Tuesday August 14, 2018
Home Uncategorized Exposure to a...

Exposure to airborne ultrasound causes head related diseases

0
//
82
Republish
Reprint

New Delhi: Places like railway station, museums, sports stadium, libraries, schools has higher expose to airborne ultrasound which can lead to diseases like nausea, dizziness, migraine, fatigue and tinnitus.

According to the university of Southampton, people are being exposed to airborne ultrasound without their knowledge in public places. Loudspeakers, door sensors, public addressing system can generate airborne ultrasound in public places.

Professor Tim Leighton collected readings of very high frequency/ultrasonic VHF/US fields in several public buildings using smartphones and tablets equipped with an app. The findings were then calibrated with two or three independent microphone and audio data systems.

Study author Professor Tim Leighton found that members of the public were exposed to VHF/US levels over 20 kHz, which is the threshold of the current guidelines.

People who are unaware of this airborne exposure are complaining, for themselves and their children.

One in 20 people between the age of 40-49 years is suffering from hearing threshold that is a minimum of 20(DB) which becomes more sensitive at 20KH than that of people aged between 30-39.

Five percent of the People between the age of 5-19 are likely to have 20KH threshold that of 60(DB) more sensitive than the median for the 30-39 year age group.

The current reports are not capable for fighting with the mass exposure, which a large number of people is facing. Current guidelines are not meeting the requirements for such a large public who is being exposed to airborne ultrasound. These guidelines are roughly collected on the basis of small groups’ mainly male adults.

Over a period of time, many workers are being exposed to occupational industrial ultrasound through industrial devices for cleaning and drilling which affects them negatively.

It’s very much necessary that suffers can able to identify whether they are suffering from  VHF/US exposure or not. The lack of research states that it is not possible to prove or disprove the health risk of public.(IANS)(Image-huffingtonpost)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2016 NewsGram

Next Story

Kenya’s First Breast Milk Bank to Combat Newborn Mortality

There are misconceptions and concerns about hygiene and the spread of disease to newborns in the use of donated milk. Murage noted that all donors' health would checked at the hospital and that the milk would be pasteurized.

0
Kenya, newborn Mortality
A lab technician at the Mothers' Milk Bank of New England in Newtonville, Mass., pours donated breast milk into another flask to prepare for pasteurization. Kenya will soon be getting Africa's second bank for donated breast milk. VOA

Joshua Okumu’s wife, Mary Mwanja, died during childbirth 18 years ago at Pumwani Maternity Hospital in Nairobi. But their daughter survived.

When he picked up his newborn baby at the nursery, grief-stricken and shocked, Okumu was not entirely sure how to feed her.

Kenya, newborn Mortality
Plans are underway to bring a human milk bank to Nairobi as a joint effort between the Kenya Ministry of Health and PATH. The bank will be housed in Pumwani Maternity Hospital. VOA

“So when I reached home, I started feeding her with a packet of milk called Tuzo,” he said. “By that time, Tuzo was not diluted like nowadays. So, that is what I was using to feed the small baby when I took her from the hospital. If the mum was there it would have been healthier to be fed by her mum.”

For Kenyan widowers like Okumu, there will soon be another option: human donor milk.

Pumwani is getting Kenya’s first breast milk bank, which will be only the second of its kind on the continent. The other one is in South Africa.

The bank is a joint initiative by Kenya’s Ministry of Health and PATH, a U.S.-based nonprofit health organization. It will open in September for donations and offer free breast milk by prescription for babies who cannot get it from their mothers.

Newborn Mortality in kenya
Dr. Elizabeth Kimani Murage, head of maternal and child well-being at the African Population and Health Research Center. VOA

‘Next best option’

Dr. Elizabeth Kimani Murage, head of maternal and child well-being at the African Population and Health Research Center, is behind the project.

“The World Health Organization recommends that if the mother’s own breast milk is not available for the baby for any reason, the best next option would be the donor milk,” she said. “So the recommendation is to make donor milk available to such vulnerable babies.”

The milk bank aims to help orphaned and malnourished babies get the nutrients essential to healthy development.

Murage said mother’s milk has an enormous impact on child survival, especially during the first month of life.

Kenya, newborn Mortality
The Pumwani Maternity Hospital’s policy on breastfeeding is displayed on this bronze plate. VOA

“Despite improvements in infant mortality, neonatal mortality is reducing at a very slow rate, so those are the children we want to target,” she said. “According to the Every Newborn Action Plan [from the World Health Organization and UNICEF], we should actually reduce neonatal mortality to 12 deaths per 1,000 live births. But, you see, we are very far [from that goal]. We are at 22.”

There are misconceptions and concerns about hygiene and the spread of disease to newborns in the use of donated milk. Murage noted that all donors’ health would checked at the hospital and that the milk would be pasteurized to ensure that only safe and healthful breast milk is given to babies in need. (VOA)