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Five things that make Gurgaon so Special

Many people and families come to the city for a work assignment, but after spending a few years, look for flats for sale in Gurgaon.

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Guragon or Gurugram is a city which is young, awakening and full of opportunities. People come to the city from various parts of the country and identify themselves as Gurgaoities, even though they have been living there for only few years. And then there are those who are born and bought up in the city, which many would agree is a little odd to hear, as most of us have a little or negligible memory of Gurgaon before the year 2000. Many people and families come to the city for a work assignment, but after spending a few years, look for flats for sale in Gurgaon, because they feel attached to its metropolitan demeanour. It doesn’t matter how long you have been associated with this millennium city, but we’ll all agree that city life can be fun, adventurous and unlike any other place in India.  Here are the top 5 things that make Gurgaon so special:

  • Rahagiri

Started in November, 2013 Rahagiri is India’s first citizen initiative of its kind that urges people to go car-free and instead take on sustainable and active transport that promotes good health and greater participation by the city’s residents. This movement caught a lot of media attention and was fully supported by the city’s administration, actively help in organizing this weekly event that takes place every Sunday. Upon the success of Rahgiri in Gurgaon, similar initiatives were replicated in different neighbourhood across Delhi namely Connaught Place, Rohini, Dwarka etc.

  • Galleria Market, DLF-Phase IV

Those who have been living in Gurgaon since 2007 will agree that it was the best place to shop during that time. The residents Gurgaon, irrespective of their address would head to Galleria located at DLF-Phase IV to shop. However, today with emergence of several commercial hubs, trips to the Galleria market may have reduced, but the legacy from old days continues. For starters, it was home to the only authorized Apple resellers in Gurgaon for the longest time. You also get the best rolls at Lazeez foods and recently a number of new restaurants and coffee houses have opened up. The fountain area, which is right in the center, is an excellent place to lounge on a laid back summer evening with friends.  The entire atmosphere of Galleria is extremely youthful and energetic. People living in the nearby neighbourhoods often head to Galleria in lazy outfits for a quick stroll or simply hanging out.

  • Cyber Hub

DLF’s Cyber Hub ranks no. 1 on 54 things to do in Gurgaon list on popular travel website, tripadvisor.  A welcome break from mall culture, cyber hub changed the concept of “night out” in the city. Right next to Cyber City, India’s largest corporate shack, the place is flooded with food joint, multi-cuisine restaurants and upscale store. Since two years of its existence, it has become the favourite place amongst Gurgaonwallahas and neighbouring Delhiwallahas to fine dine & wine. Young professionals often head out for a post work hanging out session for quick drinks and dinner.  It is one of the best places to unwind after work and relax with colleagues or friends. Although, the footfalls are highest during the weekends, on weekdays the place is also bustling with people, with many restaurants and brewery organizing promotional events such as ladies nights etc.

  • Kingdom of Dreams

As described my many, Kingdom of dreams is a get place to visit if you are looking for an evening of entertainment and leisure with friends or family.  Located in the heart of the city, the place attracts many international and local visitors to give a glimpse into India’s culture, heritage, arts, craft and performing arts. If you are in Gurgaon for the first time, visiting Kingdom of Dreams will give you real value of your time and money. There are live Bollywood themed shows and theater and a number of food options, which are most traditional Indian cuisine.

  • Aravalli Bio-diversity Park

Located on Delhi-Gurgaon border, very close to Gurudronacharya Metro station, the Aravalli bio-diversity park is home to running and cycling tracks, amphitheater and wetlands and ponds that attracts thousands of migratory birds every year.  The range has a thick preserve of indigenous fauna and flora. A number from fitness enthusiasts go there during weekends for a run or to cycle. Thanks to the clean and pristine environment, a number of residential projects are expected to come up in the adjoining area of the Aravalli range. A number of flats for sale in Gurgaon are already available, overlooking the bio-diversity park.

To sum up, Gurgaon is new city. Within a short span on two decades, it has metamorphosed into a metropolis, where people from different nationality and regional identity are living in harmony. Located at a close distance from the airport and Delhi, it is becoming the most favoured residential option for many people.

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  • Pritam Go Green

    Other cities should track the pattern of development in these cities like Gurgaon. Then only we’ll be able to fulfill the dreams of our prime minister Narendra Modi. There are many unplanned cities that needs to be modified.

Next Story

Most Terrible Water Crisis Ever In History Leaves Millions Of Indians Thirsty

6 percent of GDP is very much dependent on water.

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A woman washes clothes as her daughter bathes in the Yamuna River on a hot day in New Delhi, India, April 24, 2017.
A woman washes clothes as her daughter bathes in the Yamuna River on a hot day in New Delhi, India, April 24, 2017. VOA

Weak infrastructure and a national shortage have made water costly all over India, but Sushila Devi paid a higher price than most. It took the deaths of her husband and son to force authorities to supply it to the slum she calls home.

