Tuesday April 23, 2019
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Even odd rule: Common man most affected

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By Harshmeet Singh

Delhi Government’s decision to prohibit the odd and even numbered private vehicles on alternate days was probably the biggest news to come out yesterday. The decision was lauded by many, refuted by some but ignored by none. Within hours of the news, different memes started to do rounds on the internet and the public started to voice their opinions on the social media. The speed at which the news spread highlighted the impact of even odd rule on the common man.

Delhi won’t be the first place in the world to implement such a rule. The even-odd rationing has been enforced in a number of other countries for varying reasons. In 1979, when Iran and Iraq were going through turbulent times and weren’t able to contribute to the world’s oil output, the oil prices shot up considerably. To tackle the situation, the US went for odd-even rationing, allowing even and odd numbered vehicles to buy gasoline on alternate days. Similar strategies, albeit to restrict the burgeoning traffic, have been put into action in cities such as Athens, Mexico city, Manila and Quito (Ecuador). Beijing also made use of this rule for 2 months prior to the 2008 Olympics to improve the air quality in the city.

This move by the Delhi Government comes after the Delhi High Court’s remark that living in Delhi is similar to “living in a gas chamber”. However, despite all the good intentions that are behind this decision, it is at best, a knee-jerk reaction from the government. This decision follows the controversial four-hold salary hike that the Delhi MLAs gifted themselves as an advance New Year bonanza.

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The new traffic rule would hit the lower and middle class the hardest while having little impact on the high-class people, most of whom own more than one car anyway. Considering the purchasing power of the affluent class in Delhi, this decision may very well result in a spike in car sales in the National capital. For the middle-class populace, who used to take their motorbike or the budget car at work, it is time to shell out extra bucks for those autorickshaws who refuse to go by the meter.

Pawandeep Singh, a resident of Dwarka in Delhi, drives to work to Gurgaon every day, along with his wife. He is ready to invest in another car to avoid the hassles. He tells NewsGram, “If I have to go to Gurgaon from Dwarka, there is no adequate metro connectivity. I would be willing to buy a second hand car with an odd-numbered number plate rather than changing multiple buses and autos.”

Urvashi Chaurasia, who lives in Saket, says that she is ‘surprised’ by this ‘mindless’ decision. In an interaction with NewsGram, she says, “I haven’t given a thought to what I would do after this mindless decision. But I am certainly not going to travel in those overcrowded buses and over-priced autos.”

The Kejriwal government seems to have jumped the gun with this decision. It should have first put the city’s public transport in order before going for such a radical step. The number of DTC buses is way below the requirement. The metro coaches are packed on most of the routes and their frequency is much lower than adequate. Both of these modes of transport fail to offer the last mile connectivity which is dearly needed in a huge city like Delhi. It gives an opportunity to the autorickshaws to make merry and demand higher fares.

The only option left for the common man to avoid much hassles is car pooling. But the deteriorating law and order situation in the city can make anyone skeptical at the thought of sharing his car with someone else. Delhi seems to be unprepared for such a move on all counts. With public transport that is nowhere near ‘world class’, the common man can’t afford road space rationing.

Next Story

Now The Delhi Government Comes Up With The Food Wastage Check Policy At Social Gatherings

"If the food is surplus due to lower turnout of the guest and resultant less consumption, then it shall be the responsibility of organiser of the social function to remove that food from the social function site, immediately after the completion of the duration of that social function," it says.

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food wastage
"Further, officers of respective ULB will conduct random or complaint-based inspection. The violations would be noted with proofs by the inspecting officers without the disrupting the function. In the event of violation of any of the conditions, the penalty would be imposed against violators under specific act/rules/orders." Pixabay

The Delhi government has drafted a policy to keep a check on the wastage of food at social functions in the national capital.

All organisers and caterers will have to register themselves with NGOs to manage the surplus and leftover food for distribution among the underprivileged, says the draft policy.

“The caterer should make proper arrangements to handover fresh surplus and leftover food to these NGOs,” reads the Draft ‘Policy for Holding Social Functions in Hotels, Motels and Low-Density Residential Area (LDRA) in National Capital Territory of Delhi’.

According to the draft policy, the owner, organiser, and the caterer must have the necessary permissions including FSSAI license from Delhi’s Department of Food Safety, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare to run their kitchens or to sell or serve prepared food for the guest and the consumer.

“They should be registered with some NGO to manage surplus/leftover food by distributing the same among underprivileged. The caterer should make proper arrangements to handover fresh surplus and leftover food to these NGOs.

The food preparation should be according to the ceiling of the number of guests as per prescribed capacity of the motel and LDRA. The number of guests cannot exceed the guest limit approved by the Urban Local Body (ULB) for that function site, it says.

“If the food is surplus due to lower turnout of the guest and resultant less consumption, then it shall be the responsibility of organiser of the social function to remove that food from the social function site, immediately after the completion of the duration of that social function,” it says.

food
According to the draft policy, the owner, organiser, and the caterer must have the necessary permissions including FSSAI license from Delhi’s Department of Food Safety, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare to run their kitchens or to sell or serve prepared food for the guest and the consumer. Pixabay

The Commissioner Food Safety shall ensure that the above conditions are strictly followed; any violation thereof would invite action from the deployed officers by the Commissioner Food Safety, the draft policy reads.

The rules will be enforced by periodical inspections, which shall be conducted by officers of various state stakeholder agencies.

“Further, officers of respective ULB will conduct random or complaint-based inspection. The violations would be noted with proofs by the inspecting officers without the disrupting the function. In the event of violation of any of the conditions, the penalty would be imposed against violators under specific act/rules/orders.”

“The capacity of the space should be determined by multiplying the total number of car parking available by four or by means the number of persons obtained by dividing the gross floor area of the premises by occupant load factor at 1.5 sqm, whichever is less,” says the document.

It said adding that the total number of days on which a social function can be organised are restricted to 120 days in authorized/approved spaces.

food wastage
The food preparation should be according to the ceiling of the number of guests as per prescribed capacity of the motel and LDRA. The number of guests cannot exceed the guest limit approved by the Urban Local Body (ULB) for that function site, it says.
Pixabay

The draft also said that motels and LDRA should be constructed as per sanctioned building plan.
“Minimum area of LDRA must be equals or more than 2.5 acres. Only such Motel and LDRA houses should be permitted to hold social functions which have proper access to the road from a main road (60 ft wide or more) and the LDRA should not be located at a road which ends in a dead end,” it said.

According to an official from the government, the decision to formulate a comprehensive policy regulating social functions was taken after the direction of the Supreme Court.

“Further, in view of Motel Policy of Ministry of Tourism 1995, policy for holding social functions in Farmhouses of Government of NCT of Delhi, Master Plan 2021(MPD 2021), amendments in MPD-2021 notified in 2013, a comprehensive policy was required to be drafted,” the official told IANS on the condition of anonymity.

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The Chief Secretary has constituted a committee of four officers, including Principal Secretaries of Urban Development and Health, Chief Executive Officer, Delhi Jal Board and Member Secretary, Delhi Pollution Control Committee, to draft the policy.

“Accordingly, the committee after consultation with all stakeholders drafted the policy keeping in mind concerns of Environment Pollution (Prevention and Control) Authority (EPCA) and Supreme Court such as stop the use of perennially installed semi-permanent pandals, nuisance of parking on outside road of the venue, safety of guests and general public, stop the misuse of scarce resources like water and stop any kind of pollution or degradation of Environment,” the official said. (IANS)