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Families Live on Trees due to the Terror of rampaging Elephants in Jharkhand

The number of elephants in the state has increased from 624 in 2007 to 688 in 2012

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Herd of elephants. Pixabay

Ranchi, Nov 30, 2016: At least four families have been forced to live on trees because of the terror of rampaging elephants near Ranchi, the capital city in Jharkhand.

A herd of elephants has created fear among the people living in villages near Ranchi as well as those travelling along the Ranchi- Jamshedpur National Highway.

The highway remains deserted for hours due to the fear of the wandering elephants.

Some families living in Loharatola village in Bundu, around 45 km from Ranchi, have made makeshift perches on trees. They sleep on trees to protect themselves from elephants.

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A herd of elephants damaged their houses last year. The families left their village and have been living through fields as they have agricultural land.

“During the daytime, we are involved in farming activities. The children collect small pieces of bricks for pelting at the elephants,” said Janki Munda, head of a family which lives on trees.

There are more than 15 families in the village and all depend on farming for their livelihood.

The village lacks basic facilities, exposing the tall claims made by the state government about development work in Jharkhand.

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“We are left to fend ourselves. We eke out living by cultivating our farms. We have no other option for making our living. We live in the fear of elephants and have made makeshift shelters on trees,” said Parikshit Lohra.

Jharkhand has been witnessing large-scale devastation by rampaging elephants.

Herds of elephants damage standing crops, houses and kill people. More than 1,000 people have been killed by elephants in Jharkhand since the state was carved out of Bihar in November 2000.

The number of elephants in the state has increased from 624 in 2007 to 688 in 2012.

At least 154 elephants have lost their lives in the state for various reasons, including electrocution, being run over by trains and because they consumed poisonous substances.

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According to experts, human habitats developed on the elephant corridor have been causing conflict.

“We will immediately send a team of senior officials and all possible help will be extended to the families living on trees,” Sukhdeo Singh, Jharkhand Forest and Environment Secretary, told IANS.

“We are working on short- and long-term plans to minimise the conflict between humans and elephants,” he added. (IANS)

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Sanitization to Fight Coronavius Begins in UP

Massive sanitization drive begins in UP

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A massive sanitization drive began in major cities in Uttar Pradesh on Friday. (Representation Image). Pixabay

A massive sanitization drive began in major cities in Uttar Pradesh on Friday. This is the latest news in India.

Rajkumar Vishwakarma, DG, fire services, told reporters that sanitization was being done with sodium hypochlorite and fire personnel had been instructed to take care and not to spray the disinfectant on human beings and animals.

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The sanitization will be done using sodium hypochlorite. (Representational Image). Pixabay

Spraying will also not be done inside any building due to electrical connections.

Fire personnel have been asked to take photographs and post it on WhatsApp media groups. They have been asked to avoid calling the media personnel to the sanitisation sites to avoid risks.

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Earlier this week, about 50 migrant workers who were at a bus station in Bareilly, were sprayed with sodium hypochlorite by the sanitisation staff. Those who were sprayed, including children, complained of itching in the eyes and rashes on the body.

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Chief minister Yogi Adityanath had expressed his concern over the incident and assured action against the guilty.

District magistrate Bareilly, Nitish Kumar said that the incident happened due to ‘over-zealous’ workers. (IANS)

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People Have Faith in Modi Government to Handle COVID-19 Crisis

Over 83% trust Modi govt will handle COVID-19 crisis well

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Modi government
The Narendra Modi-led central government is leaving no stone unturned in fight against the novel coronavirus pandemic. Wikimedia Commons

As the Narendra Modi-led central government is leaving no stone unturned in fight against the novel coronavirus pandemic, 83.5 per cent people from various states “trust in government” in handling the crisis.

The findings came out in the IANS-CVoter exclusive tracker on COVID-19 Wave 2 survey conducted during last seven days among 18 plus adults nationwide. The findings and projections are based on Computer-Assisted Telephone Interviewing (CATI).

