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For disobeying Ramadan customs, a 90 year-old man was brutally beaten by Police in Pakistan

The 90 year-old man was brutally beaten up by the police for eating during the fasting month

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Fasting during Ramadan. Image source: Wikimedia Commons
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  • 90 year-old Hindu man was brutally beaten up for eating an hour before Muslims break their fast in Ramadan
  • A GoFundMe campaign was launched online to help fund the man’s medical care
  • Human rights groups have asked for the accused to be arrested, but not received a reply from the Government

In Pakistan, the minorities are wary of their safety, especially in the month of Ramadan because of the notorious ways employed by the government and police forces to forcefully enforce compliance with religious traditions associated with Islam. A similar situation unraveled on Saturday, June 11, where an old man was brutally beaten up by security forces.

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Gokul Das posing with bleeding hands. Image courtesy: twitter.com

90 year-old Chacha Gokal Das living in the Sindh region of Pakistan was found consuming rice at 6.30 PM outside his house, which is forty minutes before Muslims break their fast at sundown. Locals immediately summoned the authorities to have him arrested for disobeying Muslim traditions.

Ramadan is the holy month of praying and fasting for Muslims. The 90 year-old man was brutally beaten up by the police for eating during the fasting month, an event which has caused widespread outrage on Twitter. The picture of the injured man showing his bleeding hands went viral on Twitter. A campaign, called GoFundMe to help fund his medical fees was also launched owing to the fact that he was greatly stricken with poverty. These attacks come in the midst of ongoing attacks on a government licensed Hindu owned liquor store in Pakistan. Two Hindu priests were also hacked to death in two separate locations in Bangladesh, both during the month of Ramadan.

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Minority groups and human rights organisations have expressed outrage all over social media platforms and appealed to the Government for the arrests of the accused, but haven’t received any reply.

Pakistan has a population which is 97% Muslim, which is why strict Islamic laws are observed, and any individual failing to comply with these laws are often subjected to extreme cases of violence. the minority non-sunni Muslims, Sikhs, Christians and Ahmadiyyas fall under the minority quota, and are more prone to attacks.

-The article is written by a staff-writer at NewsGram

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  • devika todi

    this is atrocious! the interests of the minority community should be looked after too.

  • Paras Vashisth

    This is very shameful because u brutally beaten a 90 years old men,this is not a punishment this is sinfulness.

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Should Promote Human Rights More In Myanmar: Facebook

Facebook has roughly 20 million users in Myanmar, according to BSR, which warned Facebook faces several unresolved challenges in Myanmar.

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Facebook, myanmar
A cellphone user looks at a Facebook page at a shop in Latha street, Yangon, Myanmar. VOA

Facebook on Monday said a human rights report it commissioned on its presence in Myanmar showed it had not done enough to prevent its social network from being used to incite violence.

The report by San Francisco-based nonprofit Business for Social Responsibility (BSR) recommended that Facebook more strictly enforce its content policies, increase engagement with both Myanmar officials and civil society groups and regularly release additional data about its progress in the country.

“The report concludes that, prior to this year, we weren’t doing enough to help prevent our platform from being used to foment division and incite offline violence. We agree that we can and should do more,” Alex Warofka, a Facebook product policy manager, said in a blog post.

facebook, U.S., myanmar
A protester wearing a mask with the face of Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg, in between men wearing angry face emoji masks, is seen during a demonstration against Facebook outside Portcullis in London. VOA

BSR also warned that Facebook must be prepared to handle a likely onslaught of misinformation during Myanmar’s 2020 elections, and new problems as use of its WhatsApp grows in Myanmar, according to the report, which Facebook released.

A Reuters special report in August found that Facebook failed to promptly heed numerous warnings from organizations in Myanmar about social media posts fueling attacks on minority groups such as the Rohingya.

In August 2017 the military led a crackdown in Myanmar’s Rakhine State in response to attacks by Rohingya insurgents, pushing more than 700,000 Muslims to neighboring Bangladesh, according to U.N. agencies.

Rohingya, India, myanmar
A man from the Rohingya community fills out an identification form provided by local police inside his shop at a camp in New Delhi. VOA

 

The social media website in August removed several Myanmar military officials from the platform to prevent the spread of “hate and misinformation,” for the first time banning a country’s military or political leaders.

It also removed dozens of accounts for engaging in a campaign that “used seemingly independent news and opinion pages to covertly push the messages of the Myanmar military.”

The move came hours after United Nations investigators said the army carried out mass killings and gang rapes of Muslim Rohingya with “genocidal intent.”

Facebook said it has begun correcting shortcomings.

myanmar, facebook
A deforested section of the Chakmakul camp for Rohingya refugees clings to a hillside in southern Bangladesh, Feb. 13, 2018. VOA

Facebook said that it now has 99 Myanmar language specialists reviewing potentially questionable content. In addition, it has expanded use of automated tools to reduce distribution of violent and dehumanizing posts while they undergo review.

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In the third quarter, the company said it “took action” on about 64,000 pieces of content that violated its hate speech policies. About 63 percent were identified by automated software, up from 52 percent in the prior quarter.

Facebook has roughly 20 million users in Myanmar, according to BSR, which warned Facebook faces several unresolved challenges in Myanmar.

BSR said locating staff there, for example, could aid in Facebook’s understanding of how its services are used locally but said its workers could be targeted by the country’s military, which has been accused by the U.N. of ethnic cleansing of the Rohingya. (VOA)