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First Trump regime homicide of Indian: Telangana youngster murdered in US

His car was stopped by the gunman, who shot him at close range and took away Vamsi's wallet, as told by Vamsi's relatives in Warangal

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Donald Trump at Press Conference- Image Courtesy- Wikimedia
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Warangal, 15th February, 2017: A young man belonging to Warangal district of Telangana was murdered from close range in San Fransico, California on Saturday evening. This is the first perilous homicide since Donald Trump became president and assumed office.

The suspect is said to be a caucasian. Vamsi Reddy Mamidala was driving back to his apartment after completing his shift in a part time job. His car was stopped by the gunman, who shot him at close range and took away Vamsi’s wallet, as told by Vamsi’s relatives in Warangal.

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Vamsi Reddy Mamidala completed his postgraduate studies from a university in Silicon valley. He studied MS course in computer science and was looking for software jobs in the area while working part-time in a store.

Dejected over son’s death, Vamsi Reddy’s father Mamidala Mohan Reddy, a farmer, told New Indian Express, “He spoke to me two days ago. He was very worried about his future as the new government in the US is imposing restrictions on the hiring of foreign nationals in the IT sector. I asked him not to worry about getting a job and asked him to come back to India. But he was gone within two days.”

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Vamsi Reddy Mamidala’s parents reside in the Vangapahad in Hasanparthy mandal of Warangal district. He had gone to the US in 2014 after completing a BTech degree in Vathsalya Institute of Science & Technology (VIST) located at Bhongir in Nalgonda district.

 

– prepared by Sabhyata Badhwar of NewsGram. Twitter: @SabbyDarkhorse

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Team Led by Indian-Origin Scientist Converts Plant Matter Into Chemicals

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A team led by an Indian-origin scientist from Sandia National Laboratories in California has demonstrated a new technology based on bio-engineered bacteria that can make it economically feasible to produce chemicals from renewable plant sources.
Lignin, a tough plant matter, is converted into chemicals. Pixabay

A team led by an Indian-origin scientist from Sandia National Laboratories in California has demonstrated a new technology based on bio-engineered bacteria that can make it economically feasible to produce chemicals from renewable plant sources.

The technology converts tough plant matter, called lignin, for wider use of the energy source and making it cost competitive.

“For years, we have been researching cost-effective ways to break down lignin and convert it into valuable platform chemicals,” Sandia bioengineer Seema Singh said.

“We applied our understanding of natural lignin degraders to E. coli because that bacterium grows fast and can survive harsh industrial processes,” she added in the work published in the “Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America”.

Lignin is the component of plant cell walls that gives them their incredible strength. It is brimming with energy but getting to that energy is so costly and complex that the resulting biofuel can’t compete economically with other forms of transportation energy.

A team led by an Indian-origin scientist from Sandia National Laboratories in California has demonstrated a new technology based on bio-engineered bacteria that can make it economically feasible to produce chemicals from renewable plant sources.
Scientists successfully convert plant matter into chemicals. Pixabay

Once broken down, lignin has other gifts to give in the form of valuable platform chemicals that can be converted into nylon, plastics, pharmaceuticals and other valuable products.

Singh and her team have solved three problems with turning lignin into platform chemicals: cost, toxicity and speed.

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Engineering solutions like these, which overcome toxicity and efficiency issues have the potential to make biofuel production economically viable.

“Now we can work on producing greater quantities of platform chemicals, engineering pathways to new end products, and considering microbial hosts other than E. coli,” Singh (IANS)