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Even Your Dog Has Its Own Personality Traits

Dogs' personalities can also predict many important life outcomes suggesting that canines' personalities influence how close they feel to their owners, biting behaviour and even chronic illness.

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The findings showed that dogs and owners share specific personality traits indicating that extroverted humans rated their dogs as more excitable and active. Pixabay

Not only humans, but their canine friend too have moods and personality traits that shape how they react in certain situations, says a new study.

The study revealed that, like humans, dogs’ personalities are likely to change overtime.

Dogs’ personalities can also predict many important life outcomes suggesting that canines’ personalities influence how close they feel to their owners, biting behaviour and even chronic illness.

“When humans go through big changes in life, their personality traits can change. We found that this also happens with dogs and to a surprisingly large degree,” said lead author William Chopik Professor from Michigan State University in the US.

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Exposure to obedience classes to dogs and training were associated with more positive personality traits across the dog’s lifespan, Chopik suggested. Pixabay

“We expected the dogs’ personalities to be fairly stable because they don’t have wild lifestyle changes humans do, but they actually change a lot. We uncovered similarities to their owners, the optimal time for training and even a time in their lives that they can get more aggressive toward other animals,” said Chopik.

While older dogs are much harder to train, the right time to teach a dog obedience is around the age of six when it has crossed the puppy stage, but before it is too set in its ways, Chopik noted.

Exposure to obedience classes to dogs and training were associated with more positive personality traits across the dog’s lifespan, Chopik suggested.

The study, published in the Journal of Research in Personality, surveyed owners of more than 1,600 dogs, including 50 different breeds.

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A Cape Cod-style home, a simple, rectangular structure, in Cape Cod, Massachusetts. (Photo by Carol Highsmith). VOA

The findings showed that dogs and owners share specific personality traits indicating that extroverted humans rated their dogs as more excitable and active.

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Owners high in negative emotions rated their dogs as more fearful, active and less responsive to training.

Further, owners who rated themselves as agreeable rated their dogs as less fearful and less aggressive to people and animals. (IANS)

Next Story

Household Contaminants May Cause Infertility in Men, Dogs

The researchers carried out identical experiments for both species using samples of sperm from donor men and stud dogs, living in the same region

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The results showed that the pups' attractiveness was lowest at birth and increased to a maximum before 10 weeks of age before declining and then levelling off.
Representational Image. pixabay

Environmental contaminants found in home and diet have the same adverse effects on male fertility both in humans and domestic dogs, finds a new study highlighting the decline in sperm quality in both the species over the past few years.

The findings, published in the journal Scientific Reports, showed the chemicals — at concentrations relevant to environmental exposure — have the same damaging effect on sperm of both man and dog.

“We know when human sperm motility is poor, DNA fragmentation is increased and that human male infertility is linked to increased levels of DNA damage in sperm,” said co-author Rebecca Sumner, postdoctoral student at the University of Nottingham, Britain.

“We now believe this is the same in pet dogs because they live in the same domestic environment and are exposed to the same household contaminants,” Sumner said.

Family walk with dog. Pixabay

For the study, the team tested the effects of two man-made chemicals — the common plasticiser DEHP, widely used in the home (e.g. carpets, clothes, toys) and the industrial chemical polychlorinated biphenyl 153, which although banned globally, remains widely detectable in the environment, including food.

The researchers carried out identical experiments for both species using samples of sperm from donor men and stud dogs, living in the same region.

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“This new study supports our theory that the domestic dog is indeed a ‘sentinel’ or mirror for human male reproductive decline. Our findings suggest man-made chemicals, widely used in home and working environment, may be responsible for the decline in sperm quality,” lead author Richard Lea from the varsity noted. (IANS)