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Lord Ganesha, popularly known as Ganpati Bappa is a prominent god in Hindu mythology. Sankashti Chaturthi is celebrated to honour Hindu Lord Ganesha. Wikimedia

Karnataka, Sept 08, 2016: Amidst the sparkling and glittering celebrations of the most awaited Ganesh Chaturthi, the government of Karnataka has zeroed in on a rule in order to protect the environment and maintain the decorum and decency of the society.

The rule states the ban on idols made out of Plaster of Paris and also the prohibition of alcohol consumption for ten days during the festival, in the state. The rule though was declared this year itself, but due to the unawareness of the public, they were relaxed for the current year but will be strictly imposed from the very next year.


The initiation of this rule started three years ago on the villagers of Hullolhatti of Hukkeri taluk, by the chairman of the Karnataka State Temperance Board, Mr. Sachidananda Hegde. In an overwhelming wave of surprise, the proposal was humbly welcomed by the people of Karnataka that portray their sensitivity and accountability towards environmental issues.

To bring this into effect and in the fight against pollution, there exists a family of the Badigers, who in order to play their part for the development of this festival in a more effective and eco-friendly manner has started the production of clay-based idols of Lord Ganesha, reported the Hindu.

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This year in 2016, but for an aberration wherein two families brought PoP idols from outside the village, remaining 398 Hindu families observing the Ganesh Chaturthi celebrations have installed clay idols. Not just that, even the 12 Ganesh Mandals have installed clay idols, which set a welcome example for others to emulate, mentioned The Hindu reports.

Lastly, the households and the pandals have also astoundingly agreed to not play any obscene Bollywood music during these ten days but rather keep the entertainment quotient high through playing devotional songs only.

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It is indeed truly inspiring for the entire nation to witness such shining instances of such esteemed social responsibility. The combined effects of the insightful government and the responsible citizens, this power-house festival is surely set to be beautified with the colors of decency and environment-friendly elements.

– prepared by Ayushi Gaur of NewsGram.


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