Tuesday May 22, 2018

Eco-Friendly cremation is Easy to Handle but Difficult to Sell in India

3
//
424
Funeral pyre (Source Wikimedia: Commons)
Republish
Reprint
  • A traditional pyre requires around 600 kgs of wood and will burn for five to six hours
  • Eco-friendly pyre requires only 150 to 200 kilogram of wood and will last only for two to three hours
  • Study shows that around 60 million trees are cut every year for cremation purpose

Indian is a land of festivals, culture and rituals. Rituals are sequence of activities one performs during a particular event be it wedding, birth or death. But some rituals may harm environment. Rituals of death are one of them. But there is now a method to reduce pollution, Eco-Friendly Cremation.

Traditional funeral pyre. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

Process of cremation is thousand year old. When a body wrapped in white cloth on ladder carried by four people is cremated traditionally, emits toxic materials with pollution that can easily harm environment. But now that can be avoided by using eco-friendly pyres.

Follow NewsGram on Twitter: @newsgram1

Traditional system of cremation includes logs of wood which turns into deforestation. There are about 400 cremation ground in Delhi and each works in a traditional way. Around 7 million Hindus die every year. Study shows that around 60 million trees are cut every year for cremation purpose. A traditional pyre requires around 600 kilogram of wood and will burn for five to six hours.

Interior of Crematoria . Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

Vinod Kumar Agarwal, the head of Mokshda Green Cremation System in Delhi recently devised a pyre that is Eco-friendly and that can reduce the amount of greenhouse gases emitted by 60 percent. There are only 42 pyres all over the country and Agrawal is planning to make them 50 by end of the year. This Eco-friendly pyre requires only 150 to 200 kilogram of wood and will last only for two to three hours. Moreover, it is affordable, saving time and energy saving.

Follow NewsGram on Facebook: NewsGram.com

Even after so many benefits, Agrawal found it difficult to sell this idea to Indian masses. According to Mokshda worker, he cremates only 7 bodies per day while the other using traditional method creates a more than twice number of bodies as he does.

Crematoria in Kolkata. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

This is because around 80% of population in India is Hindu. According to Hindu sacred text, any soul cannot attain Moksha without Agni. This is the utmost reason that urges people to use traditional pyres. Moreover, this practice is prevalent for years, so it is not easy for anyone to give up so easily.

But people are getting more and more conscious towards the environment and are moving towards the use of eco-friendly crematoriums.

-prepared by Aparna Gupta, an intern with NewsGram. Twitter @writetoaparna99

ALSO READ:

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2016 NewsGram

  • Pashchiema Bhatia

    Now when we are aware of the practices which might be a threat to the environment, we must take the initiative to find an alternative.

  • AJ Krish

    Instead of following our religion blindly, we should look at issues from a broad perspective. If the environment can be saved and resources be conserved, why not utilize this method?

  • devika todi

    when the world will be polluted and it will be choking us to death, where will our rituals take us? instead of being stubborn about it, if we can think of the general good of the future, it will be better for all of us.

  • Pashchiema Bhatia

    Now when we are aware of the practices which might be a threat to the environment, we must take the initiative to find an alternative.

  • AJ Krish

    Instead of following our religion blindly, we should look at issues from a broad perspective. If the environment can be saved and resources be conserved, why not utilize this method?

  • devika todi

    when the world will be polluted and it will be choking us to death, where will our rituals take us? instead of being stubborn about it, if we can think of the general good of the future, it will be better for all of us.

Next Story

Kalki Stresses on The Importance of Eco-friendly Fashion

Actress Kalki Koechlin says adapting environmentally conscious fashion can make the world a better place.

0
//
12
Eco friendly Fashion
Eco-friendly fashion: The Golden Book Gown made of recycled book pages. Wikimedia

Actress Kalki Koechlin says adapting environmentally conscious fashion can make the world a better place.

“I grew up in an environment which is sustainable and eco-friendly in Auroville. I grew up with basic ethic of buying products which are sustainable,” Kalki told IANS in a recorded response.

“A lot of clothes which I wear are organic. Fashion is a big way through which we can change the environment… (We can change the world) by being environmentally conscious in our fashion statements and all our products,” she added.

The actress, who was speaking on the sidelines of Blue Carpet event, hosted by Sony BBC Earth for “Blue Planet II: One Ocean and The Deep”, feels that going organic is the way to go forward.

“If we start buying more organic products even for the household which are less harmful, it makes a huge difference.”

Kalki Koechlin
Bollywood actress Kalki Koechlin. Wikimedia

Kalki, who has featured in “Dev.D”, “Shaitan”, “Shanghai” and “Margarita with a Straw”, says families are like “mini countries with mini politics”.

“If you cannot figure out stuff in your family, don’t expect figuring out stuff in your country and the rest of the world,” she said.

The actress also praised “Blue Planet II: One Ocean and The Deep”. Narrated by ace British broadcaster and naturalist David Attenborough, “Blue Planet II” released in 48 PVR screens in 22 cities on May 18.

Also Read: Eco-Friendly Fabric Demands Propel Organic Cotton Farming in India

“Blue Planet II” is shot over 1,406 days with 125 expeditions across 39 countries and tells unique, untold stories of the ocean’s most astonishing creatures that will take your breath away.

“It gives us perspective in our life… There is a lot more going on this planet than we realise. We need to be more conscious if we want to survive.” (IANS)