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For disobeying Ramadan customs, a 90 year-old man was brutally beaten by Police in Pakistan

The 90 year-old man was brutally beaten up by the police for eating during the fasting month

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Fasting during Ramadan. Image source: Wikimedia Commons
  • 90 year-old Hindu man was brutally beaten up for eating an hour before Muslims break their fast in Ramadan
  • A GoFundMe campaign was launched online to help fund the man’s medical care
  • Human rights groups have asked for the accused to be arrested, but not received a reply from the Government

In Pakistan, the minorities are wary of their safety, especially in the month of Ramadan because of the notorious ways employed by the government and police forces to forcefully enforce compliance with religious traditions associated with Islam. A similar situation unraveled on Saturday, June 11, where an old man was brutally beaten up by security forces.

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ramadan
Gokul Das posing with bleeding hands. Image courtesy: twitter.com

90 year-old Chacha Gokal Das living in the Sindh region of Pakistan was found consuming rice at 6.30 PM outside his house, which is forty minutes before Muslims break their fast at sundown. Locals immediately summoned the authorities to have him arrested for disobeying Muslim traditions.

Ramadan is the holy month of praying and fasting for Muslims. The 90 year-old man was brutally beaten up by the police for eating during the fasting month, an event which has caused widespread outrage on Twitter. The picture of the injured man showing his bleeding hands went viral on Twitter. A campaign, called GoFundMe to help fund his medical fees was also launched owing to the fact that he was greatly stricken with poverty. These attacks come in the midst of ongoing attacks on a government licensed Hindu owned liquor store in Pakistan. Two Hindu priests were also hacked to death in two separate locations in Bangladesh, both during the month of Ramadan.

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Minority groups and human rights organisations have expressed outrage all over social media platforms and appealed to the Government for the arrests of the accused, but haven’t received any reply.

Pakistan has a population which is 97% Muslim, which is why strict Islamic laws are observed, and any individual failing to comply with these laws are often subjected to extreme cases of violence. the minority non-sunni Muslims, Sikhs, Christians and Ahmadiyyas fall under the minority quota, and are more prone to attacks.

-The article is written by a staff-writer at NewsGram

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  • devika todi

    this is atrocious! the interests of the minority community should be looked after too.

  • Paras Vashisth

    This is very shameful because u brutally beaten a 90 years old men,this is not a punishment this is sinfulness.

Next Story

Airstrike Escalates Fighting in Libya, Authorities Close Tripoli’s Only Functioning Airport

Russia objects to the British-drafted resolution blaming Haftar for the latest flare-up in violence when his LNA advanced to the outskirts of Tripoli earlier this month, diplomats said.

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Libya
Libyan protesters attend a demonstration to demand an end to the Khalifa Haftar's offensive against Tripoli, in Martyrs' Square in central Tripoli, Libya, April 19, 2019. VOA

Explosions shook the Libyan capital Tripoli late Saturday after an airstrike, residents said, in an escalation of a two-week offensive by eastern forces on the city held by the internationally recognized government.

A Reuters reporter and several interviewed residents said they saw an aircraft circling for more than 10 minutes over the capital with a humming sound before opening fire on a southern suburb, scene of the heaviest fighting between the rival forces.

Reuters was unable to confirm whether an aircraft or unmanned drone was behind the strike, which triggered heavy anti-aircraft fire. Residents had reported drone strikes in the past days, but there has been no confirmation and explosions heard in the city center this time were louder than in previous days.

Residents counted several missile strikes, which apparently hit a military camp of forces loyal to Tripoli in the Sabaa district.

Members of the Libyan internationally recognized government forces fire during fighting with Eastern forces in Ain Zara, Tripoli, Libya, April 20, 2019.
Members of the Libyan internationally recognized government forces fire during fighting with Eastern forces in Ain Zara, Tripoli, Libya, April 20, 2019. VOA

Haftar stymied

The Libyan National Army (LNA) force loyal to commander Khalifa Haftar started an offensive two weeks ago but has been unable to breach the government’s southern defenses.

If a drone strike was confirmed, this would point to more sophisticated warfare. The LNA has so far mainly used aging Soviet-made jets from the air force of Moammar Gadhafi, toppled in 2011, lacking precision firepower and helicopters, according to residents and military sources.

Tripoli, Libya
Tripoli, Libya

​In the past the United Arab Emirates and Egypt have supported Haftar with airstrikes during campaigns to take eastern Libya. Both countries flew airstrikes on Tripoli in 2014 during a different conflict to help a Haftar-allied force, U.S. officials said at the time.

Since 2014 the UAE and Egypt have provided the LNA with military equipment such as aircraft and helicopters, helping Haftar to gain the upper hand in Libya’s eight-year conflict, past U.N. reports have established.

The UAE even built an air base in Al Khadim in eastern Libya, one such report said in 2017.

The air strikes, which were also filmed by residents in video posted online, came after a day of heavy clashes in southern districts, with shelling audible in the city center.

A Libyan fighter loyal to the Government of National Accord fires a rocket propelled grenade during clashes with forces loyal to strongman Khalifa Haftar south of the capital Tripoli's suburb of Ain Zara, April 20, 2019.
A Libyan fighter loyal to the Government of National Accord fires a rocket propelled grenade during clashes with forces loyal to strongman Khalifa Haftar south of the capital Tripoli’s suburb of Ain Zara, April 20, 2019. VOA

Trump’s call to Haftar

The violence spiked after the White House said on Friday that President Donald Trump spoke by with Haftar earlier in the week.

The disclosure of the call and a U.S. statement that it “recognized Field Marshal Haftar’s significant role in fighting terrorism and securing Libya’s oil resources” has boosted the commander’s supporters and enraged his opponents.

Western powers and the Gulf have been divided over a push by Haftar’s forces to seize Tripoli, undermining calls by the United Nations for a ceasefire.

Both sides claimed progress in southern Tripoli Saturday, but no more details were immediately available.

A Reuters TV cameraman visiting the southern Khalat Furgan suburb heard heavy shelling but saw no apparent change in the frontline.

On Friday, two children were killed in shelling in southern Tripoli, residents said. The fighting has killed 220 people and wounded 1,066, the World Heath organization (WHO) said.

It was unclear why the White House waited several days to announce Monday’s phone call.

UN cease-fire

On Thursday, both the United States and Russia said they could not support a U.N. Security Council resolution calling for a ceasefire in Libya at this time.

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Russia objects to the British-drafted resolution blaming Haftar for the latest flare-up in violence when his LNA advanced to the outskirts of Tripoli earlier this month, diplomats said.

The United States did not give a reason for its decision not to support the draft resolution, which would also call on countries with influence over the warring parties to ensure compliance and for unconditional humanitarian aid access in Libya. (IANS)