Method To Track Rats, Researchers Suggest

Researchers have found that rats can be baited to or repelled from locations using pheromones found in the scents of other rats

0
A rat caught in a rat trap. Wikimedia Commons

Researchers have found that rats can be baited to or repelled from locations using pheromones found in the scents of other rats.

Rats cost the world’s economy more than $300 billion a year. In addition to causing fines and business closures, rats spread disease, start fires and disable motor vehicles.

For the study published in The Journal of Urban Ecology, over a one year period researchers trapped and implanted microchips in city rats in a waste recycling centre in Brooklyn, New York.

“If we can pinpoint the scents and contexts that are most useful, then we increase our chances of creating novel control tools, but further research is needed under a broad range of conditions,” said study researchers from Fordham University, Columbia University and Arrow Exterminators Inc.

To overcome issues in using GPS to track movement in dense urban environments, they utilised radio-frequency identification sensors.

Rats, Tracking, Research, Disease
Rats cost the world’s economy more than $300 billion a year. In addition to causing fines and business closures, rats spread disease, start fires and disable motor vehicles. Wikimedia Commons

Male and female scents were then placed on, or near, these sensors and replaced every two weeks.

To determine whether risk impacted the findings, the research team positioned these devices in sheltered, safe areas that rats were familiar with and also in more risky, open environments where rats were vulnerable to predation.

According to the study, rats reacted differently to male and female scents.

In general, when rats responded to sensors with male scents, risk was unimportant. Rats briefly visited male scents equally in exposed and sheltered areas, and then stayed away.

ALSO READ: Lack of Sleep Alters Fat Metabolism, Says Study

Female scents, however, were visited significantly more often than male scents (0.2 visits/day compared to 5.02 visits/day).

This implies that attractants may be more useful near sheltered areas while deterrent scents may be more useful in exposed areas where animals are vulnerable to predators.

These findings address a knowledge gap about rat scent preference that could assist in urban wildlife management tools, such as the deployment of baits or immuno-contraceptives. (IANS)