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Filmmaker Leena Yadav’s ‘Parched’ Trailer gives closer look at Rajasthani rural womanhood

"Parched" is less lyrical than other desert sagas in the past. More brutal. Yet beautiful

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A glimpse of Rajasthan folk dances (representational image), Wikimedia
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Mumbai, Sept 13, 2016: In Indian cinema, there is something furiously flawed and formulistic about rural feminism. When a film tells the story of a group of women in Rajasthan fighting to remain happy while the men in their lives rape and violate them every way possible, it’s time to get very suspicious of the product.

Luckily, in “Parched”, director Leena Yadav seems to have gone beyond the cliches of male oppression in pursuit of the heart beneath the predictable images of women caught moving seductively amidst the sand dunes.

Parched Director Leena Yadav Interview - TIFF 2015. Youtube
Parched Director Leena Yadav Interview – TIFF 2015. Youtube

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And here we might as well spare a round of applause for cinematographer Russen Carpenter who seems to have captured the lives of the four female heroes without letting the Rajasthani desert scape overpower the emotional energy that trots across the shimmering skyline.

But yes, we’ve seen forlorn seductive women floating across the sand dunes in any number of films. “Parched” is less lyrical than other desert sagas in the past. More brutal. Yet beautiful. The women seem to take to the patriarchal clobbering with a great deal of reluctance and a whole lot of sisterly camaraderie.

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If this film was made 20 years ago, Yadav would have cast Shabana Azmi, Smita Patil, Neena Gupta and Deepti Naval. Now, it’s got Tannishtha Chatterjee, Radhika Apte, Surveen Chawla and Lehar Khan.
https://twitter.com/ajaydevgn/status/775257888704962560

And yes, a voice appearance by producer Ajay Devgn at the end of the trailer.

In case, we forget superstars do have a social responsibility. (IANS)

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India’s First Woman Lawyer: 10 Lesser Known Facts About Cornelia Sorabji

She was the first female graduate of Bombay University to be admitted to the Allahabad High Court. In 1889, she became the first woman to read law at Oxford University, and also the first Indian to study at any British university

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Cornelia Sorabji, the first woman lawyer of India, was also the first Indian women to practice law in England. Wikimedia Commons
Cornelia Sorabji, the first woman lawyer of India, was also the first Indian women to practice law in England. Wikimedia Commons

Cornelia Sorabji was the first female graduate from Bombay University, as well as the first woman to study law at Oxford University. The first female advocate in India, also the first woman to practice law in India and Britain. A Google Doodle celebrated her 151st birthday on 15 November 2017.

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Here are 10 lesser known facts about Cornelia Sorabji you may not be known before: 

1. She was the first Indian national to attend a British University, but before that, she was also the first woman to graduate in law from India as early as 1892.

2. Cornelia was born in Nashik to a Parsi missionary in the erstwhile Bombay Presidency of colonial India on this day in 1866.

3. It was her parents who encouraged her to take higher studies. They were advocates of women’s education and also established several girls schools in Pune.

4. When Cornelia took up law at Oxford, it was a time when universities were reluctant to accept female students. The National Indian Association helped her. Though she completed her course in 1894, she didn’t receive a degree. Oxford University started awarding degrees to women only since 1922.

In 2012, a bust of her was unveiled at Lincoln's Inn, London. Wikimedia Commons
In 2012, a bust of her was unveiled at Lincoln’s Inn, London. Wikimedia Commons

5. After completion of her education, both India and England didn’t allow Cornelia to plead in courts. She returned to her homeland and became a legal advisor.

6. Cornelia supported the cause of purdahnashins and even succeeded in pursuing the government to appoint Lady Assistants to the courts to help women litigants.

7. To obtain a law degree, she appeared again for LLB examination at Bombay University. She became the first woman graduate from the institution. However, she wasn’t acknowledged as a barrister.

8. It was in 1923 that colonial courts opened their doors to women advocates. Next year, she began practising in Kolkata. 

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9. Six years later she retired and moved to London. She died on July 6, 1954.

10. India Calling: The memories of Cornelia Sorabji is her published autobiographies, while India Recalled is a biography of her parents.