Saturday January 18, 2020

Erectile Dysfunction Causes cardiovascular risk among middle-aged men.

The researchers examined more than 1,900 men, aged between 60 to 78.

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Erectile Dysfunction Causes cardiovascular risk among middle-aged men.
Erectile Dysfunction Causes cardiovascular risk among middle-aged men., Flickr

Erectile dysfunction (ED) indicates greater cardiovascular risk, regardless of other risk factors, such as cholesterol, smoking and high blood pressure, researchers warn.

The findings, published in the journal Circulation, suggest that ED is an important telltale sign that can help physicians gauge cardiovascular risk among middle-aged men.

The researchers found that, among the participants of the study carried over four years, those who reported ED were twice as likely to experience heart attacks, cardiac arrests, sudden cardiac death and fatal or non-fatal strokes.

“Our results reveal that erectile dysfunction is, in and of itself, a potent predictor of cardiovascular risk,” said co-author Michael Blaha, Associate Professor at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore.

Human cardiovascular system
Human cardiovascular system, pixabay

According to the research, ED — defined as the inability to achieve or maintain an erection for satisfactory sexual intercourse — affects nearly 20 per cent of men over age 20.

Cardiovascular disease and ED share common risk factors, including obesity, hypertension, smoking, diabetes and metabolic syndrome — a condition marked by a cluster of features such as elevated blood sugar, hypertension and excess abdominal fat.

For the study, the researchers examined more than 1,900 men, aged between 60 to 78.

During the four-year follow-up, there were a total of 115 fatal and non-fatal heart attacks, fatal and non-fatal strokes, cardiac arrests and sudden cardiac deaths, the researchers said.

A greater proportion of men who reported ED (6.3 per cent) suffered heart attacks, cardiac arrests or strokes than men who didn’t report ED (2.6 per cent), they added.

A middle aged men
A middle aged men, Pixabay

When the researchers adjusted their analysis to eliminate the potential influence of other risk factors, that risk was somewhat lessened but still markedly higher — men with ED were nearly twice as likely to suffer cardiovascular events than men without ED.

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Limited evidence of a link between ED and cardiovascular disease has emerged over the last several years, but results of this latest study provide what researchers say is the strongest indication to date that sexual dysfunction indicates heightened cardiovascular risk, the researchers noted.(IANS)

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Children of Diabetic Mothers May Develop Heart Risks: Study

Kids born of diabetic mothers at heart risk

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Diabetes- heart
Children of mothers with diabetes have increased rates of early onset heart diseases. Pixabay

Children of mothers with diabetes have increased rates of early onset cardiovascular disease or CVD (conditions affecting the heart or blood vessels) from childhood up to the age of 40, the researchers have warned.

The increased rates were more pronounced among children of mothers with a history of CVD or diabetic complications, said the study published in the journal The BMJ.

“our study provides evidence that children of mothers with diabetes, especially those with a history of CVD or with diabetic complications, had increased rates of early onset CVD throughout the early decades of life,” said study researchers from Aarhus University in Denmark.

If this association is shown to be causal, preventing, screening, and treating diabetes in women of childbearing age could be important not only for improving the health of the women but also for reducing long term risks of CVD in their offspring, the researchers added

The number of women diagnosed with diabetes before or during pregnancy has increased globally, and children of these women are more likely to have risk factors for future CVD, such as high blood pressure and high blood sugar levels.

It is unclear, however, whether or to what extent exposure to diabetes in the womb increases the risk of developing CVD in offspring over a lifetime.

Heart disease
Children with diabetic mothers may develop CVD which may increase heart complications. Pixabay

So an international team of researchers set out to evaluate associations between diabetes diagnosed before or during pregnancy and early onset CVD in children during their first four decades of life.

They base their findings on national registry data for over 2.4 million children born without congenital heart disease in Denmark from 1977 to 2016.

Diabetes was categorised as pregestational (before pregnancy) or gestational (during pregnancy) and women with diabetic complications were identified.

Other potentially influential factors, such as mother’s age, education, lifestyle and medical history were also taken into account.

During up to 40 years of follow-up, children of mothers with diabetes had a 29 per cent increased overall rate of early onset CVD compared with children of mothers who did not have diabetes (cumulative risks: 17.8 per cent vs 13.1 per cent ).

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The researchers also found higher rates for specific types of CVD children of mothers with diabetes, particularly heart failure (45 per cent), hypertensive disease (78 per cent), deep vein thrombosis (82 per cent), and pulmonary embolism (91 per cent).

Increased rates were seen in each age group in childhood (before 20 years of age) and early adulthood (from 20 to 40 years of age), regardless of the type of diabetes they were exposed to (pregestational or gestational) and rates were similar for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, the study said. (IANS)