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Enigmatic Mount Kailash: The abode of Lord Shiva

Hindu people believe that Lord Shiva, the destroyer of evil, resides in this mighty peak.

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The mighty Mount Kailash is followed to be a sacred site for people of different religions
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NEW DELHI: One of the most unearthed mysteries lies in the foothills of Mount Kailash. Its legendary tales are travelling since ages and to date, people are perplexed by it. The meaning of Mount Kailash is “precious jewel of eternal snow “and which signifies the eternal significance of this place.

Standing at 6718 meters above sea level, Mount Kailash is considered a very holy site by the Hindus, Jains and Buddhist people.  It is surrounded by four mighty rivers, the Indus, the Sutlej, the Brahmaputra, and the Karnali. One can dive into the breathtaking
charms of this mountain and can unearth the perfect serenity. If we go by the ancient belief, Mount Kailash holds the axis of life and death.

Hindu people believe that Lord Shiva, the destroyer of evil, resides in this mighty peak. The Buddhist stance on this mountain is, Buddha Demchok, who represents supreme bliss, stays at the top of it.

It is one of the very few unconquered mountains, due to its religious sentiments. Even the Chinese government has banned everyone from scaling this sacred mountain. Many people have tried climbing it but ended up never to be found again.

There are many theories going around Mount Kailash, which can perplex anyone. Let’s take a look some of them:

Manmade pyramid
The shape of the Mount Kailash stands unusual and reports surrounding makes sense out of it. As per the research report of Russians scientists, the exceptional shape of this peak is not at all a mountain but an ancient build manmade pyramid. They claim it to have a
pyramidal shape and if this proves to be true then Mount Kailash will be the largest Pyramid known to human civilization.

People also believe that this mountain keeps changing its place and thus whoever tries to climbs it, get lost easily.

The irrational aging
One of the strangest things to be experienced near this place is the mysterious facet of aging. It is been said that here the time duration of twelve hours equals to two weeks spend in any other place of this earth. The length of nails and hair grows too fast and aging process multiplies many folds near Mount Kailash.

There are many other paranormal activities also which have been recorded near this place and goes beyond the explanation of modern science.

The Thesis of Twin Lake
At the bottom of the mountain, there are two adjacent lakes. One is called by the name of the God and Devil’s lake. The saying goes around is that we all have two sides, one as the angel and the other as evil one. The theory is better explained saying that the angel is our
guardian, guiding us with its light of awakening our higher consciousness.

The twin lakes are situated at the bottom of peak
The twin lakes are situated at the bottom of peak

There are much more that goes into the unexplained history of Mount Kailash, which can be further speculated without any proof. Even the Hindu literature have mentioned the existence of such place, thus it verifies the very reality of mountain since ages. There is nothing that can be correlated to the theories of it and hence people believe the age-old ideology of this peak.

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The Other Side of “Hindu Pakistan”

Although, the mainstream parties stay away from nominating Hindus, this time there are many independent Hindu candidates contesting from general seats — mostly from the Sindh province

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The-Other-Side-of-“Hindu-Pakistan”
The Hindu population in Pakistan is about 1.8% according to the 2018 census, 0.2% more than that of the 1998 and the 1951 figures.

Sagarneel Sinha

Congress MP Shashi Tharoor’s remark that India would become a “Hindu Pakistan” if the BJP is elected again in 2019, sparked off a major debate among the political circles of the country. BJP didn’t let the opportunity go by launching a scathing attack on Tharoor and his party for insulting Hindus and Indian democracy, forcing the Congress party to distance itself from its own MP’s comment. Only one year is left for the next general elections and in a politically polarised environment such comments serve as masala for political battles where perception is an important factor among the electorates.

Actually, Tharoor, through his statement, is trying to convey that “India may become a
fundamentalist state just like its neighbour — Pakistan”. Tharoor is a shrewd politician and his remarks are mainly for political gains. The comments refer to our neighbour going to polls on 25 th of this month which has a long history of ignoring minorities where the state institutions serve as a tool for glorifying the religious majority bloc and ridiculing the minorities. This compelled me to ponder about the participation of the Hindus — the largest minority bloc of the country, in the upcoming polls.

There are total 37 reserved seats for minorities in Pakistan — 10 in the National Assembly
(Lower House), 4 in the Senate (Upper House) and 23 in various state legislatures — 9 in the Sindh assembly, 8 in Punjab and 3 each in Balochistan and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa. Pakistani Hindus, like other minorities have the dual voting rights in principle. But the reality is they have no rights to vote for their own representatives as the seats are reserved — means the distribution of these seats are at the discretion of parties’ leadership. Practically speaking, these reserved seats are meant for political parties not for minorities. In case of general seats, it is almost impossible for a Hindu candidate to win until and unless supported by the mainstream parties of the country. The bitter truth is — the mainstream parties have always ignored the Hindus by hesitating to field them from general seats. In 2013, only one Hindu candidate — Mahesh Kumar from the Tharparkar district won from a general seat, also became the only minority candidate to make it to the National Assembly from a general seat. This time too, he is nominated by the Pakistan People’s Party (PPP) — a major centre-left party of Pakistan. However, there are no other Hindu candidates for a general seat from the two other significant centre-right parties — former Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif’s Pakistan Muslim League-Nawaz (PML-N) and cricketer turned politician Imran Khan’s Tehreek-E-Insaf (PTI). Although, there is a Hindu candidate named Sanjay Berwani from Muttahida Qaumi Movement (MQM) — a Karachi (capital of Sindh province) based secular centrist party of Pakistan.

Shashi_tharoor
Congress MP Shashi Tharoor’s remark that India would become a “Hindu Pakistan” if the BJP is
elected again in 2019, sparked off a major debate among the political circles of the country.

The Hindu population in Pakistan is about 1.8% according to the 2018 census, 0.2% more than that of the 1998 and the 1951 figures. It means that despite the state’s hostile policies, Hindus have been able to remain stable in a highly Islamist polarised society. 90% of the Hindu population of the country lives in the Sindh province. Hindu population in Umerkot,Tharparkar and Mirpur Khas districts of the Sindh province stands at 49%, 46% and 33% respectively — making them the only three substantial Hindu districts of the country. The three districts have 5 National Assembly and 13 Provincial seats. However, Hindus have never well represented from these seats.

Although, the mainstream parties stay away from nominating Hindus, this time there are many independent Hindu candidates contesting from general seats — mostly from the Sindh province. Many of them belong to the Schedule caste — the Dalit community. A recent report based on Pakistan Election Commission’s data says that out of 2.5 lakh women of Tharparkar district, around 2 lakh of them are not included in the electoral list — means that they are not entitled to vote for the upcoming general elections. All over the country, there are about 1.21 crore women voters who will not be able to vote in the elections. The reason is the lack of an identity card. Most of them are poor who are unable to pay the expenses required for an identity card. This has made difficult for independent Hindu Dalit candidates like Sunita Parmar and Tulsi Balani as most of their supporters will not be voting in the upcoming polls. In Tharparkar district, around 33% percent are the Hindu Dalits — brushed aside by the mainstream parties. The reserved seat candidates are based on party nominations, where mainly the upper caste Hindus are preferred. Radha Bheel, a first time contestant and the chairperson of Dalit Suhaag Tehreek (DST), a Dalit organisation, says that the fight is for the rights of the lower socio-economic class and scheduled castes. Sunita, Tulsi, Radha and the other independent Hindu candidates know
that the possibility of winning from the general seats is bleak but for them the contest is for their own identity — an identity never recognised by the political parties and the establishment of Pakistan.