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Filmmaker Prakash Dantuluri creates learning app for pre-school kids

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Preschooler Amni Roslan, 6, stays in class as he refuses to join his classmates for outdoor activities during his first day of school in Putrajaya, outside Kuala Lumpur January 2, 2013. REUTERS/Bazuki Muhammad (MALAYSIA - Tags: EDUCATION SOCIETY) - RTR3C1JB
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Chennai: Filmmaker and serial entrepreneur Prakash Dantuluri, known for Telugu films such as ‘Satyabhama’ and ‘Om Shanti’, has announced the launch of Tuk-Tuk in Mumbai, a kids-travel app for pre-school children.

The app is the latest addition to Dantuluri’s company Bulbul Applications, a fun-filled learning library developed with a vision to provide clean, ad-free content to children between six and nine years old.

According to him, Bulbul provides apps that are interactive and encourages child’s curiosity, reading and learning skills.

“As an artist, film maker and story teller myself, I view a story as a recipe of visuals, sound and effects. I wanted to create the big screen experience for children in their little hands with a repository of short, easy to install, learn and highly engaging content,” Dantuluri told IANS.

“To create this library we collaborated with writers, illustrators, sound effects professionals, background score experts, animations and voice-overs artists from around the world,” he added.

Announcing the details of the content currently available on Bulbul apps library, Prakash said: “Our immediate goal is to focus on known folk and fairy tales. In the next phase, our spotlight will be on native characters and regional content for India. Eventually, we want to replicate this model in many regions of the world”.

Bulbul is a library app and it has 8 categories that encompass folktales, princess stories, Indian mythology, Mowgli and Bulbul, Krishna series and English rhymes.

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Marijuana Considered Safe to Cure Epilepsy in Kids

While the study's authors said the results were significant, they stressed that the purpose of this study was about safety not efficacy

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Marijuana
Marijuana safe to treat epilepsy in kids: Study. Pixabay

Consuming a marijuana-based drug may be safe in treating children with severe epilepsy, results of a clinical trial has showed.

Following treatment with cannabidiol — a non-psychoactive compound found in marijuana — about one in five children were described as much or very much improved from their baseline, while around half reported none, or a very slight improvement, Xinhua news agency reported.

While the trial was conducted on a small group of children with severe epilepsy, it showed that the drug had a manageable side effect profile, but only showed extensive symptom relief for a brief number of patients.

The trial “involved the sickest children with epilepsy — children who are having seizures many times per day, who have been recently hospitalized for their epilepsy, and have failed on average about nine anti-epilepsy drugs before,” said lead author John Lawson, paediatric neurologist at Sydney’s Children’s Hospital.

“The main aim of the study was about safety. We found that there were a few safety concerns but overall those safety issues were very manageable and the drug overall was very safe for the majority,” he added.

Marijuana
Marijuana leaves. Pixabay

The study was published in the Medical Journal of Australia.

Although legally cannabis must be prescribed by a doctor, recent reports of cannabis derivatives being successful in treating children with epilepsy have led to a number of parents of sick children sourcing their own medical marijuana.

While the study’s authors said the results were significant, they stressed that the purpose of this study was about safety not efficacy.

Also Read: Oldest Known Rocks Evolved on Earth Are Result of Asteroids, Research Reveals

The US Food and Drug Administration had recently approved Epidiolex (cannabidiol) [CBD] oral solution for the treatment of seizures associated with two rare and severe forms of epilepsy — Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and Dravet syndrome — in patients two years of age and older. (IANS)

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