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Fifth Dharamshala International Film Festival (DIFF) likely to be held in November at McLeodganj

DIFF's Children's Film Programme is curated by children's media specialist Monica Wahi, who selected the films last year as well

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Cloudy Triund, above Mcleod Ganj, Himachal Pradesh. Wikimedia
  • This year, DIFF unveils a new look designed by Wieden+Kennedy Delhi, who have come on board as the Creative Partners for the festival
  • Filmmakers Umesh Kulkarni and Anupama Srinivasan will mentor the fellows
  • Hemant Sreekumar, Director of Experience said, DIFF’s new logotype was evolved out of the linear aspects of Buddhist art

Dharamsala, Sep 14 : The fifth Dharamshala International Film Festival (DIFF) will be held from November 3-6 at McLeodganj, Dharamsala.

DIFF is presented by White Crane Arts and Media, a trust founded by veteran filmmakers Ritu Sarin and Tenzing Sonam to promote contemporary cinema, art and independent media practices in the Himalayan region of India.

“This is our fifth year and it means a great deal to us to have reached this milestone,” Sarin said in a statement.

“DIFF has surpassed all our expectations; from starting out as a small event in a town with no cinemas to becoming a truly international festival, with filmmakers, guests and audiences looking forward to coming to here each year from all over the world,” Sarin added.

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Sonam said they hope to continue building on the qualities for which DIFF has become known — showcasing a selection of indie films from India and around the globe, encouraging discussion between filmmakers and film lovers in an intimate yet casual atmosphere.

“At the same time, a priority this year is to expand its outreach to local communities, schools, and colleges,” Sonam added.

DIFF Poster. diff.co.in
DIFF Poster. diff.co.in

This year, DIFF unveils a new look designed by Wieden+Kennedy Delhi, an advertising agency, who have come on board as the Creative Partners for the festival.

Hemant Sreekumar, Director of Experience, explained: “DIFF’s new logotype was evolved out of the linear aspects of Buddhist art, whereas the colour thematic was inspired by the artist Nicholas Roerich’s ethereal Himalayan hues.”

For the fourth year in a row, the shorts selection has been curated by filmmaker Umesh Kulkarni, who has been a DIFF participant and supporter from the first edition.

DIFF’s Children’s Film Programme is curated by children’s media specialist Monica Wahi, who selected the films last year as well.

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DIFF will also present a selection of videos from the collection of its long-term collaborator, Thyssen-Bornemisza Art Contemporary.

DIFF has announced the first six films from this edition. These include: “A Syrian Love Story” by British director Sean McAllister; Rajeev Ravi’s third directorial venture “Kammatipaadam”; South Korean director Jeon Soo-il’s “A Korean in Paris”; Iranian director Rokhsareh Ghaem Maghami’s “Sonita”; Thailand’s director Pimpaka Towira’s “The Island Funeral”; and Marathi film “Lathe Joshi” by Mangesh Joshi.

The gala also continues its Film Fellows programme, which was first set up in 2014 to enable budding filmmakers from the Indian Himalayan region to attend the festival and participate in mentorship sessions with established filmmakers. Filmmakers Umesh Kulkarni and Anupama Srinivasan will mentor the fellows.

This year sees a change of venue from the Tibetan Institute of Performing Arts to the Tibetan Children’s Village. (IANS)

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‘Seva Truck’ Of Sikh-Americans Provide Free Food To Local Communities

Seva Truck is a fully licensed food truck with a commercially integrated kitchen

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Seva Truck sends out free food
Seva Truck Foundation is a non-profit organization dedicated to reducing hunger in our communities by serving hot, nutritious meals to anyone in need. (Representational Image). Pixabay

A Sikh-American from Washington D.C. is operating a ‘Seva Truck’, via which he sends out free meals to local communities in need including schools and social work organisations.

Washington D.C.-based Sonny Kakar bought an old FedEx truck, painted it orange and began operating his ‘Seva Truck’, the American Bazaar reported on Friday.

His initiative specially targets kids at risk in underserved communities. In just three years since its inception, the orange truck has not only become the pride of the area but has also expanded to feed over 20,000 people.

Showing his compassionate side, Kakar believed that there was need for such an initiative when he started it, but “we hope that ‘we are out of business’ in the future”.

Seva Truck Free meal food Truck
Through our Free Meal Service campaign, we serve nutritionally-balanced vegetarian meals when and wherever needed.(Representational Image). Pixabay

“We hope there won’t be a need for a Seva Truck because we hope that society reaches a stage where they do not think about serving themselves but serving the broader purpose.”

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In one of the schools where the truck has been regularly dropping off meals since last three years, the attendance has gone up by 30 per cent, Kakar said.

Encouraged by the success Kakar opened another location in Michigan and hopes to spread his initiative across the country. (IANS)