Tuesday February 25, 2020

Eating Chocolate May Guard Against Diabetes

Having a significant amount of berries, tea and chocolate daily may help protect you from diabetes

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Eating Chocolate May Guard Against Diabetes
Eating Chocolate May Guard Against Diabetes. Pixabay

Having a significant amount of berries, tea and chocolate daily may help protect you from diabetes.

According to researchers from University of East Anglia (UEA) and King’s College London in Britain, high levels of flavonoids including anthocyanins and other compounds in berries, tea and chocolate could guard against type 2 diabetes.

High intakes of these dietary compounds are associated with lower insulin resistance and better blood glucose regulation, said the study published in the Journal of Nutrition.
Researchers studied nearly 2,000 healthy women volunteers.

They found that those who consumed plenty of anthocyanins and flavones had lower insulin resistance.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

“High insulin resistance is associated with type 2 diabetes, so what we are seeing is that people who eat foods rich in these two compounds – such as berries, herbs, red grapes, wine – are less likely to develop the disease,” said Aedin Cassidy from UEA’s Norwich Medical School.

Those who had anthocyanins in great quantity were least likely to suffer chronic inflammation – which is associated with many of today’s most pressing health concerns including diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular disease and cancer, she added.

Also Read: Avoid Diabetes With Yoga, Weight Lifting

“Those who consumed the most flavone compounds had improved levels of a protein (adiponectin) which helps regulate a number of metabolic processes including glucose levels,” said Cassidy.

What we do not yet know is exactly how much of these compounds are necessary to potentially reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes, she added. (IANS)

Next Story

Higher Testosterone Levels may Lead to Type 2 Diabetes in Women: Study

Higher testosterone levels ups diabetes risk in women

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Diabetes
Higher testosterone levels increases the risk of metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes in women, while reducing the risk in men. Pixabay

Health researchers have revealed that having genetically higher testosterone levels increases the risk of metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes in women, while reducing the risk in men.

Higher testosterone levels also increase the risks of breast and endometrial cancers in women, and prostate cancer in men, according to the study published in the journal Nature Medicine.

Despite finding a strong genetic component to circulating testosterone levels in men and women, the authors found that the genetic factors involved were very different between the sexes.

“Our findings provide unique insights into the disease impacts of testosterone. In particular they emphasise the importance of considering men and women separately in studies, as we saw opposite effects for testosterone on diabetes,” said study lead author Katherine Ruth from University of Exeter in UK.

For the findings, the research team used genome wide association studies (GWAS) in 4,25,097 UK Biobank participants to identify 2,571 genetic variations associated with differences in the levels of the sex hormone testosterone and its binding protein sex-hormone binding globulin (SHGB).

Diabetes
Researchers found that in women, genetically higher testosterone increases the risks of type 2 diabetes by 37 per cent, and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) by 51 per cent. Pixabay

The researchers verified their genetic analyses in additional studies, including the EPIC-Norfolk study and Twins UK, and found a high level of agreement with their results in UK Biobank.

The team next used an approach called Mendelian randomisation, which uses naturally occurring genetic differences to understand whether known associations between testosterone levels and disease are causal rather than correlative.

They found that in women, genetically higher testosterone increases the risks of type 2 diabetes by 37 per cent, and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) by 51 per cent.

However, they also found that having higher testosterone levels reduces T2D risk in men by 14 per cent.

Also Read- Union Minister Smriti Irani Gives Shout-Out To Upcoming Film ‘Thappad’, Says “Its Not Ok To Hit Women”

Additionally, they found that genetically higher testosterone levels increased the risks of breast and endometrial cancers in women, and prostate cancer in men.

“Our findings that genetically higher testosterone levels increase the risk of PCOS in women is important in understanding the role of testosterone in the origin of this common disorder, rather than simply being a consequence of this condition,” said study researcher John Perry from University of Cambridge. (IANS)