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e-Visa in return of stapled Visa – Is this Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s diplomacy?

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By Harshmeet Singh

Before Narendra Modi left for China, his list of agendas included discussion about stapled visas issued to the citizens of Arunachal Pradesh and Jammu & Kashmir by China. So when the Prime Minister overlooked it and extended the facility of e-visa to the Chinese tourists, it drew sharp criticism from many corners.

As expected, the Congress party latched on to this opportunity to criticize the PM and accused him of going too far ahead in the name of diplomacy. “Diplomacy is all about quid pro quo and reciprocity”,Congress spokesperson RPN Singh told PTI. Interestingly, just a few hours before the announcement, S Jaishankar, India’s foreign secretary had said “no decision has been taken yet” on the issue of extending the e-visas to Chinese tourists. While the sequence of events highlight that the decision was taken in haste, it would be worth analyzing the pros and cons of this spontaneous decision by the Prime Minister before arriving at a conclusion.

There are said to be contrasting views about the decision among the ministries. While the Home Ministry put forward its concerns regarding the misuse of such facility, these concerns were overridden by the Tourism Ministry’s support to the proposal.

All this for tourism?

According to the numbers furnished by the World Travel & Tourism Council, 6.6% of India’s GDP in 2012 was generated through tourism related activities. Modi Government’s push towards increasing tourism revenues in the country has been evident ever since it assumed office. According to the new Visa policy, citizens from close to 180 countries would be offered the facility of e-Visa in several phases.

According to the Indian Tourism Statistics 2013, published by the Ministry of Tourism, Chinese tourists accounted for a meager 2.51% of the total foreign tourists visiting India in 2013. At the same time, Indian tourists made up over 5.5% foreign tourists in China. Looks like our deficit with China goes much beyond trade!

Since the Government started offering e-visa facility from November last year, as per the Government’s assumptions, this should have increased the tourist inflow in the country, and made the rupee much stronger. On the contrary, rupee came down to a 4 month low level by the end of April. This is a clear indication of things happening contrary to the Government’s assumptions. May be it is time for the Government to understand that attracting tourists would take much more than extending the e-visa facility.

Would it give us FDI?

Some other experts also say that this move may help in the inflow of FDI into the country, which in turn, would boost the country’s infrastructure. But it would be immature to assume that a mere e-visa facility would open the floodgates for the flow of FDI into the country. Unless the Government gets rid of the red tape in the country and prepares an attractive ground for the investors, such facilities would hardly make any difference on the ground.

All diplomacy and no security?

The national security agencies were also opposed to the Government’s decision to offer such a facility. A Government official was later quoted saying, “The government has overruled the Intelligence Bureau and R&AW. So you can imagine the position of the government. We don’t want to bog down the intelligence agencies. The government has decided to bring their relationship with the most important country to a certain level, we have to take it forward,”

Such decisions which overlook feedback from all the concerned authorities and lack consensus are reminiscent of a Monarchy where one ruler has the final say irrespective of others’ voices.

Did India really have to offer this to China?

India and China have always been in an awkward relationship. Since the time of Jawaharlal Nehru, several Governments have tried to read the mind of the dragon, but failed. In September last year, while Xi Jinping and Modi were on a swing at Sabarmati River Front, supposedly writing a new chapter in Indo-Sino ties, China’s troops were intruding into the Ladakh region.

Just a day before Modi’s gracious e-visa offer to the Chinese tourists, China’s national television broadcaster showed an Indian map sans the areas of Arunachal Pradesh and Jammu & Kashmir. While this brought some strong reactions on the Social Media, there wasn’t any ‘official’ complaint from the Indian Government. The channel wasn’t asked to offer any apology either. This reaction is in stark contrast to a similar case in Australia last year before the G20 summit. The Queensland University in Brisbane, in Modi’s presence, showed an incorrect Indian map, with Jammu & Kashmir missing from top. At that time, India had registered a ‘strong official protest’ and demanded an apology from the officials. On the contrary, this time around, Modi went ahead and offered a freebie to China the very next day. It seems like all those strong words about protecting India’s sovereignty have been overlooked just for getting some tourists into the country.

