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The delicate balance between the media and judiciary. Unsplash

How was godman Chandraswami exposed despite the tantric gurus’ close association with prominent leaders and media barons? How was the Fodder Scam exposed in 1990 that eventually led to the arrest of Lalu Prasad Yadav and for which he is still serving time?

How did editors and investigative reporters reveal murky arms deals, such as the Bofors scandal? Is ‘paid news’ the new normal in Indian media? How did this game of corruption start?


What were the political pressures on senior editors like Vinod Mehta and Kuldip Nayar that led to their resignations?

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“Power, Press, and Politics” (Bloomsbury) is a groundbreaking, insider account of the workings of the Indian media – both print and electronic, and English, Hindi, and regional publications – from the acclaimed journalist and Padma Shri awardee Alok Mehta. Deriving from his experience spanning 50 years, Mehta brings to life these incidents and cases as he had been right in the eye of these storms. Starting his career from a news agency and a Hindi daily, Mehta worked with leading media houses, such as The Times of India, Hindustan Times, Outlook Group, Dainik Bhaskar, and NaiDunia, sharing a close association with some of the finest editors and journalists of the country.


A powerful commentary on the Indian media, Unsplash

Citing various landmark cases and judgments, Mehta throws light on the delicate balance between the media and judiciary, both of which are crucial to the health of our democracy. Having helmed the Editors Guild of India, he has had the privileged access to various significant reports, which have been included in this splendidly researched work.

ALSO READ: The Best Shows That Use Politics As A Springboard For Fictional Drama

A powerful commentary on the Indian media, this is a must-read for media students, institutions, and anyone who wishes to understand the working and challenges of the media. Known for his unwavering stand for what is right, Mehta had uncovered some of the biggest stories in India. His deep insights also make him a popular TV commentator. He has written over 20 books on journalism, social issues, and political personalities. He has spent a considerable part of his early career in Germany and has traveled to over 40 countries in pursuit of understanding the political and social landscapes of these countries.

A flagbearer of journalism, Mehta has been an active member of multiple bodies of the fraternity, including the Secretary-General and later the President of Editors Guild of India (2006). The recipient of several awards, Mehta was awarded the Padma Shri in 2009 for his contribution to journalism. (IANS/SP)


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IANS

According to him Amitabh Bachchan is a great actor in the industry.

Bollywood actor Abhishek Bachchan shares how he feels when people compare him with his father Amitabh Bachchan on the singing reality show 'Sa Re Ga Ma Pa'. He also requests contestant Rajshree Bag to sing a track 'Bahon Mein Chale Aao' featuring his mother Jaya Bachchan.

Abhishek said after looking at the performance of Rajshree, who is often compared with Lata Mangeshkar on the show, that she reminds him of being compared with his father. "Rajshree, whenever I have got the chance to watch the show, I've seen people compare you to Lata didi. It actually reminded me about how people compare me with my father and ask me how I feel about it."

According to him Amitabh Bachchan is a great actor in the industry and this is what he says to everyone making these comparisons. "My answer to them is that there's no greater actor in this film industry than Amitabh Bachchan and if I'm being compared to him, I am sure I must have done something good."

"Similarly, your voice has a different kind of magic like Lata ji and that's why people are comparing your voice with her. I feel you should always take this as a compliment," he concluded. 'Sa Re Ga Ma Pa' airs on Saturday and Sunday on Zee TV. (IANS/ MBI)


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Photo by Aaron Burden on Unsplash

Winters in India have always beckoned for that hot, steaming bowl of tomato and pepper rasam or the mellow, millet based Raab.

By IANSlife

Winters in India have always beckoned for that hot, steaming bowl of tomato and pepper rasam or the mellow, millet based Raab. Certain dishes like sarson ka saag, undhiyu, nimona pulao are winter specialites in the country. Seasonal food has always been an Indian speciality -- we switch our choice in fruits, vegetables, sometimes even grains with the onset of different season. The preference of using specific ingredients during certain climates is visible in our sweets as well. It's common to find local and traditional delicacies made of jaggery, instead of sugar during the winters. Case in point -- the Nolen Gur Rasgulla, a speciality made in Odisha and West Bengal between November to February.

Sarson Ka Saag | Sarson ka saag is traditional Punjabi dish Certain dishes like sarson ka saag, undhiyu, nimona pulao are winter specialites in the country. | Flickr

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Pixabay

Just three minutes of exposure to deep red light once a week, when delivered in the morning, can significantly improve declining eyesight, finds a new study.

Just three minutes of exposure to deep red light once a week, when delivered in the morning, can significantly improve declining eyesight, finds a new study. The study, published in the journal Scientific Reports, found there was, on average, a 17 per cent improvement in participants' colour contrast vision when exposed to three minutes of 670 nanometre (long wavelength) deep red light in the morning and the effects of this single exposure lasted for at least a week.

However, when the same test was conducted in the afternoon, no improvement was seen. "We demonstrate that one single exposure to long wave deep red light in the morning can significantly improve declining vision, which is a major health and wellbeing issue, affecting millions of people globally," said lead author, Glen Jeffery from the University College London.

woman wearing glasses measuring device Using a provided LED device, all participants were exposed to three minutes of 670nm deep red light in the morning between 8 a.m. and 9 a.m | Photo by Hush Naidoo Jade Photography on Unsplash

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