“They died because of the water problem, nothing else,” said Devi, 40, as she recalled how a brawl over a water tanker carrying clean drinking water in March killed her two relatives and finally prompted the government to drill a tubewell.

“Now things are better. But earlier … the water used to be rusty, we could not even wash our hands or feet with that kind of water,” she told the Thomson Reuters Foundation in Delhi.

India is “suffering from the worst water crisis in its history”, threatening hundreds of millions of lives and jeopardising economic growth, a government think-tank report said in June.

From the northern Himalayas to the sandy, palm-fringed beaches in the south, 600 million people – nearly half India’s population – face acute water shortage, with close to 200,000 dying each year from polluted water.

Residents like Devi queue daily with pipes, jerry cans and buckets in hand for water from tankers – a common lifeline for those without a safe, reliable municipal supply – often involving elbowing, pushing and punching.

On the rare occasions water does flow from taps, it is often dirty, leading to disease, infection, disability and even death, experts say.

“The water was like poison,” said Devi, who still relies on the tanker for drinking water, outside her one-room shanty in the chronically water-stressed Wazirpur area of the capital Delhi.

“It is better now, but still it is not completely drinkable. It is alright for bathing and washing the dishes.”

Water pollution is a major challenge, the report said, with nearly 70 percent of India’s water contaminated, impacting three in four Indians and contributing to 20 percent of the country’s disease burden.

Yet only one-third of its wastewater is currently treated, meaning raw sewage flows into rivers, lakes and ponds – and eventually gets into the groundwater.

“Our surface water is contaminated, our groundwater is contaminated. See, everywhere water is being contaminated because we are not managing our solid waste properly,” said the report’s author Avinash Mishra.
Loss of livelihood

Meanwhile, unchecked extraction by farmers and wealthy residents has caused groundwater levels to plunge to record lows, says the report.

It predicts that 21 major cities, including New Delhi and India’s IT hub of Bengaluru, will run out of groundwater by 2020, affecting 100 million people.

The head of WaterAid India VK Madhavan said the country’s groundwater was now heavily contaminated.

“We are grappling with issues, with areas that have arsenic contamination, fluoride contamination, with salinity, with nitrates,” he said, listing chemicals that have been linked to cancer.

Arsenic and fluoride occur naturally in the groundwater, but become more concentrated as the water becomes scarcer, while nitrates come from fertilisers, pesticides and other industrial waste that has seeped into the supply.

The level of chemicals in the water was so high, he said, that bacterial contamination – the source of water-borne diseases such as diarrhoea, cholera and typhoid – “is in the second order of problems”.

“Poor quality of water – that is loss of livelihood. You fall ill because you don’t have access to safe drinking water, because your water is contaminated.”

Currently, only 70 percent of India’s states treat less than half of their wastewater.
Currently, only 70 percent of India’s states treat less than half of their wastewater. pixabay

“The burden of not having access to safe drinking water, that burden is greatest on the poor and the price is paid by them.”

Frothy lakes and rivers

Crippling water problems could shave 6 percent off India’s gross domestic product, according to the report by the government think-tank, Niti Aayog.

“This 6 percent of GDP is very much dependent on water. Our industry, our food security, everything will be at stake,” said Mishra.

“It is a finite resource. It is not infinite. One day it can (become) extinct,” he said, warning that by 2030 India’s water supply will be half of the demand.

To tackle this crisis, which is predicted to get worse, the government has urged states – responsible for supplying clean water to residents – to prioritise treating waste water to bridge the supply and demand gap and to save lives.

Currently, only 70 percent of India’s states treat less than half of their wastewater.

Every year, Bengaluru and New Delhi make global headlines as their heavily polluted water bodies emit clouds of white toxic froth due to a mix of industrial effluents and domestic garbage dumped into them.

In Bengaluru – once known as the “city of lakes” and now doomed to go dry – the Bellandur Lake bursts into flames often, sending plumes of black smoke into sky.

The Yamuna river that flows through New Delhi can be seen covered under a thick, detergent-like foam on some days.

On other days, faeces, chemicals and ashes from human cremations float on top, forcing passers-by to cover their mouths and noses against the stench.

That does not stop 10-year-old Gauri, who lives in a nearby slum, from jumping in every day.

With no access to water, it is the only way to cool herself down during India’s scorching summers, when temperatures soar to 45 Celsius (113 Fahrenheit).

“There usually is not enough water for us to take a shower, so we come here,” said Gauri, who only gave her first name, as she and her brother splashed around in the filthy river.

Also read: India’s bulging water crisis: Is it too late for us to do something?

“It makes us itchy and sick, but only for some time. We are happy to have this, everyone can use it.” (VOA)