Replying to a question “I think Indian government is handling the coronavirus well”, 83.5 per cent people agreed that they trust in government’s steps being taken in fight against the deadly disease, and 9.4 per cent expressed their disagreement. The survey was conducted on March 26 and 27. Of the 83.5 per cent who showed their trust in government, 66.4 per cent strongly agree with the opinion and 17.1 agree with the view.

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A similar survey on the same question done on March 17 and 18 showed that 83.6 per cent people expressed their trust in government in fight against the pandemic which so far has claimed 29 lives and over 1,000 conformed cases. A total of 13.7 per cent people expressed their disagreement.

Modi government
83.5 per cent people from various states trust the Modi government in handling the COVID-19 crisis. Wikimedia Commons

As per the tracker, the data is weighted to the known demographic profile of the states. Sometimes the table figures do not sum to 100 due to the effects of rounding, it says. “Our final data file has socio-economic profile within plus 1 per cent of the demographic profile of the state. We believe this will give the closest possible trends.”

The Tracking Pol fieldwork covers random probability samples during the last seven days from the release date and that the sample spread is across all assembly segments across all states. This survey covers all states in India and was conducted in 10 languages as part of our routine OmniBus, it says.

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“This is a thorough random probability sample; and we are ensuring a proper representative analysis by statistical weighing of the data to make it representative of the local population as per the latest census and or other available demographic benchmarks.”

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The data clarified that it strictly follows the WAPOR code of conduct (World Association of Public Opinion Research) for our ethical and transparent scientific practices and have incorporated the PCI (Press Council of India ) guidelines as our SOP (Standard Operating Procedures). (IANS)

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Team Lioness Aims to Fight Poachers in Amboseli National Park in Kenya

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Team Lioness
Members of Team Lioness are members are seen in traditional garb on a day off from work. (Courtesy - Patrick Papatiti, Commander of the Olgululului Community. VOA

By Lenny Ruvaga

Kenya’s Amboseli National Park is home to herds of elephants that have been the target of poachers trafficking in the illicit trade in ivory. Now a program that has brought women on board in the fight against poaching is gaining traction.

At the start of another day at the Olgulului-Ololarashi Group Ranch, 23-year-old park ranger Purity Amleset, the leader of this all female ranger unit, sets out the day’s plan with her team, ensuring that each member has her orders correct.

Today’s task: locating an elephant and her newborn calf.

Team Lioness

Dubbed “Team Lioness,” the ranger unit is made up of eight women whose core duties involve protecting wildlife within the 1,230 square kilometer stretch of parkland that surrounds Amboseli National Park.

They are chosen for their academic achievements, physical stamina, integrity and discipline.

Amleset says joining an all-female ranger unit has been beneficial to the traditionally patriarchal Maasai community.

She says her community held the view that women and girls were the weaker sex and that girls could only do menial jobs and housework, which included only raising a family. However over the course of time, the female rangers have been showing and telling them the importance of being a ranger just like the menfolk.

Team Lioness
Female rangers of the TeamL Lioness at the Olgulului-Ololarashi Group Ranch pose for a group photo with their male colleagues. VOA

Gateway for poachers

The Olgulului-Ololarashi Group Ranch’s proximity to the Amboseli park makes it a likely gateway for poachers who may seek entry into the national park to hunt illegally.

Patrick Papatiti, the commander of the Olgululului Community Wildlife Rangers has about 76 rangers under his charge. He says integrating women has not been easy.

“We have the same mentality even within the male ranger unit, the same mentality that ladies cannot do it. But surprisingly we have the best young women who can run, who can move faster than these guys, who can go long(er) distances than these guys,” he sad. “So from that, working together helped us to clear the norm that these are the same ladies the same girls that you see in the village.”

Despite the challenges, in the end James Isiche — the regional director for East Africa from the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) — says starting an all-female ranger unit was a risk worth taking.

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“Communities in Kenya are male-dominated, but this particular one is extremely male-dominated,” he said. “So getting young ladies to engage in what is seen as a man’s job is a huge success and what we (are) seeing is that it’s encouraging other girls to step up and say that ‘when I finish school I also want to join the female lionesses.’” (VOA)