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Fake climate change ads question corporate takeover of Paris talks

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source: streetartnews.net

In the days leading up to the UN COP21 Climate Conference in Paris, at the time of the French state of emergency after the Paris terror attacks, several bus stops around the city received a facelift with advertisements concerning climate change.

At first sight, the 600 large-scale posters secured behind glass look like regular commercial advertisements. But looking deeper, one can see how the seemingly innocent ads, featuring airline and automobile companies among others, speak about something very grim.

The fake corporate ads, which were designed by 82 artists from 19 countries, were a satirical protest against the corporate takeover of the climate talks at the Paris Summit.

The ads, which are a part of the Brandalism project, draw links between various companies and their contribution to issues of global warming, consumerism, and consumption of fossil fuel.

Dow Chemicals, Air France, GDF Suez (Engie), and some other corporate sponsors of the Paris Summit was referenced in the posters.

“By sponsoring the climate talks, major polluters such as Air France and GDF-Suez-Engie can promote themselves as part of the solution – when actually they are part of the problem,” said Brandalism’s Joe Elan.

The Photoshopped images are very similar to the original advertisements of the brands and thus, the difference can be easily missed. But it is this subtle difference, which when noticed, creates a bigger impact on the audience and makes them take a deeper look into the content and the issue.

Among the artists who contributed to this project are Jimmy Cauty, Neta Harari, Escif, Kennard Phillips, and Bansky-collaborator Paul Insect.

Visit Brandalism and Street Art News for more photos of the 600 posters challenging the UN COP21 Climate Conference.

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Listen04_4 Revolt_Design_1Millo_z7Barnbrook_17_WEB(Photos from streetartnews.net)

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Mourners Gather in Iceland to Commemorate the Loss of the Glacier Okjokull

Iceland glacier commemorated with plaque

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Ok is the first Icelandic glacier to lose its status as glacier. Pixabay

Mourners will gather in Iceland on Sunday to commemorate the loss of the glacier Okjokull, which was officially declared dead in 2014 at the age of 700. The glacier was officially declared dead when it was no longer thick enough to move. What once was glacier has been reduced to a small patch of ice atop a volcano, the BBC reported.

Prime Minister Katrin Jakobsdottir, Environment Minister Gudmundur Ingi Gudbrandsson and former Irish President Mary Robinson will all take part in a commemoration ceremony later in the day. After opening remarks by Jakobsdottir at the ceremony, mourners will walk up the volcano northeast of the capital Reykjavik to lay a plaque which carries a letter to the future.

“Ok is the first Icelandic glacier to lose its status as glacier,” it reads. “In the next 200 years all our main glaciers are expected to follow the same path. This monument is to acknowledge that we know what is happening and what needs to be done. “Only you know if we did it.”

The dedication, written by Icelandic author Andri Snaer Magnason, ends with the date of the ceremony and the concentration of carbon dioxide in the air globally – 415 parts per million (ppm). “This is a big symbolic moment,” Magnason told the BBC on Saturday.

“Climate change doesn’t have a beginning or end and I think the philosophy behind this plaque is to place this warning sign to remind ourselves that historical events are happening, and we should not normalise them. We should put our feet down and say, okay, this is gone, this is significant.”

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Irish President Mary Robinson will all take part in a commemoration ceremony later in the day. Pixabay

Oddur Sigurdsson, the glaciologist at the Icelandic Meteorological Office who pronounced Okjokull’s death in 2014, has been taking photographs of the country’s glaciers for the past 50 years, and noticed in 2003 that snow was melting before it could accumulate on Okjokull. Glaciers have great cultural significance in Iceland and beyond.

Also Read: Can Huawei’s HarmonyOS be Successful Outside China?

Snaefellsjokull, a glacier-capped volcano in the west of the country, is where characters in Jules Verne’s science fiction novel “Journey to the Centre of the Earth” found a passage to the core of the planet. That glacier is now also receding. (IANS)