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Female Scribes face Patriarchy and Misogyny in India, say Women Journalists

"We want to be judged on the basis of our work, stories not just on the basis of being female reporters," Barkha Dutt

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Gender Equality (representational Image). Pixabay

October 6, 2016: Women journalists, like men, should be judged on the basis of their stories rather than their gender in the male-dominated world of journalism where they face “misogyny and patriarchy” on daily basis, renowned Indian scribes said here on Thursday.

“We want to be judged on the basis of our work, stories not just on the basis of being female reporters,” Barkha Dutt, consulting editor of NDTV, said here at a discussion on “The female journalist in India”.

Barkha Dutt, Wikimedia
Barkha Dutt, Wikimedia

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Veteran journalists, including Suhasini Haider of The Hindu and Harinder Baweja of Hindustan Times, were also part of the discussion at the American Center to commemorate the life and work of American-Israeli Daniel Pearl, a Wall Street Journal reporter who was kidnapped and later killed by militants in Pakistan.

The women journalists spoke about their lives as young reporters, covering conflicts and facing harassment and being the target of humiliating and hateful tweets but still standing out in the male-dominated profession.

“I stayed quiet as a younger person when I was harassed during work. Because, I did not want to lose the story,” said Dutt, who shot to fame after her live coverage of the 1999 Kargil conflict between India and Pakistan.

Harinder Baweja, Twitter
Harinder Baweja, Twitter

“I had to argue with the army for allowing me to go to Kargil during the war and their reason for not letting me go was there are no bathrooms,” she said.

“I told them, I would go the way men out there would do.”

Baweja, known for her investigative reporting, echoed the lines. “As a female, we all have faced difficulties. But to all young reporters, I would advise to have a thicker skin and move on. Although things now are changing.”

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Speaking to journalists, students and diplomats, the panellists highlighted the social media abuse that women journalists go through.

“This is where it is different with men. Male journalists do not undergo sexual abuse online whereas we all face it every day,” Baweja said.

They said “misogyny, institutional patriarchy, and fictionalising of personal lives” by the society was not what their male counterparts would face.

US envoy Richard Verma and Israel’s envoy Daniel Carmon were also present at the event.(IANS)

 

  • Enakshi Roy Chowdhury

    Female journalists should get the same kind of behaviour and feel equally safe as their male collegues

  • Aakash Mandyal

    Time has come where all this gender discrimination will not work. We are living in a that country whose x-president was female. Need to change our vision then only we can grow.

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Aadhaar Helpline Mystery: French Security Expert Tweets of doing a Full Disclosure Tomorrow about Code of the Google SetUP Wizard App

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cryptocurrency. google
Google comes up with a new feature

Google’s admission that it had in 2014 inadvertently coded the 112 distress number and the UIDAI helpline number into its setup wizard for Android devices triggered another controversy on Saturday as India’s telecom regulator had only recommended the use of 112 as an emergency number in April 2015.

After a large section of smartphone users in India saw a toll-free helpline number of UIDAI saved in their phone-books by default, Google issued a statement, saying its “internal review revealed that in 2014, the then UIDAI helpline number and the 112 distress helpline number were inadvertently coded into the SetUp wizard of the Android release given to OEMs for use in India and has remained there since”.

Aadhaar Helpline Number Mystery: French security expert tweets of doing a full disclosure tomorrow about Code of the Google SetUP Wizard App, Image: Wikimedia Commons.

However, the Telecom Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI) recommended only in April 2015 that the number 112 be adopted as the single emergency number for the country.

According to Google, “since the numbers get listed on a user’s contact list, these get  transferred accordingly to the contacts on any new device”.

Google was yet to comment on the new development.

Meanwhile, French security expert that goes by the name of Elliot Alderson and has been at the core of the entire Aadhaar controversy, tweeted on Saturday: “I just found something interesting. I will probably do full disclosure tomorrow”.

“I’m digging into the code of the @Google SetupWizard app and I found that”.

“As far as I can see this object is not used in the current code, so there is no implications. This is just a poor coding practice in term of security,” he further tweeted.

On Friday, both the Unique Identification Authority of India (UIDAI) as well as the telecom operators washed their hand of the issue.

While the telecom industry denied any role in the strange incident, the UIDAI said that he strange incident, the UIDAI said that some vested interests were trying to create “unwarranted confusion” in the public and clarified that it had not asked any manufacturer or telecom service provider to provide any such facility.

Twitter was abuzz with the new development after a huge uproar due to Telecom Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI) Chairman R.S. Sharma’s open Aadhaar challenge to critics and hackers.

Ethical hackers exposed at least 14 personal details of the TRAI Chairman, including mobile numbers, home address, date of birth, PAN number and voter ID among others. (IANS)

Also Read: Why India Is Still Nowhere Near Securing Its Citizens’ Data?