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Exclusive: Documentary ‘The Absent House’ talks about the Need of Sustainable Development

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‘The Absent House’
A still from the documentary ‘The Absent House’
  • The movie is directed by Ruben Abruna and was showcased by CMS Vatavaran at India Habitat Centre
  • The documentary is based on how Fernando got the idea of doing more with less from Buckminister Fuller and built a house that has no roof
  • In the times of climate change happening so fast, ‘The Absent House’ delivers a message that we can live without harming the environment 

June 29, 2017:

Is there a need at all to show some accountability for sustainable development? How will it affect the modern world? Well, needless to say, we have to do lots to save up resources for the future generations and not wasting them. NewsGram got in touch with CMS Vatavaran on the film “The Absent House”.

What is sustainable development?

Well, sustainable development is one such form of development that consists of usage of energy resources that can be used again and again without harming the environment so that the planet can be saved for the future generations to come. The term sustainable development came into being when people understood the fact that the resources they are using are not environment-friendly and they need to save the planets for their future generations to come and perish on this planet just like we did.

Nowadays, a lot of discussions are going on for sustainable development in India and CMS Vatavaran is one such foundation which works for the environment. It showcased its documentary film ‘The Absent House’ from the annual film festival at the India Habitat Centre on 19th June 2017. The film is based on the Puerto Rican architect Fernando Abruna Charneco who made his home without roofs and giving priority to our very own mother nature. People called him crazy for being a visionary on the making a house without a roof but they didn’t understand the purpose behind it but when they understood about the project, many people have started considering him as a true visionary towards climate change.

The documentary is based on how Fernando Abruna Charneco got the idea of doing more with less from Buckminster Fuller, who invented the Dymaxion Car and Geodesic Dome. The house that Fernando built has no roofs but that is for the room to be properly ventilated and being lit most of the time. So that is would not be wasting energy. He also made the house in a way that it doesn’t require any water or electricity. All the water is stored from the rainwater and the electricity is supplied by the sun so that the resources do not contribute to pollution of the environment. Even the toilets are water free so that the water isn’t wasted.

In the times of climate change happening so fast, ‘The Absent House’ delivers a message that we can live without harming the environment by sustainable development and can leave the earth and resources for the future generation.

The movie is directed by Ruben Abruna and was showcased by CMS vatavaran who is going to host their 9th edition of CMS vatavaran film competition and the organisation CMS (Centre for Media Studies) is a non-profit development research and facilitative think tank which works towards responsible governance and equitable development.

– Reported by Sumit Balodi of NewsGram. Twitter: @sumit_balodi

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House Passes Equality Act, Sweeping Bill to Expand Gay Rights

Democrats in the House approved sweeping anti-discrimination legislation Friday that would extend civil rights protections to LGBT people

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House, Equality Act, Bill, Gay Rights
Rep. David Cicilline, D-R.I., speaks before a House vote on the Equality Act of 2019, an LGBT rights measure, at the Capitol in Washington, May 17, 2019. The bill later passed the House 236-1. VOA

Democrats in the House approved sweeping anti-discrimination legislation Friday that would extend civil rights protections to LGBT people by prohibiting discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity. The protections would extend to employment, housing, loan applications, education, public accommodations and other areas.

Called the Equality Act, the bill is a top priority of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, who said it would bring the nation “closer to equal liberty and justice for all.”

Sexual orientation and gender identity “deserve full civil rights protections — in the workplace and in every place, education, housing, credit, jury service, public accommodations,” Pelosi said.

The vote was 236-173, with every Democrat voting in favor, along with eight Republicans. Cheers and applause broke out on the House floor as the bill crossed the threshold for passage.

House, Equality Act, Bill, Gay Rights
Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., leaves the chamber after passage of the Equality Act of 2019, anti-discrimination legislation that would extend civil rights protections to LGBT people by prohibiting discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity, at the Capitol in Washington, May 17, 2019. VOA

The legislation’s chief sponsor, Rep. David Cicilline, D-R.I., said it affirmed fairness and equality as core American values and ensured that “members of the LGBTQ community can live their lives free from the fear of legal discrimination of any kind.”

Cicilline, who is gay, called equal treatment under the law a founding principle of the United States, adding, “It’s absurd that, in 2019, members of the LGBTQ community can be fired from their jobs, denied service in a restaurant or get thrown out of their apartment because of their sexual orientation or gender identify.”

GOP opposition

Most Republicans oppose the bill and call it another example of government overreach. Several GOP lawmakers spoke against it Friday on the House floor. President Donald Trump is widely expected to veto the legislation if it reaches his desk.

At a news conference Thursday, the Republicans said the bill would jeopardize religious freedom by requiring acceptance of a particular ideology about sexuality and sexual identity.

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Rep. Vicky Hartzler, R-Mo., called the legislation “grossly misnamed” and said it was “anything but equalizing.”

The bill “hijacks” the 1964 Civil Rights Act to create “a brave new world of ‘discrimination’ based on undefined terms of sexual orientation and gender identity,” Hartzler said. The legislation threatens women’s sports, shelters and schools, and could silence female athletes, domestic abuse survivors and other women, she said.

A similar bill in the Senate has been co-sponsored by all but one Senate Democrat, but faces long odds in the Republican-controlled chamber.

‘Poison pills’

A Trump administration official who asked not be identified, because he was not authorized to speak publicly about the president’s intentions, said the White House “opposes discrimination of any kind and supports the equal treatment of all. However, this bill in its current form is filled with poison pills that threaten to undermine parental and conscience rights.”

House, Equality Act, Bill, Gay Rights
FILE – Rep. Vicky Hartzler, R-Mo., left, speaks to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, March 25, 2014. VOA

Some critics also said the bill could jeopardize Title IX, the law prohibiting sex discrimination in federally funded education programs. Former tennis star Martina Navratilova co-wrote an opinion piece in The Washington Post urging lawmakers not to “make the unnecessary and ironic mistake of sacrificing the enormously valuable social good that is female sports in their effort to secure the rights of transgender women and girls.”

Ahead of the vote, Rep. Jody Hice, R-Ga., called the House bill “horrifying” and said it could cause Catholic schools to lose federal grants for school lunches or require faith-based adoption agencies to place children with same-sex couples.

House, Equality Act, Bill, Gay Rights
FILE – Rep. Jody Hice, R-Ga., speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington, June 17, 2015. VOA

Neena Chaudhry, a lawyer for the National Women’s Law Center, said the bill does not undermine Title IX, because courts have already found that Title IX protects against gender-identity discrimination.

“It is way past time to fully open the doors of opportunity for every American,” said Sen. Jeff Merkley, D-Ore., one of the Senate bill’s lead sponsors. “Let’s pass the Equality Act, and let us rejoice in the bells of freedom ringing for every American.”

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In the Senate, Republican Sen. Susan Collins of Maine also supports the bill, while Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin of West Virginia is the sole Democrat who is not a co-sponsor.

The eight House Republicans who voted for the bill Friday were Reps. Susan Brooks of Indiana, Mario Diaz-Balart of Florida, Brian Fitzpatrick of Pennsylvania, Will Hurd of Texas, Greg Walden of Oregon and New York lawmakers John Katko, Tom Reed and Elise Stefanik. (VOA)