Friday February 22, 2019
Home Uncategorized Fake climate ...

Fake climate change ads question corporate takeover of Paris talks

0
//
source: streetartnews.net

In the days leading up to the UN COP21 Climate Conference in Paris, at the time of the French state of emergency after the Paris terror attacks, several bus stops around the city received a facelift with advertisements concerning climate change.

At first sight, the 600 large-scale posters secured behind glass look like regular commercial advertisements. But looking deeper, one can see how the seemingly innocent ads, featuring airline and automobile companies among others, speak about something very grim.

The fake corporate ads, which were designed by 82 artists from 19 countries, were a satirical protest against the corporate takeover of the climate talks at the Paris Summit.

The ads, which are a part of the Brandalism project, draw links between various companies and their contribution to issues of global warming, consumerism, and consumption of fossil fuel.

Dow Chemicals, Air France, GDF Suez (Engie), and some other corporate sponsors of the Paris Summit was referenced in the posters.

“By sponsoring the climate talks, major polluters such as Air France and GDF-Suez-Engie can promote themselves as part of the solution – when actually they are part of the problem,” said Brandalism’s Joe Elan.

The Photoshopped images are very similar to the original advertisements of the brands and thus, the difference can be easily missed. But it is this subtle difference, which when noticed, creates a bigger impact on the audience and makes them take a deeper look into the content and the issue.

Among the artists who contributed to this project are Jimmy Cauty, Neta Harari, Escif, Kennard Phillips, and Bansky-collaborator Paul Insect.

Visit Brandalism and Street Art News for more photos of the 600 posters challenging the UN COP21 Climate Conference.

Barnbrook_mobil_z7_2_WEB Barnbrook_VW_z1_3_WEB

Listen04_4 Revolt_Design_1Millo_z7Barnbrook_17_WEB(Photos from streetartnews.net)

Next Story

Americans ‘Alarmed’ by Climate Change Double in Just 5 Years

Twenty-nine percent of respondents to the poll conducted last December by Yale and George Mason universities.

0
Paris Climate Meet, Global Warming
A woman displays a placard during a demonstration in New York on June 1, 2017, to protest U.S. President Donald Trump's decision to pull out of the 195-nation Paris climate accord deal. VOA

The proportion of Americans found to be “alarmed” by climate change has doubled in just five years, the pollsters behind a nationwide survey revealed on Tuesday.

Twenty-nine percent of respondents to the poll conducted last December by Yale and George Mason universities were in the alarmed category — an all-time high — and twice the percentage of those surveyed in 2013.

More than 1,100 adults across the United States were asked about their beliefs, attitudes and behaviors toward climate change.

The answers were then used to classify respondents into six groups, from dismissive, or least worried about climate change, to alarmed, for those most worried.

US, New York
FILE – People cool off at the Unisphere in Queens, New York, July 2, 2018. VOA

Those deemed dismissive of global warming represented 9 percent of respondents, a drop of five points compared to 2013.

‘Green New Deal’

The findings come amid a growing polarization of the political debate over the issue of global warming in the United States.

The decision by U.S. President Donald Trump to pull out of the Paris climate deal has fired up his base, while opponents have championed a “Green New Deal” that seeks to eliminate the nation’s heat-trapping greenhouse gas emissions within a decade.

The 2015 Paris accord, agreed by nearly 200 nations, seeks to wean the global economy off fossil fuels in the second half of this century, limiting the rise in average temperatures to “well below” 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 Fahrenheit) above pre-industrial times.

The increased visibility of global warming such debates generate could explain Americans’ rising concern, said Kenneth Sherrill, a political science professor emeritus at Hunter College in New York City.

New York, Climate
The climate in New York City in 60 years could feel like Arkansas now. Pixabay

“The more information you get there more interested that you are,” he said.

Academic research has further shown that growing exposure to bouts of extreme weather may also change minds, he added. “And it results in higher concern.”

Climate change influences economy

Climate change will cost the U.S. economy hundreds of billions of dollars by the end of the century, hitting everything from health to infrastructure, according to a 2018 government report, the Fourth National Climate Assessment Volume II.

ALSO READ: Global Warming Could Change US Cities’ Climate by 2080- Study

Meanwhile, three of the five costliest hurricanes in the United States — Harvey, Maria and Irma — occurred in 2017, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, part of the U.S. Commerce Department. (VOA)