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First Trump regime homicide of Indian: Telangana youngster murdered in US

His car was stopped by the gunman, who shot him at close range and took away Vamsi's wallet, as told by Vamsi's relatives in Warangal

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Donald Trump at Press Conference- Image Courtesy- Wikimedia

Warangal, 15th February, 2017: A young man belonging to Warangal district of Telangana was murdered from close range in San Fransico, California on Saturday evening. This is the first perilous homicide since Donald Trump became president and assumed office.

The suspect is said to be a caucasian. Vamsi Reddy Mamidala was driving back to his apartment after completing his shift in a part time job. His car was stopped by the gunman, who shot him at close range and took away Vamsi’s wallet, as told by Vamsi’s relatives in Warangal.

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Vamsi Reddy Mamidala completed his postgraduate studies from a university in Silicon valley. He studied MS course in computer science and was looking for software jobs in the area while working part-time in a store.

Dejected over son’s death, Vamsi Reddy’s father Mamidala Mohan Reddy, a farmer, told New Indian Express, “He spoke to me two days ago. He was very worried about his future as the new government in the US is imposing restrictions on the hiring of foreign nationals in the IT sector. I asked him not to worry about getting a job and asked him to come back to India. But he was gone within two days.”

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Vamsi Reddy Mamidala’s parents reside in the Vangapahad in Hasanparthy mandal of Warangal district. He had gone to the US in 2014 after completing a BTech degree in Vathsalya Institute of Science & Technology (VIST) located at Bhongir in Nalgonda district.

 

– prepared by Sabhyata Badhwar of NewsGram. Twitter: @SabbyDarkhorse

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California Becomes the first US State to allow Gender-neutral Birth Certificates

The so-called "nonbinary" gender means not exclusively male or female or a combination of two or more "genders."

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The law, published on the government official website, also made it easier for people to change their gender identity on official documents. Pixabay

California, October 17, 2017 : California Governor Jerry Brown has signed a state senate bill, allowing a gender-neutral marker on birth certificates and driver’s licenses starting from 2019.

California thus became the first state in the US to allow a “nonbinary” gender to be marked on birth certificates, Xinhua news agency reported.

The so-called “nonbinary” gender means not exclusively male or female or a combination of two or more “genders.”

According to the Gender Recognition Act approved on Sunday, California will offer a gender-neutral option on state documents for those who are transgender, intersex and others who are not identified as male or female.

ALSO READ Finding their place in the world; Oxford Dictionary to include honorific Mx for transgenders

The law, published on the government official website, also made it easier for people to change their gender identity on official documents.

“Existing law authorises a person who was born in this state and who has undergone clinically appropriate treatment for the purpose of gender transition to obtain a new birth certificate from the State Registrar,” the bill read.

The Golden State is now also the second state in the US to allow residents to be identified by a gender marker other than “F” or “M” on their driver’s license.

Oregon and the District of Columbia had earlier issued the gender-neutral option on their driver’s licenses.

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Cab driver leaves Indian-descent woman to die after the vehicle catches fire

The driver was seen weaving in and out of traffic before his 2007 Infiniti G35 car hit the road divider and caught fire, according to witnesses.

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The Indian descent woman was left inside the car and burnt to death (Representative image) Piaxabay

New York, October 15, 2017 : A woman of Indian-descent was left to die in a car by the driver who left her behind after the vehicle caught fire in New York, according to media reports.

Firefighters found the charred body of 25-year-old Harleen Grewal early Friday morning, the New York Daily News reported.

The driver of the car, Saeed Ahmad, 23, whom the daily described as “heartless”, flagged down a taxi near the scene of the incident to go to a hospital.

WABC TV broadcast a chilling video showing Ahmad stopping the taxi saying, “Can I get a ride?” while the vehicle was in flames.

The police caught him at the hospital, where he was being treated for burns to his arms and legs, and charged him with homicide and several other offences relating to the incident.

His driving licence had been suspended prior to the accident making it illegal for him to drive.

Police sources told the New York Daily News that Ahmad had a few drinks before the crash but a blood test showed he was not legally drunk.

He was seen weaving in and out of traffic before his 2007 Infiniti G35 car hit the road divider and caught fire, according to witnesses.

