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Footpath Shopping is not a Taboo anymore: Find out why!

Due to popularity, the average earning of a vendor, at a busy market place is not less than Rs1,500 to Rs4,000 per day

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Footpath Stalls, Pune. Image source: shoppinglanes.com
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  • People, irrespective of their economic conditions, shop on footpaths as the items are affordable 
  • Women go for footpath shopping as they can bargain, which is not possible in branded outlets
  • Nowadays, in a busy market, the average earning of a vendor is not less than Rs1,500 to Rs4,000 per day

Patna: There are several myths regarding footpath shopping in India and one of many reasons is that some feel, people belonging to lower strata or economically weaker sections of the society go for it. But with change in mindset, it has now become one of the sought after destinations not only for collegians but also for people from well-to-do families.

People are opting for footpath shopping over malls as they find similar products that match the style or look of the branded items. Not just that, they are affordable too, which makes it popular especially with shopaholics. There is more to this one. What the women love is the feel good thing about bargaining which is a complete no-no in malls.

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Women and college goers, especially girls, seem to be the newest crowd at the footpath shops on Boring Road near the Patna market, Maurya Lok complex. They, just as in the past, are able to find affordable items that they want/need without having to pay a hefty price.

Footpath Shops. Wikimedia Images.
Footpath Shops. Wikimedia Images.

One regular shopper, Maira, said, “You find really attractive material while roaming along the streets. Bargaining is the biggest plus point of street merchandise and sometimes it is adventurous also as there is every possibility of paying more even after a hard bargain.”

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“Sources in the trade revealed that there was a time when a vendor ended his day with just Rs 200 or Rs300 profit. These days, the average earning of a vendor, at a busy market place, is not less than Rs1,500 to Rs4,000 per day,” said a TOI report.

A footwear vendor, Mohammad Parvez, stated “People, irrespective of their economic conditions, shop on footpaths. Most of the buyers are college girls because they can’t afford costly footwear sold in malls and branded shops.” He now makes somewhere between Rs3,000 and Rs4,000 per day.

An street vendor, Chintu who sells artificial jewellery at Patna Market, also claimed that women from all economic strata come to his shop. “My products are affordable and attract women as they can change their jewellery frequently, which is not possible if they buy gold or platinum jewellery,” said Chintu to TOI, whose daily sale is between Rs1500 and Rs2000.

-This article is compiled by a Staff-writer at NewsGram.

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  • Aparna Gupta

    Footpath shopping is gaining priority these days. It gives freedom to the buyers of roaming around.

  • Vrushali Mahajan

    Footpath shopping is not as bad as it looks. In Mumbai, you have Bandra, Colaba street markets which are very famous amongst people and they love to shop on such road markets

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  • Aparna Gupta

    Footpath shopping is gaining priority these days. It gives freedom to the buyers of roaming around.

  • Vrushali Mahajan

    Footpath shopping is not as bad as it looks. In Mumbai, you have Bandra, Colaba street markets which are very famous amongst people and they love to shop on such road markets

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Diabetic Women at Greater Risk of Developing Cancer Than Men, According to a New Study

Overall, it was calculated that women with diabetes were six per cent more likely to develop any form of cancer than men with diabetes

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The researchers found that women with diabetes were 27 per cent more likely to develop cancer than women without diabetes but for men the risk was 19 per cent higher.
The researchers found that women with diabetes were 27 per cent more likely to develop cancer than women without diabetes but for men the risk was 19 per cent higher. Pixabay

Women suffering from diabetes may be at a higher risk of developing cancer than men, a new study has found.

The findings suggested that among the study participants, women with diabetes (Type 1 and Type 2) were at higher risks for developing kidney cancer (11 per cent), oral cancer (13 per cent), stomach cancer (14 per cent) and leukaemia (15 per cent) compared to men with the similar condition.

Diabetes affects more than 415 million people worldwide, with five million deaths every year.

According to the researchers, it is believed that heightened blood glucose may have cancer-causing effects by leading to DNA damage.

“The link between diabetes and the risk of developing cancer is now firmly established,” said lead author Toshiaki Ohkuma from The George Institute for Global Health in Australia.

They also found that diabetes was a risk factor for the majority of cancers of specific parts of the body for both men and women.
They also found that diabetes was a risk factor for the majority of cancers of specific parts of the body for both men and women. Pixabay

“The number of people with diabetes has doubled globally in the last 30 years but we still have much to learn about the condition,” Ohkuma added.

For the study, published in the journal Diabetologia, the researchers examined data on all-site cancer events (incident or fatal only) from 121 cohorts that included 19,239,302 individuals.

The researchers found that women with diabetes were 27 per cent more likely to develop cancer than women without diabetes but for men the risk was 19 per cent higher.

Also Read: Eating Dinner Early May Lower Risk of Breast, Prostate Cancer

They also found that diabetes was a risk factor for the majority of cancers of specific parts of the body for both men and women.

Overall, it was calculated that women with diabetes were six per cent more likely to develop any form of cancer than men with diabetes.

“It’s vital that we undertake more research into discovering what is driving this, and for both people with diabetes and the medical community to be aware of the heightened cancer risk for women and men with diabetes,” Ohkuma noted. (IANS)