Tuesday March 26, 2019

Essential medicines to cost less as govt caps prices of new drugs

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New Delhi: Come Diwali, the treatment of diabetes, hypertension and pneumonia will cost less in the country with the Drug price regulator National Pharmaceutical Pricing Authority (NPPA) capping the prices of as many as 18 new brands of essential medicines.

According to reports, most of these new brands of medicines are expected to be launched in the market within a fortnight.

Fixing the maximum retail price of these medicines at the average of MRP of all medicines available in that particular therapeutic segment with at least 1% market share, the regulator has brought these medicines under price regulation using paragraph 5 of the Drugs Price Control Order (DPCO), 2013.

Leading pharmaceutical companies like Cipla, Merck, Franco Indian, Alembic Pharma and Unichem etc. will be affected due to the price fixation by the NPPA.

Failing to comply with the prescribed retail price will have consequences for the erring firms.

“The concerned manufacturer/ marketing company shall be liable to deposit the overcharged amount along with the interest thereon under the provisions of the DPCO, 2013”, the NPPA said, adding that “if a company was planning to discontinue manufacture or sale of any of these medicines, then it would have to seek permission from the regulator six months in advance.”

The NPPA further said, “If any medicine was priced lower than the ceiling fixed by the regulator, then companies selling such drugs should maintain the existing or lower retail price.”

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Cardiovascular Events Cause 58% Deaths Among Diabetics

The medicine likewise helps lower the amount of sodium in the body and reduce triglyceride levels and blood pressure

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Diabetes
Representational image. Pixabay

Fifty-eight percent of deaths among people with type 2 diabetes are due to cardiovascular events, a leading Mexican expert has said.

“Patients who live with this disease have a greater risk of premature death or disability derived from cardiovascular events,” Hector Sanchez Mijangos, President of the Mexican Diabetes Federation, told Efe news.

The specialist said that the high glucose levels associated with diabetes damage blood vessels, resulting in problems with blood pressure and vision, joint pain and other maladies.

Data from the World Health Organization indicate that more 442 million people suffer from type 2 diabetes.

Mexico’s Health Secretariat has found that while roughly 13 million inhabitants of the Aztec nation are living with diabetes, only half of those afflicted know they have the disease.

In 2015 alone, according to Mijangos, there were more than 98,000 premature deaths in Mexico related to diabetes and the average age of those who died was 66.7 years old.

Diabetes
Representational image. Pixabay

“This is regrettable, because these people could have lived roughly another 15 years,” he said.

According to the 2012 National Health and Nutrition Survey, only 25 percent of Mexicans suffering with diabetes are managing their condition adequately.

That figure illustrates “why our greatest challenge continues to be access and adherence to treatment”, Mijangos said.

Also Read- Researchers Discover Balance of Two Enzymes That May Help Treat Pancreatic Cancer

To improve treatment options, Mexican health authorities in January issued an approval for the use of canagliflozin, a drug that helps reduce the amount of blood glucose reabsorbed by the kidneys, which in turns causes more glucose to be eliminated through urination.

“With this medicine, a person can lose 100 milligrams of glucose per day as well as about 400 kilocalories (4,000 calories) a day, which also helps with weight loss,” Mijangos said.

The medicine likewise helps lower the amount of sodium in the body and reduce triglyceride levels and blood pressure.

A scientific trial involving more than 10,000 patients worldwide showed that when combined with conventional treatment, canagliflozin can reduce the incidence of cardiovascular events by up to 18 percent. (IANS)