Ahmad told the police that he was dating Grewal, the daughter of Punjabi immigrants.

Ahmad’s brother, Waheed, claimed that he had tried to rescue Grewal. (IANS)

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Recent Trends among the Indian Diaspora and its Increasing Significance

As the Indian diaspora is increasingly organizing itself in the host countries by accumulating the resources, it may have potential impact on the economic, social and political landscape in India.

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Indian Diaspora organizing community identity in the host country

The Indian diaspora is a generic term representing the people who migrated from the Indian territories to the other parts of the world. It includes the descendants of these groups. Today, over twenty million Indians which include Non-Resident Indians and People of Indian Origin are residing outside the Indian territory as Indian diaspora. According to a UN survey report of 2015, India’s diaspora population is the largest in the world. In 2005, Indians formed the world’s third-largest diaspora. The Indians who settled overseas in the 1960s for more developed countries such as US, UK, Canada, Australia and Western Europe formulate the category of the New Diaspora.

What are the popular host countries for the Indian Diaspora:

The 2010 estimates of Census data of US, UK and Canada suggest that Indian diaspora constitutes three million people in US, 1.5 million people in the United Kingdom and one million in Canada. Indians are the fourth largest immigrant group in the United States. Also, five million emigrants from India residing in the Gulf region at present.

The History of Indian Diaspora:

A brief overview of the history of Indian diaspora suggests that the first group of Indians immigrated to Eastern Europe in the 1st century AD from Rajasthan during the reign of Kanishka. Yet another evidence of migration was witnessed in 500 AD when a group immigrated to Southeast Asia as the Cholas extended their empire to Indonesia and Malaysia thereby spreading the Indian culture in these states. Thus the early evidence of the diaspora was found during ancient times. The medieval period witnessed the spread of Hinduism and Buddhism during the Hindu and Buddhist kingdoms. Mughals took Indians as traders, scholars, artists, musicians, and emissaries to the other parts of the country.

Old Diaspora:

The first wave of the Modern Indian Diaspora, also called the Old Diaspora, began in the early 19th century and continued until the end of the British rule. The Dutch and French colonizers followed the suit. Indians were sent in large numbers to become the bonded labourers for sugar and rubber plantation in their colonies.

Indians in Caribbean, Africa, and Asia:

By the end of World War 1, there were 1.5 million Indian laborers in the colonies in the Caribbean, Africa, and Asia. At present, around 60% of Indian diaspora is constituted of this Old Diaspora.

Impact of Immigration policies on Migration from India:

After the Indian independence, a large number of unskilled and some skilled Punjabi male Sikhs migrated to the UK from India due to favorable immigration policies in the United Kingdom. Similarly, the 1990s onwards, due to software boom and its rising economy, H-1B was introduced in the US immigration policy that allowed the entry of highly skilled IT specialists, doctors, scientists and engineers in the US. Further, the 1970s witnessed oil boom in the Middle East that led to significant growth of Indian diaspora in the Gulf region.

While the low skilled and semi-skilled workers are moving to the Gulf region for better economic opportunities, highly skilled labor is moving from India to US, UK, Canada, Australia and New Zealand.

Has Indian Diaspora started impacting the economies and societies:

With the growing rate of international migration since the beginning of millennia, there is a significant impact of diaspora on the economies and societies of the world. In recent years, the diaspora is influencing the economic, political and cultural affairs in their homeland. It is so because the influence of the diaspora communities increases as they organize themselves and accumulate resources in their host countries for several years. The mobilized diaspora are now influencing the affairs of the homeland countries. A common form of exchange is the financial remittances provided to the relatives by the diaspora community. Overseas family networks of the political elites in India are shaping the political landscape as well. Culturally, the diaspora is influencing the music and literature trends in India as the content is consciously structured to cater to the tastes of the diaspora.

What actions have been taken by the government of India to tap the potential of Indian Diaspora:

The first Pravasi Bhartiya Divas was organized in 2003 by the Government of India to expand and reshape the state of India’s economy by the use of the potential human capital which the Indian diaspora reflects. Clearly, Indian diaspora has a larger role to play in the Indian economy over the coming years as the efforts to mobilize them increase in the homeland.