Monday December 10, 2018

Eating Chocolate May Guard Against Diabetes

Having a significant amount of berries, tea and chocolate daily may help protect you from diabetes

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Eating Chocolate May Guard Against Diabetes
Eating Chocolate May Guard Against Diabetes. Pixabay
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Having a significant amount of berries, tea and chocolate daily may help protect you from diabetes.

According to researchers from University of East Anglia (UEA) and King’s College London in Britain, high levels of flavonoids including anthocyanins and other compounds in berries, tea and chocolate could guard against type 2 diabetes.

High intakes of these dietary compounds are associated with lower insulin resistance and better blood glucose regulation, said the study published in the Journal of Nutrition.
Researchers studied nearly 2,000 healthy women volunteers.

They found that those who consumed plenty of anthocyanins and flavones had lower insulin resistance.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

“High insulin resistance is associated with type 2 diabetes, so what we are seeing is that people who eat foods rich in these two compounds – such as berries, herbs, red grapes, wine – are less likely to develop the disease,” said Aedin Cassidy from UEA’s Norwich Medical School.

Those who had anthocyanins in great quantity were least likely to suffer chronic inflammation – which is associated with many of today’s most pressing health concerns including diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular disease and cancer, she added.

Also Read: Avoid Diabetes With Yoga, Weight Lifting

“Those who consumed the most flavone compounds had improved levels of a protein (adiponectin) which helps regulate a number of metabolic processes including glucose levels,” said Cassidy.

What we do not yet know is exactly how much of these compounds are necessary to potentially reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes, she added. (IANS)

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New Drug Offers Treatment For Diabetes-Related Blindness

The researchers now plan to conduct a full-scale clinical trial, Gamble said

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new policy will see the launch of 12 programmes relevant to private schools across the emirate
New drug offers hope for diabetes-related blindness.

In a major breakthrough, Australian scientists have developed a new drug that offers treatment for people suffering from diabetic retinopathy — the main cause of blindness from diabetes.

The debilitating disease occurs when tiny blood vessels in the retina, responsible for detecting light, leak fluid or haemorrhage.

While treatment options include laser surgery or eye injections of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), they are not always effective or can result in side effects, highlighting the need for alternative therapeutic approaches.

The team from the Centenary Institute in Sydney developed a novel drug CD5-2, which in mouse models was found to mend the damaged blood retinal barrier and reduce vascular leakage.

“We believe CD5-2 could potentially be used as a stand-alone therapy to treat those patients who fail to respond to the anti-VEGF treatment. It may also work in conjunction with existing anti-VEGF treatments to extend the effectiveness of the treatment,” said lead author Ka Ka Ting from the Institute.

“With limited treatment options currently available, it is critical we develop alternative strategies for the treatment of this outcome of diabetes,” Ting added.

Diabetes
Representational image. Pixabay

The key process involved in diabetic retinopathy pathology is the breakdown of the blood-retinal barrier (BRB), which is normally impermeable. Its integrity relies on how well capillary endothelial cells are bound together by tight junctions. If the junctions are loose or damaged, the blood vessels can leak.

In the study, reported in the journal Diabetologia, CD5-2 was found to have therapeutic potential for individuals with vascular-leak-associated retinal diseases based on its ease of delivery and its ability to reverse vascular dysfunction as well as inflammatory aspects in animal models of retinopathy.

Previous studies have shown that CD5-2 can have positive effects on the growth of blood vessels.

Also Read- Facebook Invests $1 mn To Boost Computer Science Education

“This drug has shown great promise for the treatment of several major health problems, in the eye and in the brain,” said Professor Jenny Gamble, head of Centenary’s Vascular Biology Programme.

The researchers now plan to conduct a full-scale clinical trial, Gamble said. (IANS)