Tuesday November 19, 2019
Home Uncategorized Five financia...

Five financial institutions helping in women empowerment in India

0
//

By Shivya Malhotra

New Delhi: Cooperative financial institutions in India have contributed immensely not only in empowering women but also encouraging them to march towards the realm of development. Not only did they usher a paradigm change in the society but also improved women’s social and economic condition in all spheres of life.

Being autonomous in nature, the cooperatives focus on the welfare of the members associated with it thereby making lives better without being under the control of a single person.

Here are five women-centric cooperatives which played a pivotal role in changing futures of many Indian women.

Kodachadri Women Souharda Cooperative Credit Society

This first all-women society of its kind came into existence in Tirthahalli Taluk under the Karnataka Souharda Sahakari Act. The society provides loans to help women entrepreneurs who are interested in setting up various ventures including handicraft, packaging, dairy farming, and handlooms earn a livelihood.  Over 2,500 women have benefited from the society.

Lauding the initiative of the society, President of the Karnataka Cooperative Apex Bank, R M Manjunatha Gowda said, “the society is looking further to provide skill-based and vocational training for rural women.”

The society has encouraged many women to be self-sufficient and contribute to the growth of the Indian economy.

Subhalaxmi Bahumukhee Mahila Samabaya Samiti Ltd.

The tenacity of 10 women transformed the lives of over 2,500 women in Jharsugda district by organizing them in Self Help Groups (SHG). Starting with nine villages, the group reached out to 51 villages to empower women. The body provides loans, helps in business plans, and carries out other activities to assist rural women in self-sustainability.

Shri Mahila Sewa Sahakari Bank Ltd.

This Micro-finance institution, established in  1974 as an Urban Cooperative, shaped the future of many women working in the unorganized sector.  Besides providing loans, they also help in charting strategies for small and medium scale business.

The 4,000 women members contributed Rs 10 each to inaugurate the Shri Mahila Sewa Sahakari Bank Ltd. Since then, the organization acts as a helping hand to the women workers caught in the vicious cycle of poverty.

Nayuma Women’s Co-operative Society Ltd.

Set up in August 2001, Nayuma Women’s Co-operative Society Ltd is fulfilling the need to generate employment for marginalized women. The body trains women in various fields, especially tailoring and cutting. The trainees are also given opportunities to get themselves established. Later, manufacturing of craftwork and handloom products was expanded into a large scale of business activities.

Mann Deshi Bank

The organization, since 1997, has been catering to the needs of rural women by providing financial services to them. The society went ahead to open seven branches and provided assistance to countless women for self-sustainability.

“In order to fulfill the need of rural poor and make ‘Jan Dhan Yojana’ a success, the Banking system in India needs a reinvention.” Said the founder,  Chetna Sinha.

Being the second largest microfinance bank in India, the organization is still ensuring to accumulate high results for the society as a whole.

These institutions have ushered in a new India where women are actively taking part in the nation-building process. The government needs to look into these and provide all out assistance and help setting up such bodies to reach to the women across the country.

Next Story

Here’s Why Women Should Not Dine After 6 PM

Women who dine late in the evening are likely to develop heart diseases

0
Women
Women should not consume higher proportionate of calories late in the evening. Pixabay

Women who consume a higher proportion of their daily calories late in the evening are more likely to be at risk of cardiovascular disease than women who do not, researchers have warned.

For the study, the research team assessed the cardiovascular health of 112 women using the American Heart Association’s Life’s Simple 7 measures at the beginning of the study and one year later.

Life’s Simple 7 represents the risk factors that people can improve through lifestyle changes to help achieve ideal cardiovascular health and include not smoking, being physically active, eating healthy foods and controlling body weight, along with measuring cholesterol, blood pressure and blood sugar levels.

A heart health score based on meeting the Life’s Simple 7 was computed.

“The preliminary results indicate that intentional eating that is mindful of the timing and proportion of calories in evening meals may represent a simple, modifiable behaviour that can help lower heart disease risk,” said study lead author Nour Makarem from Columbia University in the US.

During the study, participants of the study kept electronic food diaries by computer or cell phone to report what, how much and when they ate for one week at the beginning of the study and for one week 12 months later.

Women, heart disease
Women should consume less calories in the evening for a healthy heart. Pixabay

Data from the food diary completed by each woman was used to determine the relationship between heart health and the timing of when they ate.

Researchers found that, after 6 p.m. with every one per cent calories consumed heart health declined, especially for women.

These women were found more likely to have higher blood pressure, higher body mass index and poorer long-term control of blood sugar.

Similar findings occurred with every one per cent increase in calories consumed after 8 p.m.

Also Read- Study Associates Air Pollution With Heart Attack

“It is never too early to start thinking about your heart health whether you’re 20 or 30 or 40 or moving into the 60s and 70s. If you’re healthy now or if you have heart disease, you can always do more. That goes along with being heart smart and heart healthy,” said study researcher Kristin Newby, Professor at Duke University.

The study is scheduled to be presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2019 from November 16-18 in Philadelphia, US. (IANS)