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Fine dining restro Sandys sure knows its way to food and cocktails

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Image source: bitequest.com

By Ankit Sinha

Gurgaon: The Delhi-NCR region is witnessing a rise in awareness about pairing cocktails and food, thanks to the advent of several European-style fine-dining restaurants opening there. One such restro-bar is Sandys Cocktails and Kitchen, which is making a buzz for all the right reasons.

With an intelligent and eclectic mix of tequila, vodka and whisky, along with hearty lamb, chicken and pork flavours, Sandys Cocktails and Kitchen have an array of tastes to offer.

However delicious a cocktail may be, its taste gets a dozen times better when paired with an ideal dish containing the right flavours. At an especially curated dinner table meet at the restro-bar, the guests were served exclusively crafted non-vegetarian and vegetarian menus which encompassed an array of lip-smacking yet elegantly flavoured dishes.

Imagine savouring a Vesper cocktail (inspired by the James Bond movie “Casino Royale”) enhancing the citric flavour of a Bratwurst, a German pork sausage, in cosy environs with wooden interiors inspired by Bavarian architecture and blues and jazz playing in the background.

But that’s not all. As the taste buds begin to tickle and yearn for more, the next dish, a chicken Caesar salad, which includes Romaine hearts, garlic melba with grilled chicken and bacon bits, comes along with its accompaniment, a cocktail named Last Tango in Modena.

The cocktail comprised bell pepper infused tequila, slit green chilly, passion fruit pure muddled with basil and shaken with orange juice and lime juice. Garnished with rose petal ice cube. The green leaves and the grilled chicken flavour went well with the passion fruit and chilly flavours in the cocktail.

After that were served the Hungarian Goulash, which included a hearty lamb soup, with carrots, potatoes and onions, seasoned with paprika and served with the interestingly named Smok’d Celery Bloody Bitch cocktail. The cocktail had an interesting combination of vodka and tomato juice and a combination of other spices, with Sandys’ own twist – adding spiced juice with smoked sea salt, lime and celery juice foam.

In the main course, the braised lamb shanks were cooked in its own juices and served with globe artichokes, green pea and truffle risotto, sauteed spinach and shallot confit and was served with the simplest cocktail of the evening, the old fashioned whisky cocktail.

Lastly, guests were served with the new age Tiramisu, which included mascarpone, Kahlua, Savioardi and served with Espresso Martini with Hazelnut Foam.

Sandeep Verma, the owner of Sandys Cocktails and Kitchen, said the vision behind the restro-bar was “an instant concept, as I always wanted to open a cosy homely place with a soul and character of its own”.

“I wanted to create a place with a soul and character rather than building it. I always wanted to incorporate five elements- earth, air, water, fire, ether, and wood as the sixth element should be the umami effect of Sandys hospitality ‘Atithi Devo Bhava’,” Verma told reporters.

Besides, Verma also has a bar school running at his establishment.

“The place was designed in a manner where we could conduct professional bartenders coaching during the day, from Monday to Friday. Weekends are for our guests and customers to learn their favourite recipe or learn more about whisky tastings or wine appreciations. We take pride in creating good cocktails and we love sharing recipes with our patrons,” he added.(IANS)

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Quality of Food Plays Key Role in Deciding Kids’ Behaviour: Study

Poor gut bacteria may turn your kid into a problem child

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Kids behviour
Parents, it is time to check the quality of their food as microbiome in the gut plays a key role in deciding kids' behaviour. Pixabay

Parents, according to a latest health news if your kids throw attitude and do not listen to you despite repeated warnings at home, it is time to check the quality of their food as microbiome in the gut plays a key role in deciding kids’ behaviour, a novel study has found.

The study of early school-aged children (in the age group of 5-7) showed a connection between the bacteria in their gut and their behaviour, said researchers, adding that parents play a key role in their kids’ microbiome beyond the food they provide.

“Childhood is a formative period of behavioural and biological development that can be modified, for better or worse, by caregivers and the environments they help determine,” said microbiology and statistics researcher Tom Sharpton Oregon State University.

The gut microbiota features more than 10 trillion microbial cells from about 1,000 different bacterial species.

Kids behviour
The study of early school-aged children (in the age group of 5-7) showed a connection between the bacteria in their gut and their behaviour. Pixabay

The researchers, which included scientists from Stanford University and University of Manitoba, surveyed the gut microbiomes of 40 school-aged children.

The scientists collected stool from the children and parents filled out questionnaires on socioeconomic risk, behavioural dysregulation, caregiver behavior, demography, gut-related history (like antibiotic use) and a week-long diet journal.

They used a technique known as shotgun metagenomics to apply whole-genome sequencing to all of the organisms found in the subjects’ stool.

The technique gives insight into which microbes live in the gut and their functions.

“One of the novel associations we found was between Type VI secretion systems and behaviour,” said Keaton Stagaman of the OSU College of Science.

The findings, published in the journal mBio, are important because microbiome can shed light on which children are heading toward mental health challenges.

“Future studies will hopefully show whether these secretion systems have direct or indirect effects on the gut-brain axis and which organisms carry these systems,” Sharpton said.

Also Read- India Registers an Uptick in Diabetes and Thyroid: Report

The gut-brain axis, the reciprocal communication between the enteric nervous system and mood or behaviour, is a rapidly growing and exciting body of research.

The researchers said that future work should also take a close look at the impacts of diet on the microbiome and behaviour. (IANS)