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Europe Hits Google With Record $5 Billion Antitrust Fine, Appeal Ahead

The Commission's decision, according to Google CEO Sundar Pichai, sends a troubling signal in favour of proprietary systems over open platforms

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Google creating publishing platform for local news publishers. Pixabay

Accusing Google of illegally using Android mobile devices to strengthen dominance of its search engine, the European Commission on Wednesday imposed a record fine of 4.34 billion euros ($5 billion) on the tech giant, which said it would appeal against the decision.

According to the Commission, Google has imposed since 2011 illegal restrictions on Android device manufacturers and mobile network operators to cement its dominant position in general Internet search.

Google must now bring the conduct effectively to an end within 90 days or face additional penalty, the ruling said.

Reacting to the ruling, Google CEO Sundar Pichai said the company will appeal against the Commission’s decision.

“Rapid innovation, wide choice, and falling prices are classic hallmarks of robust competition. Android has enabled this and created more choice for everyone, not less. This is why we intend to appeal today’s Android decision,” Pichai wrote in a blog post immediately after the verdict.
The decision, according to the Google CEO, ignores the fact that Android phones compete with iOS phones.

“It also misses just how much choice Android provides to thousands of phone makers and mobile network operators who build and sell Android devices; to millions of app developers around the world who have built their businesses with Android; and billions of consumers who can now afford and use cutting-edge Android smartphones,” Pichai wrote.

According to Commissioner Margrethe Vestager who is in charge of competition policy, their case is about three types of restrictions that Google has imposed on Android device manufacturers and network operators to ensure that traffic on Android devices goes to the Google search engine.

“In this way, Google has used Android as a vehicle to cement the dominance of its search engine. These practices have denied rivals the chance to innovate and compete on the merits. They have denied European consumers the benefits of effective competition in the important mobile sphere. This is illegal under EU antitrust rules,” Vestager explained.

Google CEO Sundar Pichai
Google CEO Sundar Pichai. (Wikimedia Commons)

In particular, Google has required manufacturers to pre-install the Google Search app and browser app (Chrome), as a condition for licensing Google’s app store (the Play Store).

The company made payments to certain large manufacturers and mobile network operators on condition that they exclusively pre-installed the Google Search app on their devices.

The Commission also found that Google prevented manufacturers wishing to pre-install Google apps from selling even a single smart mobile device running on alternative versions of Android that were not approved by Google.

The Commission’s decision, according to Google CEO Sundar Pichai, sends a troubling signal in favour of proprietary systems over open platforms.

Pichai said the company has always agreed that with size comes responsibility.

Also Read: Google Gave Notice of it’s First Private Transatlantic Subsea Cable Project

“A healthy, thriving Android ecosystem is in everyone’s interest, and we’ve shown we’re willing to make changes.

“But we are concerned that today’s decision will upset the careful balance that we have struck with Android, and that it sends a troubling signal in favour of proprietary systems over open platforms,” he added.

The Commission, however, said that as Google obtains the vast majority of its revenues via its flagship product, the Google search engine, the company understood early on that the shift from desktop PCs to mobile Internet, which started in mid-2000, would be a fundamental change for Google Search.

So, Google developed a strategy to anticipate the effects of this shift, and to make sure that users would continue to use Google Search also on their mobile devices, the Commission said. (IANS)

Next Story

Google To Test Updating Pre-loaded Apps Without Signing Into Account

Google is advising developers to make sure that any updates to their app work properly in the absence of a Google account. 

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Google is advising developers to make sure that any updates to their app work properly in the absence of a Google account. Pixabay

Google is planning to roll-out a functionality that would auto-update pre-loaded apps via Google Play even when users are not signed into their Google accounts.

With this feature, the search engine giant aims to provide a more consistent app experience for users in the coming months, Android Police reported on Friday.

Previously, if users were not signed into their Google accounts, pre-installed apps on their devices, including the Play Store, were cut off from updates.

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Previously, if users were not signed into their Google accounts, pre-installed apps on their devices, including the Play Store, were cut off from updates. Pixabay

“In the coming months, Google Play will begin testing a new feature that will automatically allow Google Play to update pre-loaded apps and with users having an option to turn off this feature at any time if they wish. This should also help developers reduce overhead costs required to support obsolete app versions,” the report quoted Google as saying in a letter to the developers.

Google is advising developers to make sure that any updates to their app work properly in the absence of a Google account.
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The feature would only apply to devices shipped with Android Lollipop or newer OS versions, the report added.

It is yet not clear by when would the feature be officially released for all Android users. (IANS)