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Filmmaker Prakash Dantuluri creates learning app for pre-school kids

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Preschooler Amni Roslan, 6, stays in class as he refuses to join his classmates for outdoor activities during his first day of school in Putrajaya, outside Kuala Lumpur January 2, 2013. REUTERS/Bazuki Muhammad (MALAYSIA - Tags: EDUCATION SOCIETY) - RTR3C1JB
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Chennai: Filmmaker and serial entrepreneur Prakash Dantuluri, known for Telugu films such as ‘Satyabhama’ and ‘Om Shanti’, has announced the launch of Tuk-Tuk in Mumbai, a kids-travel app for pre-school children.

The app is the latest addition to Dantuluri’s company Bulbul Applications, a fun-filled learning library developed with a vision to provide clean, ad-free content to children between six and nine years old.

According to him, Bulbul provides apps that are interactive and encourages child’s curiosity, reading and learning skills.

“As an artist, film maker and story teller myself, I view a story as a recipe of visuals, sound and effects. I wanted to create the big screen experience for children in their little hands with a repository of short, easy to install, learn and highly engaging content,” Dantuluri told IANS.

“To create this library we collaborated with writers, illustrators, sound effects professionals, background score experts, animations and voice-overs artists from around the world,” he added.

Announcing the details of the content currently available on Bulbul apps library, Prakash said: “Our immediate goal is to focus on known folk and fairy tales. In the next phase, our spotlight will be on native characters and regional content for India. Eventually, we want to replicate this model in many regions of the world”.

Bulbul is a library app and it has 8 categories that encompass folktales, princess stories, Indian mythology, Mowgli and Bulbul, Krishna series and English rhymes.

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Genetics May Play Big Role In Kid’s Snacking Patterns

The children with the genetic variant related to fat taste sensitivity were found to consume snacks with higher energy density

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The study, published in the journal Nutrients, entailed tracking the day-to-day diets of a group of pre-schoolers and found that one-third of the kids' diets were made up of snacks. Pixabay

Parents, take note! The types of snacks a child chooses could be linked to genetics, a new study has claimed.

The researcher investigated whether genetic variants in taste receptors related to sweet preference, fat taste sensitivity, and aversion to bitter green leafy vegetables influenced the snacks chosen by the study participants.

They found that nearly 80 percent of the study participants carried at least one of these potential at-risk genotypes that could predispose them to poor snacking habits.

ALSO READ: App to help scientists study cancer genetics

“Kids are eating a lot more snacks now than they used to, and we think to look at how genetics can be related to snacking behavior is important to understanding increased obesity among kids,” said Elie Chamoun from the University of Guelph in Ontario, Canada.

“This new research could help parents understand how their kids taste and tailor their diet for better nutritional choices,” Chamoun added.

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The researchers also tested the participants’ saliva to determine their genetic taste profile. Pixabay

ALSO READ: Scientists Use Pocket-size Device to Map Human Genetic Code

They discovered that kids with a sweet tooth, who have the gene related to sweet taste preference, ate snacks with significantly more calories from sugar. They also ate those snacks mostly in the evening.

“It’s likely these kids snacked more in the evening because that’s when they are at home and have more access to foods with high sugar,” said Chamoun.

The children with the genetic variant related to fat taste sensitivity were found to consume snacks with higher energy density. People with this genetic variant may have a low oral sensitivity to fat and therefore consume more fatty foods without sensing it, the researcher said. (IANS)

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