Thursday March 21, 2019
Home Politics Facebook CEO ...

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg praises Narendra Modi for connecting with masses via Facebook

To classify the objectionable content, the Menlo Park-based company will use artificial intelligence and it wants to start with the cases in 2017

0
//
A museum will come up in Chanakyapuri to ceebrate Indian diaspora
India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi celebrating Indian diversity via museum. VOA

New York, Feb 17, 2017: As India conducts assembly elections in five states, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has applauded Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s style of working using the social networking platform to establish a meaningful dialogue between the people and the government.

Modi recently asked his ministers to share their meetings and information on Facebook so that they can receive direct feedback from citizens, the Facebook CEO wrote in a 5,700-worded post on its “Community Standard” Page.

Zuckerberg hailed the use of social media in election campaigning and gave the examples of countries like India, the US, Kenya and Indonesia where leaders were active on social platforms and connected well with the people.

“In recent campaigns around the world — from India and Indonesia across Europe to the United States — we’ve seen that the candidate with the largest and most engaged following on Facebook usually wins. Just as TV became the primary medium for civic communication in the 1960s, social media is becoming this in the 21st century,” he wrote.

NewsGram brings to you latest new stories in India.

“We can help establish direct dialogue and accountability between people and our elected leaders,” Zuckerberg added.

He said the use of social platforms created an opportunity for people to connect with their representatives at all levels.

“In the last few months, we have already helped our community double the number of connections between people and our representatives by making it easier to connect with all our representatives in one click,” Zuckerberg noted.

At the same time, he said, Facebook wanted its users to define what is “objectionable”, eventually empowering them to decide how much nudity and violence they are comfortable seeing.

“The idea is to give everyone in the community options for how they would like to set the content policy for themselves,” Zuckerberg wrote.

“Where is your line on nudity? On violence? On graphic content? On profanity? What you decide will be your personal settings. We will periodically ask you these questions to increase participation and so you don’t need to dig around to find them,” he asked.

Check out NewsGram for latest international news updates.

The letter also noted that for those who do not make a decision, the policies decided by majority of people in their region would be enforced.

To classify the objectionable content, the Menlo Park-based company will use artificial intelligence and it wants to start with the cases in 2017. (IANS)

Next Story

Despite All The Efforts, Political Campaign Spends on Social Media Remain A Mystery

But even as the Election Commission has made social media companies follow certain norms, such as pre-certification of political ads to prevent misuse of the platforms, such measures are unlikely to bring adequate transparency to the whole process

0
social media
The Election Commission is in talks with the representatives of Internet companies, including social media platforms, on the use of social media for campaigning in the Lok Sabha polls while the Model Code of Conduct is in force. Pixabay

Despite all the efforts put in place by social media companies to show who is paying for the political advertisements on their platforms, the users may not know the actual amount spent to run political campaigns on these websites.

Facebook has a searchable database for political ads which anyone can access. This Ad Library report from the social media giant shows that Indians have spent over Rs 6.5 crore in over 30,000 ads related to politics since February 2019 — in the run up to the general elections.

Similarly, Twitter also has an Ad Transparency Centre which allows one to search which account has spent how much in the past seven days.

social media
“In terms of political ads, social media companies should allow only certified agencies to post ads. This would make the monitoring process much easier for everyone. Allowing any individual to post political ads complicates the monitoring process. This is a big loophole,” he said. Pixabay

While these efforts are being regarded as important steps towards bringing transparency in the political process, they may not reflect the complete picture of how the social media space operates, according to experts.

“Influencers play a very important role in political campaigns and 90 per cent of the transactions related to these campaigns are done through cash,” social media expert Anoop Mishra told IANS.

Knowing which party is spending how much on social media is important because much of what trends on Twitter or what becomes popular on Facebook – with potential to impact voter behaviour – may actually be due to the money and manpower of political parties while creating an illusion of organic support from hundreds and thousands of users in these platforms.

“Every political party including the BJP (Bharatiya Janata Party), Congress, Samajwadi Party and BSP (Bahujan Samaj Party) are trying to push their agenda on social media. But those parties with greater money, manpower and tech expertise are likely to win the social media war,” Mishra said.

He added that political parties were employing a large number of people to make their propaganda material viral on social media.

twitter
Similarly, Twitter also has an Ad Transparency Centre which allows one to search which account has spent how much in the past seven days.
Pixabay

“In terms of political ads, social media companies should allow only certified agencies to post ads. This would make the monitoring process much easier for everyone. Allowing any individual to post political ads complicates the monitoring process. This is a big loophole,” he said.

“Encrypted platforms like WhatsApp could be used extensively to spread advertisements and propaganda, which could be difficult to be tracked,” added Prasanth Sugathan, Legal Director, Software Freedom Law Centre (SFLC.in), a Delhi-based not-for-profit legal services body.

Also Read: Report Claims, As Many As 1 Billion Indians Live in Areas of Water Scarcity
The Election Commission is in talks with the representatives of Internet companies, including social media platforms, on the use of social media for campaigning in the Lok Sabha polls while the Model Code of Conduct is in force.

But even as the Election Commission has made social media companies follow certain norms, such as pre-certification of political ads to prevent misuse of the platforms, such measures are unlikely to bring adequate transparency to the whole process. (IANS)