Last month, China called Arunachal Pradesh issue a ‘Huge dispute’ and formally opposed Modi’s visit to the state. All this was done when Modi was supposed to visit Beijing in a month’s time. If the PM wants to go around the real issues and offer freebies in a hope that it will soften China’s stand on various disputes, he would be well advised to refer to the history of Indo-Chinese relations and learn the lesson!

 

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India China’s Fight Over the Doklam Plateau Explained

Doklam or Donglang, is a disputed area between China and Bhutan located near their tri-junction with India

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picture from- indiaopines.com

By Ruchika Verma

  • India and China have an old history of disputes
  • This time, the dispute is regarding the Dokplam Plateau
  • The area is of strategic importance for both the nations

Disputes between India and China are not at all uncommon. The rivalry between the two nations is famous. There have been several disputes between the two on the India-China border in past, and there seems to be no stopping for these disputes in the present or future, for that matter.

India and China have a n old history of repeated disputes. zeenews.india.com
India and China have an old history of repeated disputes. zeenews.india.com

In June 2017, the world witnessed yet another dispute arising between India and China. This time the dispute was about China building a road extending to Doklam Plateau, which both nations have been fighting over for years now.

Also Read: China is likely to get involved if India disrupts $46 billion China-Pakistan Economic Corridor

History of the dispute 

Doklam or Donglang (in Chinese), is a disputed area between China and Bhutan located near their tri-junction with India. India doesn’t directly claim the area but supports Bhutan’s claims on it.

India fits into the picture, as this plateau is an important area for India. Not only is Bhutan one of the biggest allies of India; China gaining access over the Doklam Plateau will also endanger India’s borders, making them vulnerable to attacks.

Dopkam plateau is an important area near India, China and Bhutan's borders.
Dopkam plateau is an important area near India, China and Bhutan’s borders.

Apart from the hostile history of the two nations, the Doklam Plateau is also important for India to maintain its control over a land corridor that connects to its remote northeastern States. China building a road through Doklam surely threatens that control.

A complete timeline of what happened in the recent Doklam Standoff 

On 16 June 2017, Chinese troops with construction vehicles and excavators began extending an existing road southward on the Doklam plateau, near India’s border. It was Bhutan which raised the alarm for India.

On 18 June 2017, India responded by sending around 270 Indian troops, with weapons and two bulldozers to evict the Chinese troops from Doklam.

On 29 June 2017, Bhutan protested against the construction of a road in the disputed territory.  According to the Bhutanese government, China attempted to extend a road in an area which is shared both Bhutan and India, along with China.

Between 30 June 2017 and 5 July 2017, China released multiple statements justifying their claim over the Doklam plateau. They cited reasons as to why the Doklam standoff wasn’t really needed. And how China has not intruded into India’s territory to incite the standoff.

On 19th July 2017, China asked India again to withdraw its troops from the Doklam. On 24th July 2017,  Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi, in his statement, asked India to withdraw and behave themselves to maintain peace.

India and China seem to never agree when it comes to their borders. BBC
India and China seem to never agree when it comes to their borders. BBC

Also Read: Why India Must Counter China’s High-Altitude Land Grab?

What followed till 16th August 2017 was China constantly alleging India of trying to create trouble. They accused India of trying to disturb the peace and not withdrawing the troops, even after repeated reminders. They also accused India of bullying.

India, however, kept quiet during the whole fiasco, only releasing a statement regarding their stand and position at the Doklam standoff.

On 28 August 2017, India and China finally announced that they had agreed to pull their troops back from the Doklam standoff. The withdrawal was completed on that very day.

On 7 September 2017, many media reports claimed that both nation’s troops have not left the site completely. They were still patrolling the area, simply having moved 150 meters away from their previous position.

On 9 October 2017, China announced that it is ready to maintain peace with India at the frontiers. India reacted in affirmative, the peace was established when Indian Defence Minister, Nirmala Sitharaman’s visited Nathu La.

The issue between the two nations may rise again. Pixabay
The issue between the two nations may rise again. Pixabay

The Doklam issue, for now, is resolved. However, given the history of disputes between India and China, it won’t be a surprise if the issue resurfaces again in near future.