Monday November 18, 2019
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Footpath Shopping is not a Taboo anymore: Find out why!

Due to popularity, the average earning of a vendor, at a busy market place is not less than Rs1,500 to Rs4,000 per day

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Footpath Stalls, Pune. Image source: shoppinglanes.com
  • People, irrespective of their economic conditions, shop on footpaths as the items are affordable 
  • Women go for footpath shopping as they can bargain, which is not possible in branded outlets
  • Nowadays, in a busy market, the average earning of a vendor is not less than Rs1,500 to Rs4,000 per day

Patna: There are several myths regarding footpath shopping in India and one of many reasons is that some feel, people belonging to lower strata or economically weaker sections of the society go for it. But with change in mindset, it has now become one of the sought after destinations not only for collegians but also for people from well-to-do families.

People are opting for footpath shopping over malls as they find similar products that match the style or look of the branded items. Not just that, they are affordable too, which makes it popular especially with shopaholics. There is more to this one. What the women love is the feel good thing about bargaining which is a complete no-no in malls.

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Women and college goers, especially girls, seem to be the newest crowd at the footpath shops on Boring Road near the Patna market, Maurya Lok complex. They, just as in the past, are able to find affordable items that they want/need without having to pay a hefty price.

Footpath Shops. Wikimedia Images.
Footpath Shops. Wikimedia Images.

One regular shopper, Maira, said, “You find really attractive material while roaming along the streets. Bargaining is the biggest plus point of street merchandise and sometimes it is adventurous also as there is every possibility of paying more even after a hard bargain.”

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“Sources in the trade revealed that there was a time when a vendor ended his day with just Rs 200 or Rs300 profit. These days, the average earning of a vendor, at a busy market place, is not less than Rs1,500 to Rs4,000 per day,” said a TOI report.

A footwear vendor, Mohammad Parvez, stated “People, irrespective of their economic conditions, shop on footpaths. Most of the buyers are college girls because they can’t afford costly footwear sold in malls and branded shops.” He now makes somewhere between Rs3,000 and Rs4,000 per day.

An street vendor, Chintu who sells artificial jewellery at Patna Market, also claimed that women from all economic strata come to his shop. “My products are affordable and attract women as they can change their jewellery frequently, which is not possible if they buy gold or platinum jewellery,” said Chintu to TOI, whose daily sale is between Rs1500 and Rs2000.

-This article is compiled by a Staff-writer at NewsGram.

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Next Story

Here’s Why Women Should Not Dine After 6 PM

Women who dine late in the evening are likely to develop heart diseases

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Women
Women should not consume higher proportionate of calories late in the evening. Pixabay

Women who consume a higher proportion of their daily calories late in the evening are more likely to be at risk of cardiovascular disease than women who do not, researchers have warned.

For the study, the research team assessed the cardiovascular health of 112 women using the American Heart Association’s Life’s Simple 7 measures at the beginning of the study and one year later.

Life’s Simple 7 represents the risk factors that people can improve through lifestyle changes to help achieve ideal cardiovascular health and include not smoking, being physically active, eating healthy foods and controlling body weight, along with measuring cholesterol, blood pressure and blood sugar levels.

A heart health score based on meeting the Life’s Simple 7 was computed.

“The preliminary results indicate that intentional eating that is mindful of the timing and proportion of calories in evening meals may represent a simple, modifiable behaviour that can help lower heart disease risk,” said study lead author Nour Makarem from Columbia University in the US.

During the study, participants of the study kept electronic food diaries by computer or cell phone to report what, how much and when they ate for one week at the beginning of the study and for one week 12 months later.

Women, heart disease
Women should consume less calories in the evening for a healthy heart. Pixabay

Data from the food diary completed by each woman was used to determine the relationship between heart health and the timing of when they ate.

Researchers found that, after 6 p.m. with every one per cent calories consumed heart health declined, especially for women.

These women were found more likely to have higher blood pressure, higher body mass index and poorer long-term control of blood sugar.

Similar findings occurred with every one per cent increase in calories consumed after 8 p.m.

Also Read- Study Associates Air Pollution With Heart Attack

“It is never too early to start thinking about your heart health whether you’re 20 or 30 or 40 or moving into the 60s and 70s. If you’re healthy now or if you have heart disease, you can always do more. That goes along with being heart smart and heart healthy,” said study researcher Kristin Newby, Professor at Duke University.

The study is scheduled to be presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2019 from November 16-18 in Philadelphia, US. (IANS)