Sunday February 17, 2019
Home Politics Fee Hike not ...

Fee Hike not to frustrate small political parties, says Ghana Electoral Commission ahead of Polls

The Electoral commission also set September 29 and 30 as the dates for the candidates to officially present their nomination papers

0
//
A sign for Ghana's Electoral Commission is seen at a voting station in Accra during a previous poll. Source:VOA
  • Ghana’s Electoral Commission announced the fees for the nominees for the presidential and parliamentary candidates, i.e., $12,505 and $2,501 respectively
  • The announcement was made following a stakeholder’s meeting with the Interparty Advisory Committee in Accra
  • The Supreme Court of Ghana ordered the Electoral commission to delete the names of the registered voters who used their National Health Insurance Scheme card as an identification for registering

GHANA, Sept 14, 2016: The Electoral Commission of Ghana has sharply denied accusations that its newly released nomination fees for candidates are exorbitant and intended to frustrate smaller political parties.

Ghanaian electoral laws allow the commission to determine nomination fees for presidential and parliamentary candidates ahead of polls. Presidential candidates will be required to pay $12,505 and parliamentary candidates will pay $2,501 for the December 7 elections, the commission said.

Follow Newsgram on Twitter

Spokesman Eric Dzakpasu said the commission made the announcement following a stakeholders meeting Thursday with the Interparty Advisory Committee in Accra.

“This is a decision taken by the commission at the very highest level, and I would say that it is not ‘elimination by rough tactics,’ as they put it. These are fees which have been informed by a lot of considerations. The law also makes a room that these are not fees that can be kept by the commission at all because they are refundable fees” for candidates who reach a specified level of support, Dzakpasu said.

“If you are a presidential candidate, by regulation, if at the end of the election you are able to get 29 percent of the votes cast in the election, your money is refunded to you,” he said. “If you are a parliamentary candidate if you are able to get 12.5 percent of the votes in your constituency, your money is refunded to you.”

Current Composition of the Parliament of Ghana. Source: VOA
Current Composition of the Parliament of Ghana. Source: VOA

Nomination papers

The commission also set September 29 and 30 as the dates for the candidates to officially present their nomination papers, which will allow them to qualify for ballot placement. Presidential candidates will need two signatures from each of the country’s more than 250 administrative districts, while the parliamentary candidates are required to have 20 signatories from their respective constituencies.

Meanwhile, an exhibition of the list of those who used the National Health Insurance Scheme card as identification during voter registration ends Saturday.

Follow Newsgram on Facebook

Supreme Court judges recently ruled that the electoral commission should delete from the register names of those who used the NHIS cards. The commission then deleted the names and re-registered about 29,000 people.

Those who have been re-registered are required to check their information as captured during the process. This, the electoral commission said, forms part of its efforts to compile a credible voter list to be used for the December elections. (VOA)

Next Story

Nigerian Women’s Struggle To Become The Country’s First Female President

The move shocked supporters, like Raymond Chinedu, who saw her as a symbol of new hope for gender equality.

0
Africa
Former Nigerian minister and Chibok girls activist Obiageli Ezekwesili speaks during an interview with Reuters in Abuja, Nigeria, Oct. 8, 2018. Ezekwesili dropped her presidential bid to support a coalition against the main parties. VOA

When Nigerians go to the polls Feb. 16 for general elections, few will be expecting large numbers of female candidates to win.

The share of women in Nigeria’s government in the last three years has fallen to 6 percent, and the top female presidential candidate, Oby Ezekwesili, has withdrawn from the race.

Ezekwesili, a Nigerian technocrat, was aiming to change Nigeria’s political landscape by running to become the country’s first female president.

But she pulled out of the race three weeks before the Feb. 16 vote to support a coalition against the main parties.

Supporters dismayed

The move shocked supporters, like Raymond Chinedu, who saw her as a symbol of new hope for gender equality.

“In Nigeria it is difficult to support a woman to that level, so that’s where the disappointment comes in. But we believe if the men have failed all this while, it is our mindset that at least having a woman in the system, running the system, we believe that things would have taken a different shape,” Chinedu said.

Ezekwesili co-founded the Bring Back Our Girls campaign in 2014 and openly marched against the government after Boko Haram terrorists abducted hundreds of schoolgirls
Ezekwesili co-founded the Bring Back Our Girls campaign in 2014 and openly marched against the government after Boko Haram terrorists abducted hundreds of schoolgirls .VOA

Nigeria’s Independent National Electoral Commission says women occupy only 6 percent of political offices, and he blames cultural and religious factors for the shortage of women in politics.

“… Rwanda even has a higher percentage,” said Oluwole Osaze, the commission’s director. “Part of it is probably because of affirmative action because, in their laws, in their constitution they have things like that. We don’t have that.”

 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z0c7fS9ND10

Name on the ballot

Ezekwesili co-founded the Bring Back Our Girls campaign in 2014 and openly marched against the government after Boko Haram terrorists abducted hundreds of schoolgirls.

The former education minister is also a co-creator of the anti-corruption agency, Transparency International. It’s a notable record in a country known for widespread corruption.

Also Read: WHO Calls for Accelerated Action To Eliminate Cervical Cancer

“Politics undermines everything that we do in this country, whether it is what citizens do, what businesses do, what the society at large does. it undermines governance,” Ezekwesili said.

Nigeria’s election commission said it was too late for Ezekwesili to withdraw from the presidential race and is likely to publish her name on the ballot.

This could split some of the opposition vote, and it’s unlikely Ezekwesili will even remain the top female candidate for president. (VOA)